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INTERNATIONAL 


tribune. 




PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

Paris, Tuesday, June 7, 1 994 


50 Years Agi 


Saved the World’ 


By R. W. Apple Jr. 

„. Ne * Yark Tunes SvrTHX 

COLLEVILLE’SUR-MER, France - At 

places with names that gleam on the page* of 

d « Hoc. Pegasus Bridie, 

Utah Bead; and more — ihe victors coro- 
mffliorated on Monday their success in 

breaching Hitler’s Adamic Wall a haltomu- 

ry ago and opening the way to ultimate tri- 
umph. 

“When they were young, these men saved 
the world. President Bill Clinton said of the 
survivors of D-Day, who gathered in the 
American cemetery on the bluff overlooking 
the bloodiest of the landing beaches. Omaha. 


“Wc are the children of yew sacrifice.” 

With the wraithlike outlines of American 
warships visible offshore, Mr. Clinton not 
only paid tribute to the 9,386 Americans who 
lie beneath the serried headstones of Colle- 
ville, but also asked God to give rest to the 
souls of all 40 million human beings who died 
in World War II — “soldiers on the field of 
battle, Jews in the ghettos and death camps. 
Chilians ravaged by shell and famine.” 

In a gesture of reconciliation, he added a 
word of praise for countries not represented 
here: “Germany and Italy, liberated by our 
victory, now stand among our closest allies 
and die staunchest defenders of freedom. 


Russia, decimated during the war and frozen 
afterward in communism and Cold War. has 
been reborn in democracy.” 

Earlier in a long day. Mr. Clinton had 
commemorated the role of the navy in the 
landings at a sunrise ceremony on board the 
aircraft carrier George Washington, which 
carried him across the English Channel last 
night; honored the Rangers who scaled the 
di/f at Pcrinie du Hoc. and delivered a speech 
at Utah Beach, the American sector on the 
Cotentin Peninsula, west of here, where two 
airborne divisions and combat engineers 
made especially big contributions. 

Still other ceremonies, made solemn also 


by the certainty shat this will be the last 
hurrah for most veterans, were led by Queen 
Elizabeth II of Britain and Prime Minister 
Jeon Chretien of Canada, the two stout Allied 
nations that contributed four of the nine 

divisions that stormed ashore on the Calva- 
dos coast of Normandy. 

And President Francois Mitterrand of 
France, whose libera non began here on the 
1.453d day of the German occupation, pre- 
sided over the biggest pageant of all on Oma- 
ha Beach itself, thanking the hundreds of 
veterans of many nations assembled there, as 

See NORMANDY, Page 7 




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PrestdeHt BOl Clinton walking with Ken Bargjnann, left, who scaled the cliffs of Pohite du Hoc on D-Day. With (hem were Mr. Bargmann’s son. a Vietnam veteran, and grandson. 

The Ordinary Guys Who Became the Heroes of D-Day 


New York Tima Service 
OMAHA BEACH, France — They look 
no different from the other guys who hang 
out at the Grange HaB or the ones who bowl 
in the Friday league- But talk to them, the 
heroes of Omaha and Utah beaches and the 
others, and they have a. thousand tales to lelL 
That is just the point. Most led ordinary 
lives before their supremely testing moments 
on D-Day, and .ordinary lives afterward as 
wdL Most do not see themselves as heroes, 
and they talk hesitantly, if at all, about the 
scenes of carriage that met them on that gray 
momma in. 1944. ■ 

Yet, as Donald Boyce, 69, from C&nm- 
chad, California, said here in Normandy this 


weekend, they got the job done. A jutnpmas- 
ter in a G47 that dropped one erf the first 
sticks of paratroopers from the 101st Air- 
bome Division over Sainie-Mfere EgHse m the 
predawn hours, be still marvels at U all. a 
naif-century later. 

"Somehow or other," he said, “a bunch of 
people who were only civilians — they told us 
what to do, they trained us — and we went 
our and battled a professional army and 
made Europe free." 

The returning veterans, those who jour- 
neyed to Anno, Italy, and Portsmouth, Eng- 
land, as wefi as those here, have been the read 
stars of the extended World War n ceremo- 
nies, nor the politicians. 


The Lull Ends in Algeria 
As Rebels Resume Attacks 


• - By Jonathan C. Randal 

Washixguxt Past Sendee 

■ ALGIERS 'Ending a two-month JuD. Is- 

tamic insurgents in the third year of a v *°^ t 

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have resumed attacks against government tar- 
gets from barracks to troop convoy* dashing 
President- 1 iatnine ZcrouaTs hopes of qndlmg 
the rebellion by a combination oT force and 
diaJogueL . 

• The country, North Africa’s largest and en- 
dowed with oH and gas nebes, thus seems 
beaded for stifrmora low-grade violence as a 

and an anny-based government scekmg m pire- 
OTvethe seoilar state that emaged vriimAlge- 
Swonin^Sdence; totFrencem 1961 
■ The renewed rd*l mifitaiy aperarifflK have 
undercut Mr. ZerouaTs innovanye iwm-ttMk 

the Islamic Salvation Front As a * 
stalemate tmpean to have set m, 

multiparty clcdkms when the falamw Front 

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Egypt.....-E. P.5W0 RfitWIWU.M JOFF 
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overvalued cuntaacy by 40 percent and adopt- 
ing its economy to market fences. 

Coupled with the failure of Mr. ZerouaTs 
initial contacts with Islamic From leaders, the 
singe in fighting has heightened concerns is 
Pails, Madrid, Rome and Washington about 
Algeria’s potential disintegration and repercus- 
sions in nearby southern Europe; already the 
mam destination for thousands of Algerian 
emigrants. 

Apparently in a hedging of bets that has 
troubled Algerian officials, American diplo- 
mats in Washington said the Clinton adminis- 
tration had initiated contacts of its own with 
Islamic Front representatives. 

. As if to underline their staying power and 
afcffity to strike seemingly at wffl, iatbe last two 
weeks Muslim guerrillas have killed dozens of 
draftee soldiccs, often by slitting their throats, 
m widely separated parts of the country. 

Despite an official news blackout, Algerians 
and d^omats reported dashes at TeHagfa, 30 
males smith of Oran; in Tenes, on the coast 73 
miles west of Algiers, the capital; in Medea, 50 
milfis south of ^ Algiers, and around the port of 
J|jd, neariy 200 mQes to the east 

Diplomats and die insurgent operations 
woe rally the most spectacular incidents in 
day-in, day-out violence in winch the terrified 
dfczemy is cm down by Islamic kfflers or shad- 
owy government death sqnads conducting sum- 
mary executions in randan reprisal 

[Umdentified gunmen shot and Killed a se- 
nior customs official Sunday, the official Alge- 
rian news agency said Monday, according to a 
Reuters repeat from Tunis. Abdallah Mons- 
souni, 40, was tailed in his home in Dergana, 
east of Algiers.} 

Althou gh information from within the [slain- 
ic movement is sparse, specialists say they arc 
convinced that the imprisoned I sla m i c Front 
.leadership camwt direct the smaller, more radi- 
cal Armed Islamic Group, led by veterans of 
the Afghanistan war, and may not be in total 

SeeAJLGERIA, Page 2 


One of ibeiji carried a 50-y ear-old photo or 
himself out of fear that his buddies would not 
recognize him. Another said he had begun a 
correspondence with the German who took 
him prisoner on D-Day. A third showed a 
reporter a treasure he said he had shown to no 
one before: an old, grease-smeared map of 
Anomanches, where his unit fought. 

□ 

At 24. Harlan Bean, from West Union. 
Ohio, was already a grizzled old soldier when 
he hit Omaha Beach- So were most of his 
buddies in the 1st Infantry Division. They 
bad already made landings In Sicily and Afri- 
ca, but for some, the gunfire pouring down 
upon them was still loo much to take. 


Kiosk 

Bosnians and Serbs 
Are Still Far Apart 

After a four-day boycott, ihe Bosnian gov- 
ernment on Monday joined talks in Geneva 
on stopping the fighting, but there was liule 
indication that differences with the Serbs 
over the length and nature of a cease-fire 
could be bridged. (Page 2) 


“If you can run. you run." Mr. Bean said as 
he looked down on '.he beach from the cliff at 
CoIleville-sur-Mer. close 10 the site of the 
German bunkers whose defenders had 
pinned his unri down for hours. "A lot of 
guys couldn't run. A lot of guys froze." 

Of the 250 people in his company, five are 

alive now, he said. He looked up and down 
the beach, with TV comer as set up on tripods, 
ships arranged carefully offshore 10 form a 
backdrop for President Bill Clinton’s speech, 
and said softly. "Don't look much like it did.” 
□ 

John McCcnas of Glen Bumie. Mary land. 

See VETS, Page 7 


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•••• 








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Book Review 

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TEARS — Scene in a Rwandan refu- 
gee camp. Elsewhere, government 
forces launched a fierce counterattack. 


EUtoTakeOn 

Bureaucratic 
Obstacles to 
Job Creation 

By Tom Buerkle 

fnctnurioiM/ HcraU Tribune 

LUXEMBOURG — Germany and 
Britain won a battle on Monday to use 
deregulation instead of public spending as 
the key dement to counter Europe’s un- 
employment crisis. 

European Union fin a ace ministers 
agreed to create an expert panel to root out 
bureaucratic barriers to jobs. 

The ministers also rejected a European 
Commission bid to seek fresh money’ to 
finance trans-European highways and rail- 
roads. the most visible element of the 
Union's program for boosting competi- 
tiveness and employment- Existing EU re- 
sources are more ample than originally 
believed, the ministers said, while environ- 
mental and planning hurdles are likely to 
delay ground-breaking on many of the 10 
priority projects. 

“There is no case whatsoever for any 
new financial instruments." said Kenneth 
Clarke. Britain's chancellor of the Exche- 
quer. The commission had initially sug- 
gested issuing bonds in the EU's name for 
the first time, but commission officials 
now dismiss that idea because of opposi- 
tion from member states. 

The agreement on deregulation was ac- 
companied by the dearest call yel from ihe 
ministers to spur job growth by cutting 
payroll taxes and making it easier for com- 
panies to hire and fire. 

The outcome ensures that EU leaders 
will have a mostly liberal economic agen- 
da, focused on cutting costs and increasing 
labor market flexibility, when they gather 
for their semiannual summit meeting in 
Corfu, Greece, on June 24 and 25. 

That is in line with the prescription for 
all major industrial economies that is to be 
endorsed by ministers of the Organization 
for Economic Cooperation and Develop- 
ment when they hold their annual meeting 
in Paris on Tuesday and Wednesday. 

This goes in the right direction,” said 
Laraberto Dim. Italy's Treasury minister, 
who added that the support of Rome's 
new conservative government to the 
Union’s traditional economic liberals, 
Bonn and London. 

The agreement on deregulation resolved 
a bitter dispute between Gunther Rexrodi, 
the German economics minister who first 
proposed the initiative last month, and 
Jacques Delors, the president of the com- 
mission, the EU executive. 

Mr. Delors had crilictzed Mr. Rexrodt’s 
plan as an attempt to make the commis- 
sion the scapegoat for Europe's record 
unemployment of nearly 18 million. He 
said a panel or independent experts would 
infringe on the commission's role as initia- 
tor of EU legislation and ignore the fact 
that national capitals, not Brussels, set 
most labor-market rules. 

Bui after talks between Bonn and Brus- 
sels, both sides produced a compromise 
Monday that will give the commission a 
seat on the panel alongside representatives 

See EUROPE, Page 2 


No. 34,608 

Jetliner Crash 
Kills 160 in 
China’s Worst 
Air Disaster 

Russian-Built Tu-154 
Goes Down Just After 
Take-Off From Xian 

By Patrick E. Tyler 

Sew lVrlt Timer Sfnir,' 

BELTING — China's over-stressed and fast- 
growing aviation industry suffered its worst 
single air disaster on Monday when a Russian- 
built passenger jet crashed' near the ancient 
northwestern capital of Xian, killing all 160 
passengers and crew. 

In two other incidents, a Dragooair flight 
from the Chinese city of Nanjing to Hong Kong 
made an emergency landing that injured eight 
passengers, and a Chinese domestic flight on^- 
uating in southern Fujian Province was hi- 
jacked to Taiwan. 

China has placed record orders for new 
American passenger jets and just this week 
agreed to lease five more Russian airliners to 
service the unabated growth in passenger miles, 
which are up another 20 percent this year after 
record growth in 1992 and 1993. 

A series of air crashes and a record n umber of 
hijackings last year prompted Communist Par- 
ty leaders to shake up the civilian air industry, 
replacing senior officials and inviting Western 
airline managers to criticize shortcomings in 
safety and maintenance procedures. 

Though Beijing's aviation safety record has 
been marred, none of the accidents has been as 
bad as the April 26 crash of the Taiwan-based 
China Airlines Airbus A -300 that killed 262 
passengers at Nagoya Airport in central Japan. 

The day of air disasters and piracy began 
when a Russian-built Tupolev- 154 airliner op- 
erating as China Northwest Airlines flight 2303 
took off from Xian shortly after 8 AM on 
Monday. Ten minutes later, the control tower 
at Xian yang Aiiport lost contact with the jet- 
liner, which crashed 30 kilometers southeast of 
the airport. 

The Xinhua press agency reported Monday 
night that of the 146 passengers and 14 crew 
members, there were no survivors. 

The official dispatch said that of the dead, 
133 were mainland Chinese, three were Hong 
Kong residents, one was from Taiwan and nine 
from other countries. 

The Reuters news agency sati a local tourist 
agency in Xian had reported Ahat an Italian 
family of four, including a 10-year-old girl and 
9-year-old boy, were among the passengers. 

A Western airline manager in Beijing said 
Monday night that there tod been persistent 
concerns expressed about the maintenance 
standards for theTu-1 54 inside Russia, and, for 
those planes leased to foreign carriers, “the 
unf am iliarity of ground crews with the equip- 
ment is an undeniable safety issue.” 

The plane was on a scheduled flight from 
Xian to the southern city of Guangzhou. Xian is 
a tourist center whore Chinese archaeologists 

unearthed an army of lerra-cotta warriors that 
date from 210 B.C. 

Deputy Prime Minister Zou Jiahua. along 
with officials from the Civil Aviation Admims- 
See CHINA, Page 7 


Analyzing North Korea: 
f Somebody Miscalculated’ 


By David E. Sanger 

New York Times Serxtce 

TOKYO — For America’s allies in Asia, ihe 
imagery is a bit eerie. As President Bill Clinton 
observes ihe 50th anniversary of D-Day. lead- 
ers across the Pacific are struggling once again 
to understand the motives of an 82-year-old 
dictator who seems to have stepped out of ihe 
grainy newsreels of another conflict and may be 
lurching toward a last, desperate confrontation 
with his old enemies. 

Few believe that North Korea’s president, 
Kim D Sung, will deliberately reopen the Kore- 
an War 41 years after it ended. Far too much 
has changed since his invasion of South Korea 
took Seoul and the Truman administration by 
complete surprise, and this time, Mr. Kim 
knows, China and Russia would not come to his 
aid. 

But few predicted that Mr. Kim would carry 
his defiance of the United Nations over inspec- 
tion of North Korea's nuclear complex this far. 
And the events of the last few days have cast 
doubt on the central assumption in dealing with 
North Korea: that the North's xenophobic 
leaders, desperate to prop up a sinking econo- 
my and to preserve their authoritarian govern- 
ment, are willing to trade the country's nuclear 
bomb project for the right package of economic 
benefits. 

“Somebody miscalculated," said a senior 
Japanese official who has been deeply involved 
in the issue. “Either it was us, or it was him." 

North Korea's outright rejection of UN Insis- 
tence dial it fully open its nuclear sites to 
inspection continued Sunday as the regime re- 
peated its threats to abandon the Nuclear Non- 


proliferation Treaty, which would end what 
little oversight of the unclear program now 
exists. 

Perhaps no authoritarian government has 
been as thoroughly psychoanalyzed and dis- 
sected over the last four decades, with less 
satisfying results, as the one run by Mr. Kim 
and his son and heir apparent. Kim Jong II. 

Years after North Korean agents assassinat- 
ed half of the South Korean cabinet and blew 
op a South Korean airliner, there are few con- 
vincing explanations about what the North 
hoped to achieve. 

And last weekend there was liule consensus 
about how seriously to lake the North’s warn- 
ing, in a meandering statement last week, that 
“economic sanctions would be regarded as a 
declaration of war against us." 

The uncertainty about the North's endgame 
has revived the arguments over whether sanc- 
tions are vital if (he United Nations is to retain 
any credibility af ter repealed warnings, or just a 
futile gesture that will do nothing to stop the 
nuclear project. The fear is that sanctions, co 
matter now carefully calibrated, would simply 
reinforce the North’s longstanding fear that it is 
surrounded by hostile powers. 

South Korea, which once looked like toe 
basket case of Asia, now has an economy 15 
times the size of the North's. Every year since 
1989, North Korea's gross domestic product 
has shrunk. Recent defectors, whose stories are 
sometimes enhanced by South Korea's intelli- 
gence agencies, report growing food shortages, 
occasional riots and continued repression. 

The dire economic straits are what led many 

SeeKIM,Page7 


In Japan 9 Soccer Is Starting to Kick Baseball Around 


By James Stemgold 

New York Tima Service 

TOKYO — Make no mistake: these are 
tough times in Japan. The economy is deep in 
recession, politics are in upheaval and (he cor- 
porations that invented lifetime employ mem 
are catting jobs. 

Rearing at a major league baseball game. 
Michio Snqji, a government official from west- 
ern Japan, said fie found these problems worri- 
some bat manageable. But he seemed less able 
to deal with signs of a crisis in a beloved sport. 


Silting amid rows of empty scats, almost 
alone behind first base in one ’of Japan's pre^ 
mier stadiums, the Tokyo Dome. Mr. Shpji 
dismissed the topic. “Tfijs is Japan." he said. 
“Baseball cannot be in trouble." 

But Japanese baseball is Iming fins, and it is 
losing younger fans, in droves They arc being 
seduced by another imported sport: soccer. 

In a marketing coup, the J- League, as Japan's 
professional soccer league is known, has be- 
come a runaway success m just its second 
season. The attractions include flamboyant, in- 
dividualistic stars, colorful uniforms, and stadi- 


ums that never grow quiet. Soocer is, in short, 
everything that the tightly controlled samurai 
version of baseball played here is not. 

Behind the hand-wringing over baseball is 
not just toe question of shifting tastes and fads, 
but the suspicion that younger people may be 
losing touch with the things that then conserva- 
tive elders believe make Japan special 

Baseball arrived here from America a centu- 
ry ago. but it has become the embodiment of 
what traditionalists regard as the source of the 
country's strength: self-sacrifice, self-disci- 
pline. teamwork, endless training that stresses 


form over flair, and strict corporate control. 

Soccer, by comparison, is chaos. 

“Soccer hasn't become a martial art, like 
baseball,'' said Robert Whiting, toe author of 
sevtial authoritative books on Japanese base- 
ball. “There isn't all this stuff about spirit and 
heart and purity. What young people see is that 
there are all these long-haired Brazilians run- 
ning around and screaming and having fun." 

Total attendance at baseball games dipped 
only slightly last year, to 22.7 million from 23,4 

See JAPAN, Page 7 




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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 1994 




Bosnians and Serbs WORLD 


In Cease-Fire Talks, ■SfSpsSsSSaSS 

But Stay Far Apart 


PARIS (Renters) 

Austrian policemen and prison g 


ful of Serbs, in defiance of a six- 
week-old NATO ultimatum, had 
been the reason oven by the Mus* 

, ° tINt r - lim-led govemment for its boycott plan 

boycott, the Bosnian ^government ^ Bosnian acquiescence to wca 
on Monday 


By Roger Cohen 

iVor York Times Service 

GENEVA — After a four-day 


treatment on foretgnere, ^ bepBbhsimd ibis-veek .-. » 

T - 8! SSKsi&ssss5Ssa: 

anintemaucmsl fcmni^gW When iheyoom- 


Pilrui A»iotn< Ajentr Fiancr Prcoe 

Kresnmr Zobak, left, the Bosnian delegation head, and an aide looking on as the group's spokesman, Ejup Game spoke in Geneva. 


y joined talks on stop- 
ping the fighting, but there was 
little indication that differences 
with the Serbs over the length and 
nature of a cease-fire could be 
bridged. 

Ejup Game, the vice president of 
the newly formed Muslim-Croatian 

federation in Bosnia, agreed to 
start talking after determining that 
no Serbian forces were left in the 
Muslim enclave of Gorazde in east- 
ern Bosnia. The presence of a hand- 


But the Bosnian axpiieKOice To 



EU Voters Set to Choose 567 Parliament Members 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 

AALST. Belgium — A European Parlia- 
ment campaign rally in this Flemish town 
lakes on almost a religious air as Leo 
Tindemans, the elder statesman of Belgian 
politics, mounts the podium to preach his 
pro-European creed. 

The former prime minister and foreign 
minister says Europe’s central challenges 
— mass unemployment and the risk that 
the war in the former Yugoslavia will 
spread nationalist contagion throughout 
Eastern Europe — go far beyond the pow- 
ers of any national government to control. 

The only alternative to further Europe- 
an integration, he says, is a return to the 
protectionism and competing alliances 
that wreaked disaster in the 1930s. 

“Either you choose the future, which is 
Europe, or you turn to the past, with all its 
consequences," says his son and campaign 
manager, Thomas Tindemans. 

The message resonates in the crowd of 
600 party loyalists and across Belgium, 
one of the last bastions of support for the 
European Union, but (here is little sign it 
will translate into votes Tor Mr. Tinde- 
mans’s Flemish Christian Democrats. 

Hie opposition Liberals share his pro- 
European convictions, but they are es- 
chewing EU issues and demanding a vote 
of no confidence in the heavy tax policies 
of Belgium's Christian Democratic-led 


government. The odds are they will get it. 
as polls show the Liberals replacing the 
Christian Democrats as the largest party 
in Flanders for the first time since World 
War II. 

Next Sunday's vote, said Annemie 
Neyis, who heads the Liberal slate in Flan- 
ders. “will certainly weaken the govern- 
ment." 

And so it goes across Europe. Beginning 
Thursday in Britain. Ireland. Denmark 
and the Netherlands and concluding Sun- 
day in the eight other EU countries, voters 
will choose 367 members of the European 
Parliament. 

The ballot comes at a time when the 
Parliament has finally gained a serious 
voice in the EU power structure, and when 
debale over the Union's future has healed 
up across Europe. But that debate is get- 
ting scant attention as politicians and vot- 
ers alike get ready to turn the election into 
12 separate refer end urns on national gov- 
ernments. many deeply unpopular. 

“European elections are typical mid- 
term elections," said Karlheinz Reif. the 
European Commission's polling chief. 
Parliament's role is vague in the minds of 
Europeans — most guess that it's more 
powerful than it really is — and Lhe elec- 
tion does nol produce a government with a 
prime minis ter or president. So voters of- 
ten use the occasion as a risk-free way to 
sanction their national government, espe- 


cially during recessions. Mr. Reif said. 

That is when they use the occasion a; all. 
Low participation is the norm, with a 
Harris poll last week showing less than 
half of eligible Britons and less than two- 
thirds of French and Spaniards planning 
to vote. 

For Germany, the electron will be a 
landmark. With 99 seats to fill as a result 
of unification, it for Lhc first time will have 
greater representation in an EU body than 
other major states, who will elect 87 mem- 
bers. 

For politicians, though, the vote is 
mainly a test of strength for the governing 
Christian Democrats ahead of national 
elections in October. The only European 
election issue has been money, with the 
Social Democratic leader Rudolf Sharp- 
ing criticizing Chancellor Helmut Kohl for 
fading to trim Germany’s role as paymas- 
ter of the EU budgcL 

in France, the vote will be a test of 
former Prime Minister Michel Regard's 
effort to revive the credibility of his Social- 
ist Party ahead of next May's presidential 
election. Defections by "Euroskeptics." 
Bosnia -supporting intellectuals and Ber- 
nard Tapie's rival Radical Energy group 
threaten to keep Lhe Socialists' share of the 
vote below the respectability threshold of 
20 percent On the right, the French depu- 
ty Philippe de Villers has mounted a vocif- 
erously ami-Union campaign but is ex- 


pected to draw few votes away from the 
governing Gaullisi-cenirisi coalition. 

In Spain, the vote will indicate whether 
financial scandals have undercut the legiti- 
macy of Prime Minister Felipe Gonzalez's 
Socialist government, while in Italy. Prime 
Minister Silvio Berlusconi is seeking to 
have his recent mandate strengthened. 

The closest thing to a tree European 
campaign is in Britain. Prime Minister 
John Major’s call last week for a multiple- 
speed Union, with countries not obliged to 
cooperate on all areas of EU policy, was 
rejected by the opposition Labor and Lib- 
eral Democrats as certain to marginalize 
Britain within Europe. The absence of a 
Labor leader following the death of John 
Smith has taken some pressure off Mr. 
Major, but the vote is still seen primarily 
as a referendum on his leadership. 

In Belgium, the absence of any deep 
divide over Europe has increased the 
vote's domestic importance. Scandals have 
badly damaged the Socialists in Wallonia, 
where they have long dominated, while the 
Christian Democrats show signs of sclero- 
sis from their long grip on power. 

The governing coalition will be seriously 
weakened if it falls below 50 percent of the 
vote nationally and the Liberals outdo the 
Christian Democrats in Flanders. The 
damage will be even greater if Prime Min- 
ister Jean-Luc Dehaene departs to head 
the European Commission. 


Peninsula’s rooftop pool 


. WWMr vSVOTHHr wIMRIr vBGMfl 


has the only 


ALGERIA: Islamic Militants Resume Their Attacks 




omm • i,in ’ ■' "^um 


lanes in New York 


Continued from Page 1 

control of the Islamic Front's own 
military wing, the Armed Islamic 
Movement. 

Because of Algeria's censorship, 
no official casualty statistics are 
published apparently for fear of 
panicking the country's 27 million 
citizens and its neighbors. 

But educated guesses suggest 
that some 4.000 .Algerians were 
killed in the first two years of strife 
and that in the last few months the 
accelerating loll has reached up to 
40 fatalities daily, including many 
civilians. 

Foreigners have been specifically 
singled out since September. A to- 
tal of 37 have been killed by Islamic 
extremists, provoking the depar- 
ture of most foreigners and dis- 
couraging desperately needed in- 
vestment from abroad. 

Foreigners still here lead circum- 
scribed lives, often without their 
families, who have been sent 
abroad for safety. Diplomats rarely 
leave their embassy grounds. Other 
foreigners constantly vary their 


movements and do not stray far 
from neighborhoods reputed safe. 

Further sapping Algerian society 
is the flight abroad of thousands of 
doctors, lawyers, architects, profes- 
sors, journalists, managers, engi- 
neers and others who considered 
themselves likely targets for Islam- 
ic assassins. 

Timid hopes of initiating mean- 
ingful peace negotiations between 
the army and the Islamic Front 
foundered late last winter. The fail- 
ure has frustrated many main- 
stream Algerians' dreams of recon- 
ciling moderate political Islam with 
secular institutions. 

Mr. Zeroual's midwinter deci- 
sion to meet jailed Islamic Front 
leaders Ali Benhadj and Abassi 
Madani in Biida prison outside .Al- 
giers broke a taboo. But it fright- 
ened many in the so-oiled demo- 
cratic parties representing 
educated, westernized Algerians. 
They feared the army and Islamic 
Front might cut a deal excluding 
their rival constituencies, often dis- 
organized but important. 

Two of these parties won seats in 


the first round of the 1991 dec- 
tions-before the second round was 
canceled — although the two par- 
ties finished far behind the Islamic 
Front. They are the Socialist 
Forces Front, strong among the 
ethnic Kabyle minority, and the 
National Liberation From, which 
monopolized power after Algeria’s 
independence from France but has 
tried to move toward democracy 
over the last half-dozen years. 

The 150.000-man army, made urp 
overwhelmingly of conscripts, is 
wideiy viewed as the last institu- 
tional bastion of the secular state. 


Still More Crowded in Macao 

Reuters 

HONG KONG — Macao, listed 
by the Guinness Book of Records 
as the most populous place on 
earth, recorded a population rise of 
3.S percent in 1993, the Portuguese 
news agency Lusa said Monday. 
There were 395,304 residents of the 
Portuguese enclave at the end of 
1993 — 20,419 per square kilome- 
ter. 


the United Nations-sponsored 
talks was scarcely enthusiastic. In a 
proposal submitted to Yasushi 
Akashi, the top UN official in the 
Balkans, the government suggested 
that a cease-fire be limited to a 
mere four weeks. 

The document, .made available 
to The New York Tones, said this 
brief truce could be extended “if a 
substantial and serious improve- 
ment" was made in separate politi- 
cal negotiations on a territorial set- 
tlement in Bosnia- Herzegovina. 
This stance underscored the 

main Bo snian preoccupation: that 

a cease-fire could consolidate the 
Serbs’ current hold on 72 percent of 
the territory of Bosnia without of- 
fering any guarantee that the Serbs 
win soon surrender land to secure a 
poli leal accord. 

A cease-fire that took hold in 
Croatia more than two years ago 
has not led to any relaxation of the 
Serbs' hold on the 25 percent of 
that country’s territory they se- 
cured during the 1991 Croatian 
war. 

For Bosnia, Mr. Akashi pro- 
posed a renewable four- month 
cease-fire, the withdrawal of forces 
on either side of the front line to a 
distance of two kilometers (12 
miles), the removal by both sides of 
weapons with a caliber of more 
than 12.7 millim eters beyond 20 
kilometera from the line, and the 
positioning of UN troops between 
the warring armies. • 

The Serbs, content with the terri- 
tory they bold and anxious to se- 
cure the lifting of international 
trade sanctions on Serbia, have 
broadly backed this proposaL Ra- 
dovan Karadzic, the leader of the 
Bosnian Serbs, said Monday that 
he had generally accepted ihe draft 
and that “its weakest point is that it 
is limited to just four months." 

Michael W illiam*, a spokesman 
for Mr. Akashi, said that the view 
of the United Nations was that 
anything less than a four-month 
cease-fire would be ineffective and 
vulnerable. 

“Four months would provide a 
lot of stability and a favorable con- 
text for a political settlement, while 
a shorter duration may fray at the 
edges more quickly," he said. 

Asked whether the difference be- 
tween the Bosnian proposal of four 
weeks and the Serbian insistence 
on at least four months could be 
bridged. Mr. Williams said. “We 
have got a very long way to go." 

Mr. Akashi plans to submit a 
revised draft for a cessation of hos- 
tilities to both sides before talks 
resume Tuesday. It was not clear 
how this will differ from his origi- 
nal proposal. 

A four-month cease-fire was re- 
quested last month by the United 
Slates. Russia and the European 
Union as an essential prelude to a 
political settlement 

Diplomats from this “contact 
group" have proposed a partition 
of Bosnia that would give 51 per- 
cent to the Muslim-Croatian feder- 
ation and 49 percent to the Serbs. 

Both sides have rgected the pro- 
posaL and the Bosnian government 
is eager to sec these political talks 
advance further before any long 
cease-fire is agreed. 



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Geneva, since 1755 


Explosion Rocks Marseille 

Reuters 

MARSEILLE — An explosion 
badly damaged the local headquar- 
ters of far-right National Front 
party overnight in this French 
Mediterranean port, the police said 
Monday. No one was injured. 


prison awaiting expulsion 
ty lawyer, the report said. . _ _■ 

Russian Premier in German dime 

Sunday, may undergo ultrasound treatment to. weak W - 

stones, the agency added. The name and exact location or the cons was 

°°TSne minister will return to Russia mi V 

earlier report, Itar-Tass said he would.return on Wcdmsday.Mr.Ocn^ 
myrdin had already undergone ultrasound treatment .for tbe-ao* a& 
ment in the Kremlin’s central hospital last autnmn. i 

Fierce Fighting Reported in 

LUANDA, Angola (Reuters) — The Angolan gowrimifl*.a»f te 
ITA rebels reported fierce fighting across the cxrnnuy oc Monday 
said attacks, in which hundreds of civilians had bcenkmeom tnepattfer 

^UNTTA nuEosud^UK civilians were killed and .341 wtxmdwl jqair 
strikes by government forces over the weekend in v^ous areat The 
government said shelling by UNITA the. besieged -oemral TOwn of 
Cuito had intensifi ed since Sunday and a4otal of 400. people 
since the bombardments began 10 daysago. ... ... 

No independent confirmation was imme diately available of thedaim* - 
by the two sides, which have been at war for neariy 2B.y«nL . 

Planted Bomb, Filipino 

ZAMBOANGA, Philippines (AP) — Muslim extremists tookc 
bility on Monday for a bombing that wounded. 35.. people;' ~ 
pledged to fight to the death as troops closed in on their bead . 

The military reported that four more soldiers were killed; 
trying to advance against the main camp of the AbaSayyaf group*mJci& 
Island, 160 kilometers (100 miles) southwest of Zamboariga City 
kilometers south of Manila. That brought the death toff rnttefighfog to- 
39. including nine troops and 30 Aba Sayyaf members. ; -■ : 

In a letter received Monday by the Zamboanga limes, iheAboSiyyxf; 
group look responsibiKiy fra: a bomb that exploded beneath a car ® v 
shopping district Sunday night The 35 wotmded included seven duMren. 

India Again Tests Ballistic Missile 

NEW DELHI (AP) — For the -second time in : thre e^days., Jjpdat 
successfully test-fired a ballistic missile Monday that Pakistan' has 
described as “provocative." ) 

With a range of 250 kilometers (155 miles) and a one-ton payioaC&e 
Prithvi missile is capable of hitting targets in Pakistan. The 8-meter-lOTg 
missile was launched from Chandmur, 1,200 kdomefm southeast of New 
Delhi. . • V- 

On Sunday, Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto of Pakistan called' the 
Prithvi tests “provocative," and said: “We will do wbataer is necessary 
for Pakistan’s security.” 

Correction 

A photograph caption on Page One of one edition on Monday 
incorrectly identified a vessel as a US. aircraft carrier. The ship, as airier 
edition reported, was a helicopter carrier. 

TRAVEL UPDATE ‘ tj 
Australia Weighs Rival Train Plans f 

SYDNEY (AFP) — A plan to lisk^ Canberra and Sydney by French- ® 
built fast trains could be derailed by a rival project using slower trains 
from Gennany and Spain, officials said here Monday. 

The conservative New South Wales government has refused to hdp 
federal government fund a feasibility study for the $2.4 billion ($1.77 
billion) French-backed Spcedrail project, opting instead for a govern- 
ment project using a "lilt-train’’ costing 100 million dollars. 

But the federal government in Canberra says one of (he ad vantages of 
the Speedrafl project is that it would cost the public purse nothing 
because it would be privately funded. During construction, it would also 
create about 17.000 jobs. Australia has 10 percent unemployment. r - 
Drivas m Shanghai's traffic jams will no longer be allowed to vent their 
frustration by honking their horns be ginning in July, under a new idle 
aimed at cutting noise pollution. (AfP) 

Air New Zealand said it phns a nonstop service between Sydney and 
Los Angeles, adding 1,000 seats a week between Australia and the Unfed 
States. The carrier said the service would begin Nov. 1 (Ratten) 

Thousands of Z ai rian s walked to work Monday when their capitals tari 
drivers staged an impromptu strike to protest bribes they say they have to 
pay the police. (&*»*/ 

Forest fires ripping through the islands of Ibiza and Migoreaii&ve 
destroyed as much land in less than a week as was lost to the flames in the 
islands during all of Iasi year, officials said Monday. (Keutcrff 

EUROPE: Attack on Joblessness • 


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of the 12 EU governments. The 
experts also will look at national 
regulations, as well as EU ones, 
that impede job creation. 

The job of the panel, said a Ger- 
man spokesman, is not to decide 
whether Brussels or national capi- 
tals should be issuing regulations 
but “to decide whether something 
is necessary at all.” 

The ministers also agreed to put 
a list of 10 transportation projects 
to the Corfu meeting for approval, 
including high-speed rail lines from 
Paris to Berlin, from Lyon to Turin 
and from Madrid to southeast and 
southwest France. But they rgect- 
ed the commission's claim that the 
Union faces a deficit of up to 6.4 
billion European currency units 
(S5.5 billion) on those projects over 
the next five years. 

“We think there is no gap,” the 
German spokesman said. Mr. 


Clarke said that governments were 
not willing to turn the Union intpi 
debtor at a time when thar chirf 
goal was to reduce national budget 
deficits. 

Henning Christqphersen , the EtT 
economics conunissjoner who is - 
steering wodc on the transport pro* » 
jects, insisted that the shortfall was 
real and that he was deterinmedlo 
get EU leaders to agree to addition- 
al funding at thar December meet - 
mg in Essen, Germany. But several 
EU officials said there was no qu^ 
Con of conside ring new fuoding. 
this year. . * J 

“The bottom line is rftai rich 
member states don’t want to ^ 
nancc projects in poor membs 
states,” said an official df- rtae 
northern EU country. Poor suits 
already benefit from huge EU de- 
velopment subsidies to build 
their road and rail networks Itt 
noted. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 1994 




Page 3 






POLITICAL NOTES 




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Morlh’t 1 SjloMr Honeymoon 

RICHMOND, Virginia — One day after Oliver 
L. North won Virginia's Republican nnrmti»fio n 
Tot the Senate, Bob Dole, the leader of the Senate’s 
minority Republicans, rained on Mr. North's vic- 
tory celebration by refusing to endorse him and 
reaching out to a potential North opponent. J. 
Marshall Coleman. 

Mr. Dole, of Kansas, said in a nationally broad- 
cast interview that "it's going to take a while** 
before he decides whether to support Mr. North, 
and that Mr. North's victory “makes it very diffi- 
cult for some in the Republican Party" to stay 
loyaL 

He also said be planned to meet this week with 
Mr. Coleman, a former state attorney general, who 
appears likely to bolt the Republican Party and 
nut for the Senate as an independent. Although 
Mr. Dole said he did not know what Mr. Coleman 
"has to say," some political analysts immediately 
interpreted the meeting as a highly public slap at 
Mr. North. 

Mr. North got more unwelcome news from an- 
other Republican senator, John S. McCain 3d of 
'Arizona, and from the man he beat Saturday, 
Rcmald Reagan’s hudget director, James C Miller - 
3d. Both offered Mr. North tepid support, but Mr. 
McCain, appearing, with Mr. ftaleon a CBS News 
program, said he thought Mr. North was a weak 
candidate. Mr. Miller said he had no plans to 
campaign for his eretwhflc rival 

In a news conference, Mr. North minrimzed the 
statements by Mr. Dole and Mr. McCain, noting 
that they came from two lawmakers “neither of 
whom are running in Vugnria.” 

Tm running for the families of Virginia," he 
said. Txn not running anywhere else but Virgin- 
ia.” 

Me. North had hoped to start his general elec- 
tion drive on an emotional In gh note Sunday, 
attending a “unity breakfast” with Virginia Re- 
publicans and beginning & four-day bus tour 
through rural Virginia. He vowed to press ahead, 
even though his hoped-for political honeymoon 
lasted las than 18 hours. 

“The only thing that’s going to slow this parade 


lost the use of his right arm from a war wound. 

Iowa Republicans* Fissure 

ANAMOSA, Iowa — Richard Schwann. Iowa's 
Republican Party chairman, describes Representa- 
tive Frederick L Giandy as a “risk-taker." He 
earned that reputation in 1986, when he returned 
to his home state and recaptured for the Republi- 
cans a House seal dial Democrats had held 12 
years. 

That made Mr. Grandy, an actor whose best- 
known role was as Gopher, the purser in the 
television series “The Love Boat.” a hero to Iowa 


down,” Mr. North said, “is aflat tire between toe 
and Danvffle-’’ 

The erjrigfcrti of Mr. North by senior members 
of his own party “is simply remarkable," said 
Robert Hdbwartn, a political scientist at Virginia 
Commonwealth University. “North’s c a ndidacy is 
already becoming a national issue,” he added. 
“You navis an extraordinarily divided Republican 
Party ip Vugmia at the moment. n 

He called Mr. North “perhaps the most polariz- 
ing figure on the political scene.” (WP) 


But these days Mr. Grand/s hero status has 
bees severely tarnished in the eyes of many Iowa 
Republicans because of another high-risk venture 
— his primary challenge to three-term Governor 
Terry £. Brtuuiad, also a Republican, that has 
exposed deep fissures in the state party. 

In the last two weeks before Tuesday's primary. 
Mr. Grandy has roamed Iowa's back roads in a 
recreational vehicle dubbed “The Guv Boat,*’ as- 
sailing Mr. Brans tad for “a partem of abuse and 
mismanagement” of state government and press- 
ing a Bill Clinton-type theme change. 

With the public growing increasingly sour to- 
ward politics, and the term-limits movement gain- 
ing momentum, Mr. Branstad's 12-year tenure in 
office is probably his most serious handicap. 

Pan of the Republican establishment has rallied 
to his side, including Mr. Schwann, former Gover- 
nor Robert Ray, who served a record 14 years, and 
Senator Charles E. Grasslev, Republican of Iowa, 
who last month suggested that Mr. Grandy should 
quit the race. 

“He’s got a future in Iowa politics if he wants to 
be patient," Mr. Grassley said. 

•But the toll of 12 years in the executive mansion 
and a distant relationship with Republican legisla- 
tive leaders have come back to haunt Mr. Bran- 
stad. Harold Van Maanen, Republican speaker of 
the Iowa House, bos endorsed him, but other top 
Republican legislative leaders are backing Mr. 
Grandy. So is state Auditor Richard Johnson, the 
only Republican betide Mr. Branstad to hold 
statewide elective office. 

“He’s . been there so long, there’s an anti-Bran- 
stad mood," said state Senate Minority Leader 
Jack Rife as he and Mr. Johnson campaigned with 
Mr. Grandy last week. “There are people who 
t hink this is his career, this is his Ere,” he said, 
adding: "I personally want new vision. 1 want 
change." (WP) 

Quote/ Unquote 

A1 Frank, 85, of North Miami Beach, Florida, a 
corporal who landed in the first wave at Utah 
Beach, at the D-Day commemoration: “I had to 
come. Several of my buddies are gone. This is the 
last time for me, and this is for them.” (AP) 




£ ST C 



Office-Seekers Count on Public’s Forgiveness 


N ..V' v . 


By Richard L. Berke 

* ( VfH York Tuna Struct 

RICHMOND. Virginia — Forgjvc or for- 
get. That would be an apt slogan for many 
candidate* running for office this year. 

While many an American legend was 
elected from a jail cell, the truth is that not so 
long ago politicians caught doing something 
wrong would often hurriedly look for the 
nearest exit from public life. 

Not any more. Perhaps sensing a more 
magnanimous public, or encouraged by 
President Bill Clinton’s refusal to let his 
personal foibles sink his campaign in 1992, 
politicians are brazenly barreling through. It 
is as if their acts of wrongdoing or moral 
breaches are little more dun political hurdles 
they must overcome. 

“Forgiveness is in vogue," said Harry Wil- 
son, a political science professor at Roanoke 
College in Virginia. “We saw that with Bill 
Clinton. He said. ‘I’ve done some things 
inappropriate and I’m sorry.’ It probably 
reflects this new generation of American 
politics.” 

If voters arc unwilling to forgive, then 
politicians hope they will forget, or at least 
not hold their transgressions against them. 

Nowhere is this more evident than here in 


Virginia, where Oliver L. North and Senator ity “not appropriate for a married man.” and had to relinquish the committee's chair. 
Charles S. Robb, candidates for the US. The fmgive-or-forget strategy is practiced The phenomenon of politicians seeking 
Senate, are imploring voters to stop dwelling wdl beyond Virginia. forgiveness is not entirely new. For example, 

on their stained pasts and focus on what they Former Mayor Marion S. Barry Jr. of Representative Gerry E.' Siudds. Democrat 
would do in office. Better yet, they want Washington was shamed into leaving public of Massachusetts, was censured by the 
voters to concentrate on the suined past of life (and forced into jail) after he was video- House in 1983 for having sexual relations 
the other guy. taped smeking crack in a federal investiga- with a 17-year-old male page 10 years earlier. 

Mr. North, who wen die Republican Sen- tion. He asked God and the voters for for- Mr. Studds apologized, and be has since 


the other guy. taped $n 

Mr. North, who wen die Republican Sen- tion. He 
ate nomination at his party's convention on riveness. 
Saturday, sought to turn his conviction for back, 
lying to Congress to his advantage. (The Repre 
charge involved his testimony about the Republft 
Iran-contra affair: the conviction was ora- for beinf 
turned on a technicality.) in a car 

in a film broadcast in the convention hall election, 
before the voting, the North campaign por- Repre 
(rayed bis appearance before Congress as a can of C 


tative Ken Calvert, a freshman 


with a 17-year-old male page 10 years earlier. 
Mr. Studds apologized', and he has since 
been re-elected five times. 

The specter of tarnished candidates’ dar- 
ing to run for office and proclaiming their 


Republican from California, has apologized virtues no doubt offends many voters. It also 
for being caught in a compromising position fuels the high levels of public disgust over the 


in a car with a prostitute. He is seeking re- 


fuels the high levels of public disgust over the 
quality of elected officials. 

Yet, as paradoxical as it may sound, candi- 


before the voting, the North campaign por- Representative Martin R- Hoke, Republi- dates seem io think that voters are willing to 
(rayed bis appearance before Congress as a can of Ohio, is making amends to women's overlook their indiscretions. The theory, per- 
mark of honor by featuring a medal-covered groups after being caught on video ogling a haps, is ihai people have become so cynical 
North, then a Marine lieutenant colonel, television producer and making comments that they now expect the worst from their 
addressing the Iran-contra committee. about her breasts. public servants and, thus, might be more 


addressing the Iran-contra committee. 

Once nominated, Mr. North joined the 
ethics police, chastising the administration 


In one of the most prominent cases. Rep- willing to forgive. 


ethics police, chastising the administration resen tative Dan Rostenkowski, Democrat of Former Senator Warren B. Rudman, Re- 
as “up to its caboose in the peccadilloes and Illinois and the powerful chairman of the publican of New Hampshire, who was chair- 
persona! distractions of its president." At a House Ways and Means Committee, won a man of the Select Committee on Ethics, said: 
party breakfast Sunday morning. Mr. North tough primary in April by imploring voters “All someone has to do now is say: Tm 
was introduced as a politician who “always to forge i. or ignore, allegations that he bad sorry. I spangled nine people. B-ji I was 
spoke out for principle." abused his office. Mr. Rostenkowski, who hallucinating. But I'm sorry.* ” 

Mr. Robb, who is expected to win the faces a general election in November, was He added, “America is a very forgiving 
Democratic nomination, has conceded activ- indicted last week on 17 criminal charges, place." 


Mr. Robb, who is expected to win the faces a general election in November, was 
Democratic nomination, has conceded activ- indicted last week on 17 criminal charges. 


Scattershot Licensing of Gun Dealers Under Fire 


By Michael deCourcy Hinds 

iVe-w York Times Service 

PHILADELPHIA — Last year, Terrence Williams, a hair 
stylist seeking to earn a little extra money , did what 230.000 
other Americans have done: be obtained a federal license to 
buy and sell firearms. 

Now, Mr. Williams, 27, is serving a four-year sentence in 
federal prison for illegal gun trafficking. 

So far, his guns have been linked to two homicides — a 
young woman in Camden, New Jersey, shot in a dispute with 
her boyfriend in January, and a 21 -year-old man found dead 
here last year — and two armed robberies, five assaults and 
at least two dozen other crimes in Pennsylvania and New 
Jersey. Eleven of his guns were taken from juveniles. 

Mr. Williams's quick success, selling 793 handguns in 
about two months, is not surprising. He sold guns m bulk, 
kept no sales records, did not ask customers for identifica- 
tion and did not require them to wait the state-mandated 48 
hours before receiving their guns while local police could 
check for criminal records. 

He removed serial numbers from about 250 guns to 
prevent them from being traced. 

' Gun-control advocates, law-enforcement officials and 
even some gun dealers say the Williams case illustrates the 
shortcomings of recent gun-control measures, including the 
Brady law's restrictions on some assault weapons. 


Restrictions on gun sales win have little effect, they say, if 
the government continues to dispense firearms licenses so 
freely and authorities fail to monitor dealers. 

“The system of federal licensure of gun dealers is a 
national scandal," said Carl Bogus, a visiting professor at 
Rutgers Law School and an adviser to the Violence Policy 
Center, a Washington organization that researches gun vio- 
lence. “There are more federally licensed gun dealers than 
gas stations in this country, and the gas stations are far more 
rigorously regulated and monitored.” 

Gun-shop owners, their anger fueled by the competition, 
are equally blunt. 


the National Alliance of Stocking Gun Dealers, a trade 
group that represents 16,000 gun stores. 

Mr, Bridgewater said his organization's national survey 
last year identified 7,000 people they call “kitchen- table 
dealers," who operate from home and violate some law 
connected to gun sales. 

A federal license permits a person to buy weapons individ- 
ually or in bulk through the mail from wholesalers or 
distributors, and to sell those weapons to all but prohibited 


groups: minors, felons, obvious drug and alcohol abusers 
and the mentally DL 

For the last 35 years, license applicants had simply to pay 
$30 to the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and FtrearauC submit 
a Social Security number and affirm that they had not been 
institutionalize)! for mental illness and were not felons. The 
bureau used to issue licenses so freely that, toits embarrass- 
ment, it issued them in the names of two dogs in 1990. 

Last year, the Clinton administration ordered the bureau 
to tighten the process. Since August, applicants have been 
fingerprinted and photographed as well, and the bureau now 
tdls applicants that their names will be sent to the police, 
who may check on their compliance with the law. 

Since the new rules have been in place, the number of 
people applying for firearms licenses has plummeted. In 
March, 1,100 applied, compared with 7,000 m March 1993, 
said Jack Killonn, a bureau spokesman. 

Most gun-license applicants declare that they intend to 
buy and sell guns as a primary livelihood, but in reality, the 
firearms bureau says, most people want to buy guns at 
wholesale prices fra 1 personal use. 

“Probably 70 percent of the people holding licenses 
shouldn't hold them," Mr. Killorin said. 

In 1993, the bureau took 143 of 252,000 license holders to 
court nationwide, and administratively revoked 26 licenses, 
though some of those dealers might have appealed. 


Getting Down to Business 

Congress Gears Up for Serious Dealing on Health Bill 


By Robin Toner 

New York Tunes Service 


NEW ORLEANS — The tech- House and Senate in (his danger- 
nocratic era of the health care °t»s season: “I’m going to do any- 
struggle is long over, and the White l & i ng that gets me out alive. " 


Mr. Breaux gave what may be die approach of the midterm cJco- 
the credo for members of the dons, the turmoil around Repre- 
ouse and Senate in this danger- sentative Dan Rostenkowskfs in- 
is season: “I'm going to do any- dictment and the recognition that 
ing that gets me out alive." unless the major committees — 


House policy purists have been 
consigned to the sidelines. 


Indeed, visits to four states over 
the Memorial Day recess, which 


It is June, time is running short cuds, on Tuesday, underscore the 
for passing a bill, and some major political risks for those who hope to 
Congressional committees have win passage of major health legisla- 
been stymied for months over one don this year— and thus their need 
Central issue: whether to require for some kind of face-saving corn- 
employers to contribute to die cost promise, fast, 
of their workers' insurance. They face increasingly energized 

For the lawmakers in the middle, interest groups, such as the smalJ- 
it is time for some serious dealing, business owners in Philadelphia, 
time to look for some political fixes which grilled Erskine Bowles, ihe 
and some political cover and time head of the Small Business Admin- 
Id find a way to finesse the yawning istration, about the workings of 
chasm between those who have President Bill Clinton's health plan 
proudly and angrily opposed those last week. 

“employer mandates” and those They face television and radio 


who have just as proudly and angri- commercials in opposition to the 
ly supported them. various elements of restructuring 

It is the moment, in short, when health care and six months of see- 
politicians such as Senator John B. ond thoughts about the need for 
Breaux. Democrat of Louisiana, a change, 
member of the Senate Finance "They’ve become more cau- 
Commitiec, a quintessential swing tious," was how Senator G. Kent 
vote who loves to deal, become Conrad, Democrat of North _Dako- 
very, very important. ta, another member of the Finance 

“If we all stick to whai we initial- Committee, described his consritu- 
ly proposed, well all go off the cliff ents after a week of public forums 
together," Mr. Breaux said during on health care, 
the weekend. "For all of us, there's a growing 

“This thing is not going to be understanding of how really corn- 
solved from the left or the right, but plicated this is," he said, 
from the center.'* Adding to the political anxiety is 


perhaps most notably, the Senate 
Finance Committee, with its nar- 
row ll-to-9 Democratic majority 
— move a bill this month, the 
chances of completing it this year 
are slim. 

All of this heightens the urgency 
of doing something. To the health 
planning purists who say this is no 
way to make policy, Mr. Breaux 
replies. “It may not be. but not 
passing the bill is not doing it ei- 
ther. 

“If we consider ourselves at 
ground level zero right now, and 
the president has proposed a 10, 
Congress is not going to pass a 10," 
the Louisiana Democrat added 
"But I think we could do a 7 or an 
8, and that would be a huge im- 
provement ” 


Away From Politics 

• An argument turned Into a riot in Oakland, California, when the 
police arrived at a lakeside festival. At least 10 people were injured, 
including a police officer. Gunfire was reported during the melee 
that broke out at Lake Merritt in downtown Oakland, but no one 
was believed to have been shot 

o A forma' lawya, Howard Hunter, was named Monday as the next 
president of the Mormon church, replacing Ezra Taft Benson, who 
died last week. Mr. Hunter, 86, was named as the 14th “prophet, seer 
and revelaloT of the 164-year-old church, based in Salt Lake City, 
which has some S tnilKon members worldwide: 

• A soup of youths at a poolside eod-of-scbooi party in San Marino, 
California, got intoan argument and left angry, then came back with 
guns and opened fire. The police said two teens were killed and seven 
others were wounded. At least two people began spraying bullets 
from semiautomatic handguns into a crowd of about 100 young 
people in the affluent Los Angeles suburb. 

• Ttoo men who said they had been lost in open seas for 15 to 20 days 
were rescued off Cape Lookout, North Carolina, by a U.S. Coast 
Guard helicopter crew. The two men were slightly dehydrated and 
malnourished, but arrived at the Coast Guard station m Elizabeth 


City, North Carolina, with only cuts and bruises. The men said they 
had been fishing off Fort Lauderdale, Florida, when their boat’s 
engine failed ana they became caught in the Gulf Stream. 

• The son of Raymond L Flynn, the U.S. Ambassador to the 
Vatican, spent the weekend in jail in Boston, charged with threaten- 
ing his mother with a shovel after a night of drinking. Raymond L 
Flynn Jr., 27, was arrested after Ms mother called the police, saying 
he was chasing her around their home in South Boston. Catherine 
Flynn told the police that ha son was out drinking until 5 A.M. and 
became violent when she questioned him about it. ,ip, afp 


Roberto Burle Marx Is Dead at 84 


New York Times Service Massimo TrofcL 41, Director 

WDEIANEBO-Rdpe And Actor in Italian Onenui 
Burle Marx, whose mark on Bra- orwr: m . > Ta 7 
aril's landscape ranged from the un- ~ Massimo 

dulating mosaic sidewalks of Rio’s 2? a ' f *• “J 1 "™ act f r n and $- 
Copacabana Beach to the hanging Sj ^ ^ 


^Foreign Loggers Threaten ‘Last Rain Forest’ 


gardens in the new capital of Brasi- 
lia, died Saturday. He was 84 and 
lived in his lush, botanical retreat, a 


family said on Sunday. 

A Neapolitan, Mr. Troisi was 
renowned for the black humor of 


former coffee farm, 55 kilometers jus work- He shot to fame in Italy 


from here. 


in 1981 when he starred and direct- 


M By Philip Shenon 

NewYork Tin** Service 

• ’ PORT MORESBY, Papua New Guinea 
1L. Hidden in the lush vastness or the ram 
forests of Papua New Guinea there is aland 
that time forgot- It is a place so untouched by. 
the outside world that many of the forest- 
rfweUm here still wear bird feathers mid 
grass sidm, use shells and pigs' tath for 

money and remember not-ao-distant raa- 
tives wi» celebrated victories over tiidr trib- 
al ewmi% by eating them. . .. i. 


dozer owned by a forrign logging company 


came crashing into Mr. Mutomutu’s tiny such massive tropical forests could affect 
farm of banana trees and watermelon vines, climatic patterns elsewhere in the Pacific, 
destroying the only source of income for his Rare species of plants and animals have 
family of 16. been put m danger — the variety of wildlife 

*T do not know what I will do now,” said in Papua New Guinea is among the most 
Mr. Mntumuto, adjusting and readjusting diverse on earth, including the world's larg- 
his “lap-lap, ” the ragged piece of doth tied cst butterfly and 38 of the 43 spedes of birds 
around his waist, the only item of clothing of paradise — along with some of the world’s 


around his waist, the only than of doming of paradise— al 
that be has ever worn or, for that matter, ever most ancient trii 
needed. “This is a bat 


Conservation groups warn that the loss of schools, government offices,” Mr. Tiong 
ch massive tropical forests could affect said. 

malic patterns elsewhere in the Pacific. But as they rake in huge profits, the log- 
Rare spedes of plants and animals have gers are creating for themselves a reputation 
eu put m danger — the variety of wildlife note for corruption and violence. The indus- 
Pflpud New Guinea is among the most try’s critics say tbtty have been the targets of 
verse on earth, including the world's larg- death threats, or worse, 
t butterfly and 38 of (he 43 spedes of birds Mr. Neville, the forests minister, says that 


He died of congestive heart fail- ^ in his film debut, “Ricomindo 
urc, friends said. da Tre" (“Back To Square Three"), 

During a 60-year career, Brazil's which was a big box-office success, 
most prominent landscape artist He shared the award for best 
brought his nation's rich fiora out performance Ity an actor at the 


from Europe’s shadow and became 1989 Venice Film Festival with 
a tireless champion of Brazil's or- Marcello Mastroiansi for their 
chids, palms, water lilies and bro- roles in the film “Che Ora E" 

<- A /miru.. r: v. u.. 


with some of the world’s since he announced a crackdown on foreign 


mcliads. 

His nearly 3,000 landscape 
jecis in 20 nations across toe e 


(“What Time Is IcT) by the Italian 
director Ettore Scola. 

John Jay Hutchbt, 79, an inter- 


cul turns. 


logging he has twice been confronted by 


Eighty percent of. 


“This is a battle that pits people wearing gun-wielding attackers. 


. of. Papoa New Guinea is ioindoihJ and bird feathers against fast-talk- 
— 145,000 squarenriles of ing, fast-moving foreign loggers," said Tun 


Parnia New Guinea has been described by covered by trees — 145,000 square miles of ing, fast-moving foreign logger 
conKrretionfcn as (he last rain forest, and n tropical forest, spread across an archipelago Neville, the forests minister of 


is not much erf an exaggeration. This remote d 600 islands at toe point near toe couator 
Pacific country is carpeted by some of the. where Southeast Asia wills into the Sooth 
last ex tensiv e stretches of- pristine tropical Pacific: The western halFof the main island is 


Guinea and the nemesis of the 


Henderson, an AustrsHan-bont envi- 


■talk- The amount of wood exported from Papua 
Tim New Guinea has quadrupled since 3980, 
New when 642,000 cubic meters of logs left toe 
ysuun countiy. In 1992, 2 million cubic meters of 
logs was exported. The exports grew last year 
envi- by more than a third, to 2.7 million cubic 


ranged from the gardens of the Or- national lawyer, died of cancer 
gamzation of American States in May 31 at his home in Santa Bara- 
Washington to a redesign of Bis- bare, California. From 1946 to 
cayne Boulevard in Miami, from. 1949 he had been a judge on the 


the gardens of the Unesco head- International Mixed Courts of 


3 uarters in Paris to a tropical gar- Ej 
en under glass at Longwood Gar- in 
dens in Pennsylvania. th 


Egypt. He lived from 1950 to 1980 
inParis, where he was a partner in 
the law firm of S. G. Archibald. 


forest to be found anywhere on the planet. occupied by Irian Jaya, a province of Indo- ronmentahst who has lived in Papua New meters, equal to about 3 million trees, with 


From 1980 to 1983 he served as an 
arbitrator for the International 
Chamber of Commerce. He re- 
turned to the United States, where 
he was on the board of toe Ameri- 
can Hospital of Paris Foundation. 

Mark McManus, 60, who began 
his acting career in the theater but 
found fame in the role of a dour 
detective in the popular television 
series “Taggart," died Mem day in a 
Glasgow hospital, where he had 
been admitted last week suffering 
from pneumonia. 


Japan Atom Plant Shut OS 

77ie Associated Press 

TOKYO — Tokyo Eectric Pow- 
er Co. said Monday that it had shut 
(town a nuclear power plant after 
finding damage to a pump that 
provides water for making the 
steam that turns the plant’s genera- 
tors. There were no fears of radio- 
active leakage from the plant in 
Fukushima, m northern Japan, a 
company spokesman said. 


- But even the “last rain forest” ss now to ■ neaa. 

danger The forests of flapw New Guinea— With only 4 million people, Papua New 

andaww of fifethw have sheltered since the Guinea is among toe most sparsely populat- 
S»eAie— are threatened by a stampede edooontrieson eanh, and many of the forest handful 
of forrigxt loggers desperate for * new tabes haw been isolated from, their neigh- 
souices of tropical timber. Environmental^ bors for centimes. ' 
ists say the timber with commercial value The result todty is a paradtre for linguists, 

hcre couM be Felled within a generation, since there more than 700 distinct languages 
nossibly within a decade. ' bere,afifthofthelanguageskn<n^ 

use the bulldozer to make a road to PitoEnghshSffVK as a naucaiaj language, 
hrinj, the trees down to the sea, and they andthe ( expresacm‘Tiappynoon' , is a nation- 


GuiMft for 30 years, says the loggers are most of the logs bound for wood-processing 


in a “magnificent con.” plants in Japan. 

k$ger5 turn up on a beach with a If the environmental stakes were not so 
money,” he said, “and ten these high, the negotiations over lumber rights 
downers, Tm here to help you if might be comical, with loggers venturing 
just take down a few of these old hundreds of miles into the dense forests to 
they leave the landowners with wave money al villages of illiterate, nearlv 

naked foresi-dwdlers. 

Emptied by toe Forests Ministry “These are bush people," said Helen Pilon, 
ipport the charge. Government a social worker here whose job requires her 
tt that nearly $500 million worth to take daylong hikes into the jungle to 
re shipped out of Papua New explain the concept of logging rights to rc- 
■ y«ai- the payment to the tribes mote tribal villages, 
ly own the forests was less than “They live in bush houses, with no power. 

, wilh pit toilets, using dogs* teeth for monev, 

nstw thaino one is being cheated. For many of these people, the first time Kiev 


since there mwe than 700 distinctlanguages 
here, a fifth of the languages known on earth. 


that stretches down the mountain behind Jus 
village, a huge brown, scar sucing through ine 
dense 10Moot-bigh canopy of waJnut and 
Sophyltom trees. “The loggers <to not thrnk 
atvyu the fife of the wonte here. ■ 


about the m of me peppre nor. 

' Mr. Mutumutu does not know exactly 
how old hois. AD telaum? fl»t hewas 

born before "the Ugf&tr ^g^SSS 
as World War U, the ontyevet » that lmkcd 
tofcpecpte of the* tnigeatic forests .to. the 

Buff Mr. Mutumuto ami his 

lost track- of the 20 to;aafuty, u «s fast 
catching up to than. Late last y»r* a 


at, and they andtbe expresacm “happy noon” is a nation- figures show that nearly $500 million worth 
said Vincent al greeting. of logs were shipped out of Papua New 

rigging road The togjps See a paradise of a different Guinea last year. The payment to the tribes 
n behind his sort The forests are thick with hardwood that actually own the forests was less than 
through the trees, including walnut, mahogany and pine, SIS million. 

walnut and' ami the logring companies describe a re- Loggers insist thaino one is being cheated, 
dotted think source worth .bultons of dollars in a world They say their industry is creating wealth for 
r."- market starved for tropical timber, a backward people whose wretched living 


Figures compiled by the Forests Ministry 
seem to support the charge. Government 


HOTEL DU RHONE 


GENEVA 


source worto brUtons of dollars in a world They say their industry is creating wealth for ever see an outsider is when they meet a 
market starved for tropical timber, a backward people whose wretched living logger" 

The largest foreign logging conqjames op- conditions have always been ignored by their Honest loggers admit that native villagers 
crating hat pome from Malaysia, a country own government. are easily cheated, and that tribes often sell 

that has already sacrificed much of its own “Our industry has a lot of contributions to their rights to millions of dollars worth of 

rain forest to rapacious logging. _ make," said Francis Tiong, general manager trees for a pittance. 

Evidence of the toggeurwork is mcreas- of the largest of the Malaysian logging firms. The government estimates that a village 

ingiy easy to find. Some Jogged areas hae Rimbunan Hijau, which translates from Ma- will receive about $24 for even tree taken 
resemble moonscapes, with- so much of the lay as “Beautiful Forest.” from its forest, while the logging company 


business 


7. 



resemble moonscapes, with so much of the toy as “Beautiful Forest' 
vegetation-and topsoil stripped away that toe “In remote, rural area* 
forests may never jrow back. build roads, communit 


“In remote, rural areas of the country, we will sell the tree for nearly $600 — of which 
build roads, community halls, churches, at least a third is profit. 


TEL. (41 22) 731 98 31 



Thi* hwiv. Lcjdlnn Hoick 

FAX (41 22) 732 45 58 


s 





Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 1994 


THE TE4TREB 




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WEDNESDAY. JUNE 7. 1941 



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RMW tO Work From Soviet Base Is MoOSCVelt S 


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Asad Prayers So ^ lo ^ZXZ^ n Report of Day 

Airport in Romania *“ ~~ 

Crowds Aro Tense, but — Tells 181 at Press Session 

Noe Excited in Awaiting an American bomber base, of Gains, and His Mien 

Hints Attacks to Come 






Noe Excited in Awaiting! an American bomber sake, of Gains, and His Mien 
latest Invasion Details Hints Attacks to Come 

bases In Russia for the first tune 

- - la history, heavy bombers of the , 

5§«$$© at Services 15U1 UEited ** Force t0 “ He Gives No Denial 

9 day blaated a German airport at _ 

At Madison Sonarepe Romanian city ot Gals.il, at Of Ollier ■ fl n dlT? PB 

a the mouth of the Danube River. ________ ° 

It was the second phase of the 

Ales' Anthems AreSong shuttle bombing over the Russian- Won t Answer Questions 
5n Solemn Ceremonies: SSS^based^ fSertcan M ?eavy on Blows by Russians, 
SSamcge s Sent Leaders ***** whlch lBBVSed RU83to Calls Allied Loss Light I 

° after ham^Mriwg {hbreceo, Hun- 1 

Bj- Joia a Ro* m . UW to WAsS.OTO^r. The 

Tfca grim news of Invasion, direct support of the Red Army. JJJfJ ^ 

avotted hourly for so many weeks and the Plyloa PflrtxeMea were 
fiat tt struck with little surprise, escorted by both Soviet and Amer- 

aaisinysM srawiE sg 

wuiFleemg Nazis £ 

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dsr ad determined devotion to ^ LOSS til mnwnnc *u» M another the 

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Take Army to JHw 


Only SO Warpfefis 
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By Bert Andrew* 
WASHINGTON. June 6,— The 
Allied Invasion of Europe Is “up 
to schedule.** president Roosevelt 
declared today at a news confer- 
ence at which his surface gravity 
gave so Utile concealment to his 
Inward satisfaction that It led 
many listeners to infer for one 




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Arrows indicate where the Germane reported Allied incation thrutlt on a front tfreCcfcin^ between Cherbourg ( 1 ) 
and Le Havre (2), although the fimit said a baffle was raging north of Rouen (3). A beachhead was reported 
fo have been ettabluhed near higny (4). Other Allied forces had driven into Caen (5) 


By Geoffrey Parson* jt ; 

By r«f*ptoe« ta ts* <W*“TS!iW'r.- I 
Cato***. t«t «•» T«* THWaOSa: 

SUPREME HEA3X RJAIU i 
XERS, AUjJBD EXPEM- 
TIONARY FOB0S, ;^tjr 
(Wednesday). “ InRail ;»■ 
cena in all . 

ported at Alliod b e atop Qg g 
at midnight Itetii Irh^tooHa^ 

four hours after .ASfeipfia^ 
chutists had h ad rf/ .i^jjg* > f 
mandy as the advaocafonref *> 
the mightiest combfesf -hir. 
land azid sea invasfcfflf^t^s- 
tory. 

Allied troops hra pushed 
into Franca from beachheads, 

and Allied headquarters 0H~ 


People Join la Prayer 


°n£r%‘T - Churchill Says Reporter in Plane Over France 600 Navy Guns finned report* feat therein 
Allied Progress Sees Invasion Pattern Unfold Blasted G)ast ^ 

“™° rt T iC .“ r ^ ? n r T l. line, sin* enfrhilf n*l 

TSSli Is satisfactory Landing Craft Pile Into Beflches Near Cherbourg, BeforeLanduig m ■ 

ism of the ITT »_« m . n.r nr i raj.. n.. I I roops rw«iy *■■■■». 


Landings Were Feature; 
Sea Obstacles Overcome 


Warships Blast Defense Works, Gliders Dot 
Landscape, Allied Flyers Are Everywhere 


Steteotaa far latest report* on the Reserves Needed in We 9 l and radio reoartera soon after 4 Arrows indicate where the Germans reported Allied incation thrutlt on a front stretching between Cherbourg (1) tiw i.V ; 

^ata t Invasion In history. There R etTe at lo Po Valley P- m,‘ a UtUe less than sU hour. and Le Hccre (2), although tkajtoue said a battle was raging worth of Rouen (3). A beachhead was reported ^jj ied ^ haW^W 

probacy was not a person In the y Mfore h8 ^ 80ne on the air to fo hevm been ettabluhed near lngny ( 4). Other Allied forces had driven Into Caen ( 5 ) JL i „ , , - 

?*****•* ^ R. ^ H Americans In a prayer for i , jinto . . ..n t-u rk — 

OmrcMil Says | Reporter in Plane Over France 600 Navy Guns firmed report* feat therein 
pw«« w» •« oJ'SoTjS? JSS™ ^ humanity!" ^ Allied Progress Sees Invasion Pattern Unfold Blasted Coast on the VarS^S^bourg a*in 

22ost of Mew yortt-a more than the invasion news, the Allied a r- Eas Ztaenhower Report _ # ° . | n _ T line, SUM aBd ODe-h*lf niUtt 

S SSmS X Is Satisfactory Landing Crafl Pile Inl0 Beflches Neftr Cherbourg, BeforeLanding 

throiahout tin da*, and. ta an es- lanuina w*» toto central Italy and how the current phase ot the _ 7 WgMkin« Bloat Tlofonso Wr\i>lra Tint ,IW “ r irony arnsn .. 

test, deaamtnation was forgotten. °»klng good progress toward Clvi- march of liberation was planned. Telia Commons* Air-Borne P 1 ’ iNni Rocket Shells, Allied Troops and tanks arvfir&^T 

Tte people, in many cases, simply tovecchia and viterbo the President had before him s Landings Were Feature; Landscape, Allied Flyers Are Everywhere Flares Starfish t* and ashore at many points staff 

mtcral va church they passed A hundred more prisoners were late report from General Dwight * « r teres, surugnts and at many 

aad knelt and prayed. captured by the 5th Army within D. Elsenhower, the supreme com- Sea Obstacle* Overcome g y j Rc ^. j ait Bombs Joined in Display t 

The largeat assemblage of prayer, thc ^ twenty-four hours, with mander of the Allied forces, that me rrt***m to tit »»<u covr^vm. nu.em Tort rntitcw, 7- coafl t between > L* Havre aiW 

Ut» city's only ofH riai obwrv- very lighting and negligible as of noon today American naval °y Joseph same* AT A 9TH AIR FORCE BOMBER BASE. England, June 6.— Down By Joseph Driscoll Cherbourg. Allied heaetpar- 

acsz ct the day, was held at Madl- «™alties. in the coastal sector looses were two destroyers and one *££1 *i'*" . below the first group of Marauder medium bombers to strike the fcnWssnaiwiMii. tors is releasing f ew«t*fl« 

am SgTMte under the qmisanhlp «*» BriUah ^oops. sweeping LST. and that losses Incident to Cherbourg peninsula at dawn today were the thin lines of Invasion copt^Iu.^ u«.»e-Tor* Tram*, me. as to the actual progress*? 

rfSaorcrF. H. LaGtiardia's D Day 10 01 Rivtr ^w* & landings were relaUvely JuDe J •craft pushing in to hit the sandy . B ^ DE .^ A snNE - Jane ®— operations, beyond expresnag 

CteTSWee. heeded by Grover A ° 76rtook captured more than light, about 1 per cent. but duiet House of Common* it p 1 pi . j beaches a few minutes later. ** 1 *“*■ «« *u*antiy and 

TTImten. two thousand Germans before they In his mind he had more de- noon today Prime Minister OUC-K LlCC tCCl. Standing out from the shore en * ln * ei » °»»r tanks and ducks. fceMral satisfaction. 

Tfcme. at 3:30 p. m, a police- coaWeroa Abandoned guns, tanks tailed information given him ear- Churchill told the news ol 7 bow to stern, were the destrwen.’ "* the shores of France ■*«* German radio 1ft n»PB 

asSSratad throng d more than ®° to ° veMc3es ut stU1 “at her in the day. during an hour- Mhed of France. First he Morlp Ropp n n the cruiser* and battleshlps 'Wlth 1:1 the greatest Invasion of aU specific. One report pkCMtb* 

eS^CQ-Rew Yorker* gathered Just “»“ted. and-twenty-mtaute session, by his reported the lWUon of Rome, iUdUC lldtC UU vivid flashes or lighting the huge reconjBd “«e. city of Liaienx, fifteen Sdb* 

C3=t of the square, at Madison n Marsha 1 Albert three top mill taxy men here. Gen- »«> *»ve the House the welcome m ,1 rp f M , iA shells were hurled into tbs shore Th » *» touching France and from th* coast, sooth of U 

Aveaua and Twenty-fourth Street. S* B 5 Wai ; •■ •***■» to abandon eral George C. Marshall, Army t ^at the most complicated 4tll A CTHl lSSUC installations. touching It hard In the historic K*vr» in 

cad ctorrred the invasion dn> ?“ 01 llaly let *" cWrf * *nwt J- “ d ^cult operation that Hu In Proving of M onnandy. along toe V - . 


Hh 


By Joseph Barae* 

rnm Ui Mirald I.'ftiM linu 
Copyrtsftt, IMS. Hnr Cork TrlbadB Zne 

LONDON, June 6 — To a tense 
but dulet House of Common* at 


By Jack Tait 

Me Tdolini to lit IIstsU T’ iM>i Co9r^r*(. /r«. fm Tort Trlhni /na, 

AT A 9TH AIR FORCE BOMBER BASE. England, June 6 — Down 
below toe first group of Marauder medium bombers to strike the 
Cherbourg peninsula at dawn today were the thin lines of invasion 
*craft pushing In to hit the sandy 

ti^ATTSi; Blink FlpPfpH laches a few minute. later. 
Uwdd the news m DUCK HiieCieU, Standing out from the shore. 


Wazi Rocket Shells, Allied Troops *nd tanks nrttrtS^T 
Fleres, Starlights and Afeore at xzia&y points tlooff 
Bomb, Joined in Di.pUy 100 toe Wonnwg 

r * rnaoi hafiitun T^a Him US 


Mph; 


coast between Le Havre aad 

By Joseph Driscoll Cherbourg. Allied hMdq^r- 

•v rtievtumi is thm gmM Tfibmnm ters is releasing few oetsik 

“ to the ectul pro*re»eJ 

, _ ^ ... ®dhe, June 6. operations, beyond expressing 
As I write this, our inlantry end v ”!r «*!*■*=•“** 

engineer* our tanks and ducks * ener « M*» ac ti on. 


The German radio is nan 


News on Inside Pages 


an encouraglnc report. Just be- 
fore the House rose he announced 


end ctorrred the invasion dnj ““ 01 ^ let l “ e cfU « « Admiral Ernest J. ^ n " In contrast, the peninsula itself Evince of Nonnandy. along toe T . 

iplto a ccmWnaUcn of adenmlty. ^ * pp ^ h P»d«>«uly King, commander in chief of toe «« occurred, as he termed toe 0rfej||> Canlw .|] in 11A< WM . dark and somber spot in toe ««t <>? the Bale de la Seine, J In ^ G<rrowu »P^ A 

Juhl l sC to a and seollment. dwe 10 the V6 ^fZi* " U3jarc f* Unlted States Fleet, and General J n ''" Ion ; w “ proceeding aecord- W»«rJ e * r,y w * ht ° r dBWB which clothed »t«mbing roughly from toe Port dozen landing* sioflg ** 

laC by Rccnsa CatooUc. Jewish ^ ^ Arnold, chief of the Army Repvibhcan Victory the owntijade. partly shrouded ° r Cherbourg to Le Havre, at the eighfcy-mile front They Mflt 

n»9 Protestant clergymen, the ^* lw ' ““ ° < f« W iS m lsw emve^toe Hol!^ rJTSmmnn, There in 32 Years in a tola, purple haze, only oc- ot thc River Seine, which the western end bitter figtt- 

3*32, so&tkK crowd prayed lor cm pegs II. eohmnW {Continued on page 10. column 6/ casionally was there a sign of «. leads to Parle. inv 

Just and permanent victory, for toe t p.". -■£■,■!- j —a ■b=js= *■■- v:» j " ■ 1 1 ->-=^1 J 11 c ^ cn ^ 3 * ln * Just ^*7 For the first time in thirty-two tlon. The enemy guns responded w ® have toe fl«t iteo m ^ '* on * „ 

esnvival of American flehting men. I Zl “ . . ~ « ff 1 S year*. Republicans carted toe feebly. the Coo word Care n ten -VstegMa ro*d, « 

Mnycr lnOuardlfl. who presided. B N&WS 071 1 USUI P lOUPS 1 ™ at 11 ' ** CtmgTW EHstrtct 111 »■»- 1 ““d® two trips to the penis- many more steps must follow be- tte CberbontHporinatlla. *ft». 

road messages from to* people ol 0 i vCHtfi OPsl A BtatWC 1 g elecUon when sul* today with Marauders of the fore final emu rOgd. Route 13. i* the m*i& 

S^r York to G^al Dwight D. I tu utgra au a^ss tru m-- rmnrnrr nrnrr, . ■ ■ im ^ ■"-» B ' ^Publican flth Air Pbroe. syrtemaUatoy dis- Cherbourg ^ highway from P*r>. to 0*f , 

^mtoower and PresMent Roost- THE INVASION CITY AND VICINITY «tlri*c^mEn- «“P*hmin* against a fourth patched to uproot gun emplace- subjected to heavy aerial bom! bourg. ValoETiee U only tWv* 

vait. Germans fear Allies will make a Coming Glass Works la named in ner." term u a step on tbs unhappy men is and tend them skyward bankseats, but toe beachheads we mi Im 

Astoems Are Sons ® udflen Iot *■•«« a suit for 334 J00.CCO. Page 13 He ^ y, e channel crotstaas road * ^ctalerahlp." easily de- under a great concentration of are fighting for are to bet™, Ir ° m t “ , 

T?t«, the anih«r» °<»»aopeopie angered by Narte' Five city weigher* are suspended had been made with HMUer losses fealcd ThomM Cantwell. Demo- high explosives. It was not pin- As we bring to Cotralor-Atlaek Reported 

■33CT the anthems were sung., admisElan of iwrae* Put 2 for outside work. hail m «n sms wbub imo . natnt hm«Hi n a .1 tt.. m tnzny more '«udiw<um« neponm 


3332. polyglot crowd prayed for 
Jock and permanent victory, for toe 
arrival of American hfbtiny men. 
Mayer LoGuardla. who presided, 
read messages from the people of 
S&r York to General Dwight D. 
B tenh ower and President RoosC- 
w3L 


Ai rt h em s Are Sang f 

Tlea the anthems were sung: 
" a CcC Save toe King” for the 
^tish, the "InteniaaoBaie" far 
es Stow ig ns . “The Star-Spangled 
Banner" for the Americans and. 
SsaEy. the one that seemed to 

a: '■ toe people most poignantly 
~"Za Mareefllalae T 

Sts French sailors, uniformed to 
tl ear. Jaunty color*, standing 
sader toe French Tricolor nd 
tos cron of Lorraine flag of toe 
Tfehttog French, to front of the 
staotL stead smartly at salute dur- 
fEC too playtog and tinging of the ! 
QCtoezs of toe France that used! 
%9 fee. 

VThen toe anthem was done, 
and a great cheer sounded from 
the crowd, two at the sltan Jtench- 
za shoK homeland once again 
fis a batt leground to a war of 
OsatteL bowed their head* and 
tripod tears from their eye*. 


THE INVASION 
Germans fear A! ilea will make a 
sudden stab lot Paris. Page S 
German people angered by Nazis' 
ad m is ei ac of reverses. Face 2 
Weather still b a major worry: 

the Channel is tough. Pace 3 
Allies In complete control of air 
aver northern France. Page 4 
Attack Is spearheaded by cloud- 
burst of sky troops. Page 4 
300 0-8., British warships escort- 
ed 6.000 invasion craft. Page 6 
Infantry was given job of blast- 
ing Nazi pill boxes. Page 8 
News of D Day spurs war work- 
ers to greater efforts. 1 Page 7 
Elsenhower tells patriots libera- 
tion flght has begun, rage 8 
Londoners amaze observers by 
taking news so calmly. Page 9 
Invasion brings sense of relief to 
the Algiers Flench. Page 9 
Incredible supply task set the 
stage for the Invasion, page 10 
Russians rejoice at invasion and 
anas tor own drive. Page II 


CITY AND VICINITY 


Corning Glass Works la named In ner.' 


for outside work. Page 13 
Invasion quickens tempo of West 
Point commencement. Page 17 


*«*2 than had been expected, that American Labor party point bombing of toe gun am- thousands of men. n^Ztot our ITh« Raman T«m*eaafi 

bombing and naval fire had re- ca S^ dlte ; placements. Many were destroyed, beaches will be extended. J„ B . G€rm * D . Trmn ^f*j£ 

” dueed the danger from shore bat- The vote was: kJ^LST* !“ ***>-* l*r twenty hourTpSr to our k "2 Agengy in » 

terlss and that Allied troops had Buck - Rep 14,269 by another twelve hours later, landings Allied Air Forces broadcast, heard in Laooso 

already moved several miles In- Cantwell. D.-A. L. p .. . 16.7S4 fContirtnedonpaffe4. column it (Con tinued owwaae.g qj. Wly Wedneadv, arid.'tW 

land. The outstanding feature Two year* ago the late Rome- ~ ‘ “ — — — fierce Ge rman counter-attack* 

of the air-borne tr oop * , era tic and American labor party ! Invaders Capitalize on Weak Spots launched «ni^ 

SSSMS s . *» Germans' Beach Defense System ““ t ~ P ‘ “ 

been seen so far in toe world." majority of 8.694 voter. (Just after midnight, ti» 

The tone of both the Prime Mr. Buck, who recently refused By loo S. Disher weakest points in the *8«nCy Continued, Strong G«f- 

Minister's reports was summed up to stand for a third term as SUPREME Headquarters, cham. ™ man bomber formatlona - at- 

to his concluding sentence, pro- president of the Board of Edu- Allied Expeditionary Foret, Ame The Germans reportedly tacked Allipd wmhin. mid 

nouneed Just before the House ad- cation, swept Stolen Island, where « (UP) .-The Germans, tn plan- their hoariest IS landing «.« ? f 

Journed tonight. "This la," he' toe bulk ol toe vote wu cut. He ning their beach defease*, tort a French side of toeaSS 2? £f ^ f { 

(Continued on page 9. column 2/ ( (Continued on page 2S. column It number of fundamental weak 8®cond priority was given *j Mine Qa ^ north Of Id 

• I 1 - — - 1 spots, among toss the ahaliow Seine Estuary and the pore t ** avre - "DetaOs are purposely 

y defense systems ol the coastal Cherbow*. Other areas were del kept h * dl M yet, but result* 

To Our Readers Itrengpoint* between major ports, vetoped to a lesser extent and at were good,” the iRKf 

____T 16 w abcto,cd at fiw«uwte* » U ton date^nd ltu bJSvai Added.) . 

The New York Herald Tribune is omitting all sdvertWnz ^ Indi c ati on s, the Allies Allied armies are repmrtMtettU^ said tha t ^All^nnara r hnti^ 

« - w SfSXf ZJ?%£ "ZJV' 

in order to provide adequate news spice ind wider distribution Atlantic Wall defensive system infantry, and their aapportmS 1ram the coast BB& * 

oi the newspaper « this historic moment. This is done with the upon retention and defense of weapons consist primm-fly^ri third Of the way to Faria from 

rf « 4MT -*«*-■ I report mH 

— S * nnlB bttran ' * “* ^ 


r ^s*^ssss. oi “p s?» aatsT-fifiSSs " »»» 

.. rm ^ a > already moved several miles In- Cantwell. D.-A. L. p .. . 16.764 

NATIONAL lend The outstondlng feature Tw0 5 ,etn a* 0 toe late Repre- 

Thlrteen loan cnalns are Indicted of the attack, be said, was "the sentatlve James A. O’Leary, Demo- 
in anti-trust suit. Pate 13 i«.ni<fag » of the air-borne tr oop * , era tic and American labor party 

tot?*? « which 01 w««e. on a scale candidate, won over Robert BJ 
AvJf II r “ tar « er to an anything that has Woodward. Republican with a 

SlitotoJw L. B^Se S been seen so far in toe world." majority of 8.694 voter. 

^ *" The tone ot both the Prime Mr. Buck, who recently refused | 
8 ports Minister's reports was summed up to stand for a third term as, 


Air-borne troops give Nazis taste P*ae 

of CTOto In reverse. Fogs 11 Editorials ...11 Books 
w .„ Sumner We-es 17 Pood . 

“*«• lltlnr VllMf Ml 


SPORTS 

All major sports postponed u In- 
vasion day arrives. Para 29 
Brookhatton wins Red Crocs 
soccer on toss of coin. Page IS 
Another Viewpoint, y Jesse 
Abramson. Page if 

EDITORIALS AND MISCELLANY 
Page Page 

Editorials ... u Books isj 

Sumner We”es 17 Food 31 

Major Euot.. .17 Society is 


S3tw York’s reactions to the In- American Relief for Italy. Inc., jin Short 17 Anuuem’to .13 


rote, news of which arrived first 
lay radio from German sources at 
ISJTasL and from Allied sources 
at 3:33 a. m_, were "»»"t and 

rConitntM-a i n page T. column $; 


may receive $1,600,000. Page n [Sullivan 17 Fresh Air.. .". !if 


Japanese drive to Changsha’s Bridge 15 Real rsfa tn 26 

defenses; dials near. Fags 11 Webster 25 Radio fig 

Bodoslio redans but wiD form a "Mr.and 34rs.”24 OWtuaiiei " ”l* 

ngO OnemntBt. Fag* 11 Nature story . .1* Financial ia-23 

War communiques. Page 16 Purele S3 Business .\ lj-fifi 


War communiques. 


^Orth 


°nii 1 


To Our Readers 


The New York Herald Tribune is omitting all sdvertSdn^ 
except classified and record financial ropy from today's edition? 
in order to provide adequate news space and wider distribution 
ti the newspaper at this historic moment. This is done with the 
CO-operatian of our regular display advertise 1 ** 



IN THE NEW YORK HERALD TRIBUNE 


Because the Paris-based European Edition 
of the newspaper did not publish 
during the war, these pages axe taken Man 
from the archives of its parent 
newspaper published in New York. K , 


Follow the news of the D-Day landings in Normandy 
exactly as it appeared on the from pages in |une 1944, These 


commemorative front page reprints from the archives will 
appear every day from June 5tn through June 1 1 th. 

This way, our readers will be able to follow their 
excitement, successes and setbacks as the troops established 
beachheads across a 75-mile stretch of the Normandv coast. 


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1944) printed on glossy paper, i 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 7 , 1994 


Page 5 



5al tle Rawing 
V ^aOCente 
^liles Inland 

lfT ' of 4,000 Vari, 
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f akf Armt to Frut 

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V 


MCKTO NORMANDY/ 


For Canada, a Coming of Age in War 


By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

, •'***' *«rk 7;i*jm Sen/.? 

tand Prince Edward 1$- 
^ d RmifSr C Corpp ? Kelvin Mactier. 23. of 

to Se > hLri 1 Peg r RincS ' g01 20 10 30 
T cl™?* CourscuIles-sur-Mer when 

Irftsi^fhis'? iper ? bullcl 5mai>hfid inl ° d* 
!2\K j • “J“si like setting hn 

on the head a sledgehammer.” he says 

JVit^nfr^ , mornin & June 6. 1944. Acting 
Officer Ivan Dohertv. 18. ^ « ffi 

gKLS" ° f - lhc 'Minesweeper 

iru5i? D ? I | elW ' *?• 3 navi £*tion officer, was 
KfPf^foiir^nguied Halifax bomber, from 
££^r a6ron of ^ ° r the Caiudl- 
? vcr ^^CaJajs. nan 
AN'edplan to fool tfae Germans uho 
thinking the invasion would take place there 
instead of Normandy. 

By land, sea and air. Canada's contributions 
were pivotal to D-Day and contributed impor- 
tantly not only to a sense of nationhood but to 
. Canada s evolving position in the hieraichv of 
nations. 

World War I. in which 500.000 Canadians 
volunteered from a population of 8 million, 
helped create a distinct Canadian identity dur- 
ing their four years of combat. 


But World War 11 — in which more than u 
million mm and women were in uniform over 
six years and 42,000 were killed — brought a 
new status. On D-Day. said Desmond Morton, 
a historian ai the University of Toronto, Cana- 
dians were there "as equals." 

“For the first time, Canadians bejym to feel 
they belonged where world decisions were 
mode." said the historian, a co-author of 
“Bloody Victory; Canadians in the D-Day 
Campaign." Only the United States and Britain 
committed more forces. 

Americans landed on Utah and Omaha 
Beaches, the British on Gold and Sword. Cana- 
da had Juno, between the two British sectors, 
onto which it threw 14,000 troops, including 
Mr. Mactier. then a farm boy from Manitoba. 

On that day, Canada suffered more than 
1,000 casualties, with 375 dead. Altogether, 
5.021 Canadian soldiers died during the Nor- 
mandy campaign. 

Mr. Mactier spent 12 hours on the beach. The 
bullet knocked out four teeth, went through his 
tongue and broke his jaw. When he heard 
someone announce that a landing craft would 
take the walking wounded back to England, he 
crawled to it and finally got .some help from a 
couple of sailors. 

Patched up by plastic surgeons, he was back 
with his regimen! by September and continued 
fighting through to V-E Day. the announce- 
ment of victory in Europe on May H. 1945. “1 


feel I was very lucky” the retired electrician 
said by telephone from his home in Winnipeg. 

Mr. Doherty and Mr. Bigelow are retired 
businessmen in Charlottetown, where Mr. Do- 
herty once served as deputy mayor. 

Al though the 50th anniversary of D-Day will 
be widely marked in Canada, the fanfare, per- 
haps reflecting a Canadian penchant for under- 
statement. is likely to be less than in tbe United 
States, Britain, and France. Some commenta- 
tors muse that Canada's contributions will be 
overshadowed. 

"Will Canada he noticed?" The Globe and 
Mail asked in a front-page article. "Many veter- 
ans in this country believe that a certain shyness 
has marked the effort to tell the story of Cana- 
da's involvement.” 

Senator Jack Marshall, who represents west- 
ern Newfoundland and who landed with ihe 
North Shore (New Brunswick) Regiment on D- 
Day. said Canada’s plans "do not have the 
scope and momentum of our Ailio." 

But ceremonies and parades were planned 
for most tow ns and cities, and the federal gov- 
ernment has budgeted 53.6 million for events 
connected with the end of the war. 

On Friday. Prime Minister Jean Chretien is 
to unveil a monument in London to Canadian 
soldiers of the two world wars. On Monday, in 
Normandy, where he joined other world lead- 
ers, he laid a wreath on Juno beach belon: 
heading for the ceremony at Omaha Beach. 


\ 


V 









Macai Mcdn Kgemx 

A flight of nine military jets roaring over D-Day ceremonies Monday at Omaha Beach, framed by flags of some of (he Western Allies. 


Clinton Says Resistance 
Kept 'Freedom Alive’ 


Agente France Prase 

UTAH BEACR France —Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton paid tribute to 
the French Resistance on Monday 
in a Fren ch - American ceremony at 
Utah Beach, the second of the 
• beaches seized by American forces 
_ on D-Day 50 years ago. 

He said the Resistance kept 
“freedom's flame alive” in France 
at a terrible cost in German retri- 

D-Day Jumper 
Has Back Injury 

dgenoe France-Prase 

CAEN, France — A 70-year-old 
D-Day veteran who was hurt as he 
joined 41 other Americans in a re- 
enactment of their parachute jump 
50 years ago in Normandy has a 
back injury but no fracture, hospi- 
tal sources said Monday. 

The veteran, Earl W. Draper of 
Inverness, Florida, was taken to 
hospital in Caen after bang treated 
in a first-aid tent near Sainte-Mere- 
Eglise. where tire veterans jumped 
'on Sunday. The hospital said he 
had “tdephoned his wife and is 
even joking with nurses.” 

He sustained back injuries after 
his parachute, twisted; a? he was 
ccamng down. Rescue workers said 
three other American veterans who 
also jumped oa Sunday wen treat- 
ed for bruises or twisted ankles. 


bull on for those who sabotaged 
communications and supplies. 

He said that the Resistance had 
shown the way and that without it, 
D-Day would not have been possi- 
ble 

Mr. Clinton, feeling the cold in a 
blustering wind before the war me- 
morial here, repeated his tributes to 
U.S. and Allied troops already 
made at an American ceremony at 
the nearby Pointe-du-Hoc. 

"Thousands of people gave ev- 
erything they were or what they 
might nave been” so that freedom 
could win through, Mr. Clinton 
said. “To honor them we must re- 
member.” 

Addressing veterans at the cere- 
mony, lhc president declared; “The 
most difficult days of your lives 
brought us 50 years of freedom.” 

In a steady drizzle, a choir of the 
82d Airborne sang wartime lyrics 
like “Kiss Me Once, Kiss Me Twice 
and Kiss Me Once Again” and 
*Tm Beginning to See the Light" 

Utah Beach was captured with 
American losses of only 12 dead 
and 185 wounded. A first wave of 
U.S. soldiers was to take the beach 
at Samt-Martm-de-Varreville. In- 
stead, they landed two kflozneiers 
f 1 2. miles) to tire south at the wrong 
beach. It was a poorly defended site 
and ihe men- of the 4th Infantry 
Division of the U.S. 7th Corps un- 
der General J, Lawton GODins were 
able to take it quickly. 


For the French on D-Day , a Mix of Bittersweet Memories 


By Alan Riding 

New York Times Seme* 
OUISTREHAM, France — Of the 
1 56,000 Allied troops who landed in Nor- 
mandy on D-Day, only 177 were French, 
and survivors of their commando unit 
gathered Monday in the little port lhai 
they liberated on June 6. 1944. to be 
honored by President Franpois Mitter- 
rand for their heroism. 

But while there was wreath-laying, dis- 
tribution of medals and a rendering of 
“The Marseillaise." France's commemo- 
ration of its own role in D-Day could not 
help evoking the mixed feelings that the 
event still stirs among many French. 

Inevitably, it is a painful reminder that 
a weak and divided France capitulated 
swiftly in face of German might in June 
1940. But for many older Gauliists and 
other French patriots, it is almost os 
bruising to French honor that Fiance was 
freed by the “Anglo-Saxons.” as it calls 
the Americans and British. 

In Normandy, too, D-Day awakens 
bittersweet memories. The Germans were 


driven from the region during two 
months of fierce fighting, but in the prin- 
cess 14.000 civilians were killed — 3.800 
on June 6 and 7 alone — and Caen. St. L6 
and many smaller towns were destroyed 
by Allied bombardment. 

But eagerness to participate in the cele- 
bration was evident in Ouistreham. with 
thousands crowding a plaza where 56 
members of the so-called Kieffer Compa- 
ny. wearing green berets and medals, 
were given a place of honor in homage to 
their role 50 years ago. 

Named after its commander. Major 
Philippe Kieffer. the company came 
ashore on two landing craft west of here, 
neutralized a German gun position and 
by early afternoon on D-Day had given 
Ouistreham a footnote in history as the 
first French town liberated by the French 
from German occupation. 

Addressing the crowd. Mr. Mitterrand 
said that, while in no way minimizing 
France's debt to its allies, the Kieffer 
Company. 400 other French paratroops 
who were dropped into Brittany and. not 
least, tens of thousands of members of 


the French Resistance had also contrib- 
uted io the liberation of France. 

D-Day. however, is not the day that 
the French state prefers to commemo- 
rate. Rather, its main celebration will 

D-Day is not the day 
that the French state 
prefers to 

commemorate. Rather, 
its main celebration 
■will take place on Aug. 

25 to mark the 50th 
anniversary of the 
liberation of Paris. 

take place on Aug. 25 to mark the 50th 
anniversary of the liberation of Paris by 
French forces led by General Philippe 
LeClerc. At present, there is no plan to 
invite any foreign leaders. 


Yet the official French interpretation 
of the liberation of Paris also well illus- 
trates bow French perceptions of World 
War If have been altered by what a suc- 
cession of governments, starting with 
that of General Charles de Gaulle in 
1944, saw as a need to restore French 
pride after the occupation. 

In practice, the stage was set for the 
liberation of Paris when American forces 
punched out of Normandy around Atm. 
8, 1944, and quickly advanced towards 
the capital By then. General Leclerc had 
landed 16,000 Free French in Normandy 
and was authorized by Allied command- 
ers to enter Paris first. 

Even this version, though, fails to take 
into account tbe initial reluctance of both 
Winston Churchill and F ranklin D. Roo- 
sevelt to allow Genera] de Gaulle to play 
any role in D-Day. From ins exile in 
London, the general blocked an Allied 
plan to place France under mfliiary occu- 
pation and insisted on restoring French 
administration. 

But he was not permitted to set foot in 


France until June 14 — two da vs after 
Churchill visited the front — and this 
merely deepened his determination to 
underline his independence from both 
London and Washington. 

More than anyone, then, it was Gener- 
al de Gaulle who fed the myth that most 
French were in the Resistance and only a 
handful of traitors — some 10,000 were 
executed — collaborated with the enemy. 

Mr. Mitterrand, who worked for Vichy 
before joining the Resistance in 1942. has 
often questioned the purpose of reopen- 
ing old wounds and has urged the French 
to look forward, above all to a united 
Europe founded on the new alliance be- 
tween the historical enemies, France and 
Germany. 

German leaders were not invited to the 
ceremonies, but Mr. Mitterrand would 
have hked Chancellor Hdmut Kohl to be 
here as a symbol that the past is indeed 
tbe past. As a gesture to Germany, he has 
invited German troops belonging to a 
European army corps to march down the 
Champs-EIysefe on July 14, Bastille Day. 
this year. 


North Korea Links 
Sanctions mid War 


D-Day and Overlord , 
Neptune and Bolero 

New fork Tima Service 

The Allied invasion of France was an extraordinary endeavor, but 
the expression “D-Day" has a rather ordinary history. The term had 
been used long before June 6, 1944. 

D-Day arispxvaUy meant nothing more than the day on which an 
envisioned military operation would be started. 

Phrases using repetitive initials go back at least as far as World 
War I and may have first been used in a SepL 7, 1918, field order of 
the Allied Expeditionary Force involving the campaign at the St 
Miliiel salient in France. “Tbe First Army will attack at H-Hour oa 
D-Day,” the order read. 

Because the Normandy invasion was such a momentous operation 
— tbe day of all days, so to speak — the phrase D-Day became 
associated with it. 

Tbe invasion also spawned numerous code names. 

The overall plan was called Overlord, a Churchill touch. The 
setiborne assault was Operation Neptune. The buildup in Britain was 
Bolero. 

Tbe American beaches were Omaha and Utah, the British beaches 
Gold .ind Sword, the Canadian beach Juno. 

The artificial harbors set down off the beaches were known as 

^Tbmrwas even a code name for something that never existed. This 
was Fortitude South, an Allied scheme in which a mythical army, 
supposedly under General George S. Patton, was simulated in 
southeastern England by dummy landing craft, inflatable rubber 
nmtts. and phony wireless communications. 

The idea was to convince tbe German commanders that the 
invasion could Well come at Calais — across the narrowest part of 
the English Channel — so that tens of thousands of German troops 
would De kept on guard there, far from Normandy. 

It worked, helping make June 6, 1944, tbe biggest D-Day of them 
alL 


By.T, R. Reid 

Washington Pan Service 

TOKYO — North Korea turned 
to tbe rhetorical heal once again in 
the dispute over its nuclear re- 
search facilities, warning Monday 
that international sanctions against 
it would “mean war.” 

In a broadcast from Pyongyang 
that was recorded in Tokyo, North 
Korea's state-run press agency. 
KCNA, said that “sanctions are 
immediately^ war, and war is mer- 
ciless-" If sanctions are imposed, 
the message said, the result would 
determine “tbe survival or ruin of 
the 70 mUKoas” living on the Kore- 
an Peninsula. 

South Korea, a Western-allied 
democracy, has about 45 million 
people, and the Communist dicta- 
torship of North Korea has a popu- 
lation about half as big. 

For more than a year now, North 
Korea's government has veered 
wildly back and forth between con- 
ciliation and belligerency toward 
the United States and its allies. 

Analysts say this may reflect a 
deliberate effort to confuse oppo- 
nents. On the other hand, it may 
reflect an ongoing policy battle 
within the North Korean regime. 

As evidence that the North Ko- 
reans are divided among them- 
selves, a development official rep- 
resenting the United Nations was 
left coding his heels in Tokyo on 
Monday after Pyongyang abruptly 
denied an entry visa that the offi- 
cial had been promised weeks ago. 

The UN official had been invited 
to visit Pyongyang by one senior 
figure in the North Korean govern- 
ment. Bat when he was ready to 


board a plane as scheduled this 
weekend, another branch of North 
Korea's government abruptly can- 
celed his entry permit. 

This kind of internal squabbling 
within the isolated North Korean 
regime demonstrates how difficult 
it may be to work out an agreement 
on the nuclear dispute. 

Top officials of Japan's govern- 
ment, meanwhile, met Monday io 
consider whether to impose a fi- 
nancial embargo against North 
Korea even without a formal UN 
call for sanctions. 

The Japanese have promised to 
gp along with any UN embargo. 
But UN action seems dubious now 
because China is unwilling to sup- 
port it That led Washington to 
■propose that the United States, Ja- 
pan, and South Korea form an ad- 
hoc alliance to approve their own 
sanctions. 

Japan's foreign minister, Koji 
Kakrzawa, said last week that To- 

S ro may move to sanctions against 
orth Korea under the three-coun- 
try aegis without a UN order. This 
comment produced mild opposi- 
tion from the political left, which 
has traditionally supported North 
Korea. But tbe response was so 
muted that Japan may be willing to 
along with a three-couniry em- 


EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


RUNS 


A CUSTOM-DESIGNED 
International IS. IS. A. 

American Program ano teaching approach : 

■ Oum.mJinu faculty Liking on individual interest 
in each snidcni : all course, given in English. 

A choice of 3 Majors : 

■ M.magcmcn (/Marketing, international 
Business. Econumio/Finance. 

■ Npcdaimirion in culrunr and languages of EEC the Americas, Far-East. 

Flexible scheduling : 

■ Intensive program : 2 and 1/2 to 4 years. 

N Part-time program : at y,iur own pace. ■ 

The International B.B. A. leads to : 

■ 1SG‘> International MBA (French Government Accredited), - 

or an Artu-ricjn MBA (AACSB j ' credited'. I 


INTERNATIONAL 
BACHELOR OF 


North Yemen Declares a Cease-Fire 


SAN'A. Yemen — Northern Ye- 
men oo Monday announced & um- 
laieral ceasefire in its month-old 
civil war with the secessionist south 
in complianc e with last week’s 

UnitedNatioflS resolution. 
“We.have informed the secre- 
geoeral of the United Nations 
tbe secretary-general of the- 


they would push for action against 

any side that failed to heed the UN 

truce .call 

Referring to the southerners, Mr. 
Bassandwah said, he thought that 
the statement by the Guff Arab 
states would “encourage the muti- 
neers.” 


Northern and southern Yemen, 
which merged to form a united 
smte in 1990, have been at war with 
each other since May 4. Southern 
leaders, accusing the north of try- 
ing to annex the south under the 
cover of unity, announced on May 
21 that the sooth was breaking 
stray to form a new state. 

Tse north says the southern 


^ __ *We wffl atforce it as far as we 

Arab League that a’^ase-fire win are concerned,” he said, noting that leadera are rebels against ihe legiii- 
start frommidnigfct tonight," the. the reaction of ^“mutineers” was male government of Yemen, 
northern foreign nririistff/Moham- 

jned Salem Bassandwah, said. 

It’s an open-ended cease-Sre, 


The chid step for Japan, if it did 
agree to sanctions, would be to out- 
law cash deliveries from Japan to 
North Korea. At present, Japanese 
residents carry an estimated 5600 
million or more each year (o North 
Korea. A ban on these transfers 
would cut Pyongyang's most lucra- 
tive source of hard currency. 

Japan has pul together a 10- 
poim package of economic sanc- 
tions it may impose on the North. 
The ban on cash transfers is the 
most serious element. 

The plan also calls for limits on 
flights from Japan to North Korea, 
restrictions on sport and cultural 
exchange, and ugfat limits on ex- 
port of “dual use” items that have 
both civilian and military uses. But 
these points would ban things that 
rarely happen now anyway. 

Japanese officials said they 
would still prefer to have a UN 
sanctions resolution before putting 
their own sanctions 


mirwrlatrL 


regime into 

(AP, AFP, Reuters ) place. 


by fftBSEfiSSSS Government Force Counterattacks in Rwanda 


adopted 


The resolution was 
Wednesday by the Security Coon- . The Associated Press 

ciL It called far an immediiue jjQALI, Rwanda — Govan- 
oease-flre in tbe war, which broke mBnl forces launched a major 
out between northern and southern ■ counterattack in southern Rwanda, 
Yemeni forces on May 5, and the fo-a tag offensive since the 
sending of a fact-finding misaon. <xMfiitt resumed two months ago, a 
•The cease-fire wHl last until the UN official said Monday, 
other side ceases to abide by it,” Matjor Jean-Guy Plante of the 
Mr. Bassandwah «*« = "Th® 1 


Arm't think it will be possible for us the 450-man United Nations force 

■ 1 •• rii Bonnrta cfliri ih 


for 


Canadian Army, a 
the 450-man Unne 

-2SSfc wo* .o»jta£. Fro ”' 


states issued a‘ statement on 
Yemeni war on Sunday. -They said 


He said the annjfa mortar attack 


on a UN flight carrying an Italian 
delegation Sunday at the Kigali air- 
port may have been pan of tbe 
overall plan to boost the morale of 
government troops- 

Two shells exploded around the 
plane just after it arrived, and ihe 
UN issued a strong protest. Tbe 
plane was forced to leave without 
unloading passengers or cargo, but 
there were no injuries. 

Major Plante said there had been 
heavy fighting about 20 kilometers 
north of Kigali, but had no details. 


Fighting has been intense 
around the dty of Gitarama. the 
provisional seat of the Hutu-domi- 
nated Rwandan government. The 
Tutsi-led rebels captured the near- 
by town of Kabgayi last week, but 
rebel forces there were still aiming 
under shell fire from government 
positions in Gitarama. - 

Major General Romeo Dallaire. 
the Canadian who commands UN 
forces in Rwanda, said cease-fire 
talks between die government mili- 
tary forces and the rebels would 
resume Wednesday. 



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Page 6 


•' '4'- 


TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 1994 




INTERNATIONAL && o 



PUBLISHED WITH TIIK M-.U ViKli T1MKS ANf> Tlifr. WASHINGTON JUKI 


It was a battle on a titanic scale, its name as 
resonant as Yorklowo and Trafalgar. Water- 
loo and Gettysburg. It proved decisive on the 
Western front in a war unequaled for its 
mortal toll and global reach. It was a master- 
piece of organization, its inevitable blunders 
in execution redeemed by ordinary Ameri- 
cans. Britons and Canadians on code-named 
beaches that have become legend: Utah. 
Omaha, Gold. Sword and Juno. 

Even so. the 50th anniversary of the Nor- 
mandy invasion is rightly being remembered 
in print and on prime lime as more than a feat 
of arms. It reminds us anew that given the 
right challenge and leadership, democracies 
can prevail together against daunting odds, if 
their will and resources are great enough. 

The successful storming of Hitler’s Atlan- 
tic Wail was in no sense predestined. "My 
dear friend.” a worried Winston Churchill 
confided to President Franklin Roosevelt in 
October 1943, “this is much the greatest 
thing we have ever attempted.’' Britons be- 
lieved they knew better than American; the 
formidable hazards of a cross-Channel inva- 
sion against entrenched German defenders. 
Nor were these anxieties lessened when Roo- 
sevelt named Dwight Eisenhower as the su- 
preme commander of Operation Overlord. 

General Eisenhower had scam battlefield 
experience; only three years before he had 
been an obscure colonel. But what was true of 
Ike was true of .Americans in general. Stephen 
Ambrose, the historian, recalls what most of 
us have forgotten: "We won because we pro- 
duced an army out of scratch. 160.000 men at 
the beginning of the war. We ranked loth in 
the world, behind Romania, but grew to an 
army of 8 million by 1944 that was magnifi- 
cently equipped, marvelously trained." 

In the event, just as Pearl Harbor ended 
America’s illusions of invulnerability, so D- 
Day confirmed .America's emergence as leader 
of the WesL And it forged in bailie a new 
citizen army. Under General Eisenhower. Nor- 
mandy was chosen as landing target: an inva- 
sion armada of thousands of ships and a multi- 
national army of 175,000 were readied for the 
crucial first day. By this time, to be sure. Hitler 
had lost 2 million soldiers in the East as Russia 
triumphed at Stalingrad. But if Overlord had 
foundered, it would have taken a year to mount 
a fresh assault, and millions more would have 
perished in a protracted global conflict. 

Ail sides stumbled in the chaotic aftermath 
of D-Day. For a perilous moment, the .Allies 
feared they were losing. The Germans fought 


tenaciously: according to the British D-Day 
historian Max Hastings. “Whenever British or 
■American troops met the Germans in anything 
like equal strength, the Germans prevailed." 

This was not surprising, given Germany's 
martial traditions, its batik-tested officer 
corps and fool soldiers bred to obedience. 
Far more striking was the fighting ability 
shown by America's young citizen army. In 
the end. success or failure of Overlord, writes 
Mr. Ambrose, “came down to a relatively 

small number nf junior officers, noneoms. 
and privates or seamen in the American. 

British and Canadian armies It ai! came 

down to a bunch of IS- to 20-year-olds." 

They did noi fail, although they died by 
scores in the riptides of Omaha, on the cliffs at 
Pointe du Hoc and all up and down that bleak 
shore. Finally, in a terrible and sacred effort, 
this boyish army rose to the supreme chal- 
lenge of infan to' warfare. They advanced into 
the sweeping volleys of fortified defender*. 

What lifted and moved them went beyond 
military science, courage and fear into ihe 
realm of the Intangible. Overlord could net 
have succeeded without the mortar of trust 
and shared \alues. Even with a million Yank* 
in Britain, a common civility filtered through 
the ranks, from General Eisenhower to the 
lowliest private. That invader; were liberators 
was confirmed by the jubilation among occu- 
pied peoples as the Allies thrust toward Germa- 
ny. where the criminal character or the Nazi 
regime was made manifest in the death camps. 

Not just might prevailed on the red beaches 
of Normandy. With hindsight, no doubt Roo- 
sevelt and Churchill can be faulted for wishful 
thinking about their Soviet partner, and their 
optimism about the peace to come. But the 
Allied bond was with the Soviet people. 

No matter what was fumbled in the negotia- 
tions. we know now dial the armies of the West 
preserved the template of freedom that in thi< 
decade would draw- the gaze of old Russia itself. 

It is of enormous importance in today's disor- 
dered world to remember that democracies 
have achieved great objectives against impos- 
ing odds, that passion for freedom can defeat 
the efficiencies of the psychopathic autocrat. 

The television pictures of old men revisiting 
the beaches where they fought lift the heari 
almost to breaking. In their 70s and SOs now . 
they weep at the memory of what the living 
and dead did on French shores on June 6. 
1944. They weep for what was lost there that 
day. and for what was saved. 

— THE SEW YORK TI MES. 



Clinton 


and Asia: Real Progress, but Trou 




TASHiNGTON — The con- 
ventional wisdom is ‘dial the 
Clinton administration has horribly 
bungled its dealings with East Asia, 
it has surrendered" to China on hu- 
man rights, it has rigged and tagged 
in its Trade strategy" with Japan, it 
has temporized with North Korea 
and in general il has illustrated w hat 
“poiicy disarray” means. 

The reality is both better and 
worse. It is better in that the admin- 
istration has avoided several pitfalls 
in Asia and has attained several sig- 
nificant goals. It is worse in that the 
challenges soon to come from East 
Ada will involve issues more funda- 
mental than one U.S*. president's op- 
erating style. 

The administration may be shy 

about emphasizing its recent success- 
es with Asia because each is embar- 
rassing or awkward ic mention. For 
example, ending the trade embargo 
against Vietnam increased .America’s 
economic and political leverage in 
Asia, but President Bi!i Clinton prob- 
ably prefer* not to highlight anything 
Involving s ii-tr.om. 

A more significant achievement is 
the new “framework" agreement for 
trace with Japan. For decades. U.S. 
and Japanese negotiators have wran- 
gled over which was more important 
— now hard Japan tried to open its 
markets, or v. ha: the results of those 
efforts were, a year ago. the United 
Stats; .wn car.ce J :rat 't would con- 
centrate on results, no: efforts. 

Last month, whine a variety of 
face-saving pleasantries. Japan final- 
ly agreed ic this approach. The cam- 
ouflage consisted mainly of U.S. 
promises no: to use any one number 
in measuring results, os tne Reagan 
arimLnh traitor, had done with semi- 
conductors. Instead, the United 
States will combine several measures. 
But since the Japanese government 
had spent the previous months de- 
claring that it would never, ever agree 
to 2 "results” approach, the Clinton 
administration is now tactfully soft- 
pedaling what it achieved. 

even the end of the administra- 
tion* China drama was something 
other than the humiliating sellout 
generally portrayed in ihe .American 
press. Here the problem was the pres- 
ident’s 1993 promise to remove Chi- 
na’s mosi-favered-naUon trade status 
if the regime did not liberalize. 

Front the moment that promise 


By James Fallows 


was made, it was viewed throughout 
East .Asia as being unenforceable. 
Denying the trade "privileges would 
be a declaration of economic war: 
Almost the only countries that do 
not enjoy such benefits are those 
whose governments the United 
States has tried to overthrow, like 
Cuba and North Korea. Neither 
China nor its neighbors believed 
that the United Slates was ready for 
such an all-out confrontation with 
China. The president made himself 
and the country seem less paper- 
tigerish by getting out of this unwise 
commitment. But since he set the 
trap in the first place, he can hardly 
brag about the escape. 

Now the real difficulties begin, 
based not on subtleties of U.S. poli- 
cy but on fundamental changes in 
economic strength. The two great 
phenomena of modem Asia — its 
rapid growth and its increasing re- 
gional 'integration — will lead to 
more and more political showdowns 
with the United States. 

America’s relief at Japan's sup- 
posed economic collapse ha? dulled 


awareness of how powerfully the 
whole East .Asian region continues 
to grow. Savings rates in East Asa 
are, on average, three tunes as high 
as in the United States. Asians share 
of the world’s investable capital has 
more than doubled in the past de- 
cade. East Asian countries are the 
world's main growth markets for 
airplanes, cars, cellular phones and 
construction equipment. 

It is because Japanese companies 
dominate these Asian markets so 
thoroughly — just look at the cars 
on the jammed roads of Thailand 
and Indonesia — that they have 
maintained their global market 
share in most manufacturing indus- 
tries despite ihe slowdown at home. 

Most East Asian countries stfll 
rely on the United States as their 
most important customer. Last year 
Japan had a trade surplus of more 
than S50 billion with the United 
Slates: taken together, the rest of the 
region did, too. Yet in all of these 
countries, trade with .America is fall- 
ing in relative importance, and trade 
within Asia continues to grow. Ja- 


pan sends twice as large a share of 
its foreign investment to Asia as n 
did a decade ago. and has as a 
trade surplus with the rest of Asa as 
with the United States. Companies 
in South Korea, Taiwan and Hong 
Kong now have brandies in China, 
Malaysia and Vietnam. 

Despite the jealousies and differ- 
ences that separate Japan from Chi- 
na or Thailand from Vietnam, their 
economies also share a conscious- 
ness of having history on their aoe 
—which makes them more assertive 
about redressing history's griev- 
ances. A principal grievance, bandy 
recognized in tne united States, in- 
volves the centuries in which first 
Europe and then America set the 
rules for international behavior. 

What was “fair” in worid_ trade, 
what was “humane” in domestic poli- 
cies. was defined by the Westffners. 
with their machines and money. 
Wien Asian governments fell short 
of these standards —locking up dis- 
sidents. ri gging trade to promote 
their own industries — they had w 
apolo gize for not yet having evolved 
lo full. Western refinement! 

Now the apologies are over. On 




matters from dealing with vandals:, 
to censoring newspapers. jOTe . 
Asian governments are asserave 
about having found what they to a- ' 
SStter^ay.M^yWoletM: ; 

will inevitably become more EteaL 
In parts of Asia this may rumotri.be 
uye. For instance, in South 
Christianity raises a seno» 
lengf to the power of the state, ftrfv, 
in many other countries — Taiwan. 
Singapore. Malaysia 
ened authoritarianism^" w hiat ea*.-.- 
ricbes the economy white ftriitn®,? 
individual rights, could test far 
years and years. 

The Asian episodes of the test few ;;! 
months, from caning in Singapore^ 
to trade benefits for China, give- 
Washington a taste of what ltwfflbei' 
like to coexist with this increasiB^.^ij 
self-confident system. . •: 7 

For the Untied Slates, the easiest?, 
part of the job will be ceaii^.?gft . 
trade disputes. ’Daou^h East Asifs^, 




, 6codwe 
WERE ABLE 
pmVETHIS 
IMETALX! 



economic strength is the 
political confidence, track; cqa£ 
plaints do noi strike at the heart <£»;-• 
country's internal order. WashhtgtMT- 
could impose sanctions on Bqj g c glter 
wholesale copyright piracy crochet^ 
aggressive trade practices waboBt J 
provoking the snarling. .response: tjEYf. 
the most-!avored-D2tk)9 comrov 

Defending Western poHticdl 

ues will be harder and wfll-requijci 'v 
shift in the American laoitajit&T&Yij 
United States often cboosesnot 
intervene — in Hungary e> ISSb.lpY 
Bosnia and Rwanda today — buiil£ j 
political culture often assumes thait\y j 
America could win any. fight ar; ; .-j 
change any outcome if it choye to.- 

For the foreseeable future, th 
United States cannot control- ttafcv; 
politics ot East Asia. Ii vanno? 
redly force China lo liberalize. -It' 7 ' 
cannot prevent a shift of economic J 
mommimn to a region Chat is now" 
celebrating authoritarianism. • ■ ’V;-.’" 

Americi will have to lean) how to 
keep speaking up for liberal values J- 
and devising indirect means to ad-' 
vaace them, knowing that in they 
short run, no matter bow skillful its ; . 
leaders, it will probably faiL 

Mr. Fallows is author of ‘"Looking .{ 
at the Sun. : Tne Rise o f the East. . 

Asian Economic and Political Sji : " 
tern. "He contributed this comment to ‘ 
The New York Times. 




Korea; The Danger I§ Acute and America Should Prepare 


North Korea has flagrantly and deliberate- 
ly broken the rules by which ihe world is 
trying to prevent Lhe spread of nuclear weap- 
ons. President Bill Clinton is right to demand 
sanctions, but to be effective, sanctions will 
require vigorous enforcement by China. Ja- 
pan and Russia. Mr. Clinton has to build an 
alliance among a group of countries that are 
all, in varying degrees, unenthusiasue and 
disinclined to take real action. 

But to fail to respond lo North Korea’s 
transgressions would be horribly dangerous, 
especially for its neighbors. If the North 
Koreans can build warheads with impunity, 
they already have missiles capable of reach- 
ing Beijing. Osaka and Vladivostok. And lhe 
risks do not end at the 1,000-kilometer radi- 
us. The North Koreans have been willing to 
sell missiles to anyone with cash, and might 
be ready to do the same with warheads. If the 
world lets their present behavior pass without 
response, it might as well abandon any further 
attempts to enforce the Nuclear Nonprolifer- 
ation Treaty where it counts. That will send an 
unambiguous message to Iran, Iraq, Libya 
and all the other despotisms with large ambi- 
tions and scores to settle. 

The North Koreans have said they would 
regard sanctions as an act of war. That would 
be national suicide, but it is impossible to be 


sure that they would not attack. The United 
Slates has rightly said ihat the rest of lhe 
world cannot allow that kind of threat to deier 
penalties for violating a crucial treaty, it is. 
unfortunately, worth chancing a war to en- 
force the nuclear rules in North Korea, just as 
it was worth a war to enforce ihera in Iraq. 

In Iraq, the United Stales was able :o orga- 
nize rapidly an alliance that drew on some of its 
long-standing NATO allies in Europe, as well 
as .Arab countries that it had armed or other- 
wise helped over the years. Building a similar 
alliance in the Pacific will be much harder. The 
United States has a deep relationship with 
Japan, but it is characterized in security matters 
by Japanese passivity reflecting the strain of 
pacifism in Japanese politics. Russia is in the 
turbulent process of working out an entirely 
new posture toward America. As for China, it 
still regards the United States with deep suspi- 
cion os -an adversary if not an enemy. 

The Nonh Korean nuclear case is the anvil 
on which U.S. diplomacy will try to hammer 
out this new Pacific alliance. If it fails, the 
costs could be enormous. If it succeeds, it will 
not only make all countries safer but also will 
set an impressive precedent for cooperation 
among what may w'ell be. in the next century, 
the world’s four most powerful states. 

— THE WASH’MJTOK POST. 


Even in academic fashions the pendulum 
eventually swings back, as illustrated by the 
announcement that Stanford University will 
reinstate the failing grade. Or almost: Stan- 
ford undergraduates still will not be able 10 
fail a course, as in getting an F. but with the 
advent of newly revised regulations in 19^6 

they will once again lace Lhe possibility of 
having their iranscript record that a course 
was “nor passed." Also, if they do badlv in a 
course, they won't, as previously, be able’ to go 
back, lake it again and have al’l record of the 
earlier course (and grade) expunged. The* 
two escape routes, both adopted irTl 970. were 
cutting-edge then and remained so. and they 
probably have a lot to do with the recent 
discovery that the average undergraduate 
grade at Stanford is an A- min us. 

Like so many reforms of the era. this one 
bad lofty aims. Geology professor Gail Ma- 
hood. who chaired the faculty committee 
that recommended the latest change, ex- 
plains that while the initial purpose of the 
post- 1970 rule was to encourage students to 
be creative and take courses outside their 
expertise without risking grade-pcim-jver- 
age ruination, it has not worked out that 


0* 

© 

way. Instead, students seem mostly to go 
back to courses in their major after finishing 
the requirements and take the lower-graded 
ones over again, wasting everybody’s time. 

The change is not what you would call 
draconian: Students who want to retake a 
course can still do so, the only difference 
being that their improved second-time grade 
will now bear a notation thaL it is j retake. 
tThe initial grade will still disappear, even if it 
is the dreaded NP.) As for those rare students 
who were actually using the liberal drop rules 
to go prospecting in. say. other departments' 
introductory science courses, they can still do 
it — by taking the courses on a pass-fail basis. 

Few schools went so far as Stanford away 
from the F. so it is hard to gauge the signifi- 
cance of the shift back. But the wider issue of 
how to engage students in their education — 
or in their actual academic class work — is of 
urgent interest to other universities where the 
notion of giving low grades has sidled toward 
lhe unthinkable. “All we're saying." Ms. Ma- 
hood says, “is that students should take their 
intellectual lives seriously while they're here.” 
Not such 3 bad notion for a uni-crsiiv. 

— THE H iSfJIKCTOS POST. 


TI WASHINGTON — International 

/ 1 inspectors report that North 
Korea :s> removing fuel rods from its 
nuclear reactor at Yongbyon “at a 
very fast pace." This flagrant violation 
of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Trea- 
ty will 1 1 ) provide tie plutonium for a 
North Korean nuclear arsenal che 
stuff being diverted no., could build 
five or six bomb-t. tZ> obliterate all 
evidence of previous illegal doerricn 
of bomb-building plutoruum. and «3t 
allow any sentient observer to sec 
North Korea's real intentions. 

Sentience, howe-er. appears no: to 
be a job requirement in' the never- 
never land of the Clinton foreign pol- 
icy team. Consider this New York 
Times report of Saturday, May 28: 
"A senior Clinton administration of- 
ficial. speaking on Lhe condition of 
anonymity, said he w as baffled by the 
North Korean move. He said there 
was no teehnicai or safety reason for 
withdrawing the rods and noted that 
theiT removal would preclude the 
high-level talks with Washington." 

Well, perhaps this senior adminis- 
tration official might consider the 
possibility that the reason Kim II 
Sung is withdrawing pluioaium-lad- 
en rods is that he wants to build 
nuclear bombs! Only a senior admin- 
istration official could have ignored 
this possibility. Only a senior admin- 
istration official could be baffled that 
Mr. Kim should value possession of 
nuclear weapons above talks with se- 
nior administration officials. 

The level of self-delusion in the 
Clinton Korea policy has reached 
pathological proportions. Cannot 
these senior officials understand that 
Mr. Kim is determined to acquire nu- 
clear weapons? And that he has con- 
tempt for American negotiators who 
have been appeasing him for 15 
months, responding to every provoca- 


Bv Charles Krauthammer 


lion with more concessions? Indeed 
the initial administration response tv 
the latest outrage, unloading the fuel 
rods without inspection, was to an- 
nounce a resumption of high-level 
talks with North Korea. 

vVhat possible incentive does Mr. 
Kim have not lo keep doing whit he 
is doing? North Korea is preparing a 
new test of its medium-range missile, 
the Rodons-I. w hich has the capacity 
to hit Osaka. Japan. Lost luesduv. i"t 
tested u cruise missile designed to 
sink ships offshore 1 guess wnosei. !» 
masses troops on the Demilitarized 
Zone and threatens, if war comes, to 
turn Seoul “into a sea of fire." 

it was already clear Iasi year that 
.American appeasement was" only en- 
couraging North Korean aggressive- 
ness. Yet it took untii May‘31. 1994. 
more than two weeks after North 
Korea bad begun the momentous de- 
fuel ing of its reactor, for the first 
signs of an administration emerging 
from its coma. The Washington Post 
reported that one administration of- 
ficial “angrily called North Korea's 
action ‘provocative, gratuitous ... a 
direct and contemptuous challenge to 
US." He “now believes ‘North Korea 
cannot be trusted.' " 

Now? One can only imagine the 
looking-glass world he and ’his oil- 
leagues have been inhabiting. But per- 
haps we should be grateful for small 
miracles. Now it has dawned on them. 
And now they must act. With great 
reluctance but no choice, Mr. Clmton 
will now have lo press for economic 
sanctions against North Korea. 

North Korea threatens to go to war 
if sanctions are imposed, it is a long- 
standing threat, but Mr. Clinton, 
having let 15 months go by without 
reinforcing vulnerable American 


uv-:pi u: South Korea, has done 
nothing ;c prepare the country psy- 
chological:;-’ or militarily for the pos- 
sibility of WOT. 

What to co? 

e Defense. As Senator John 
McCain, a war hero bui no hawk (he 
has opposed intervention in Beirut, 
Bosmo. Somalia and Haiti*, insisted 
in a Churchiliian denunciation of ad- 
ministration appeasement on Korea, 
the United Stiles should be urgently 
sending fighter squadrons. Apache 
helicopters, bombers, tankers and 
prepositioaed stocks to South Korea, 
instead, in an act of “considerable 


negligence." nothing has been done 
but to send a slow boat to Korea with 
Patriot missiles. 

• Deterrence. The United States is 
not going to start a war. But Kim fi 
Sung might. So the consequences of 
such an act have to be made very 
dear to him: extinction. No armi- 
stice. No 38lb Parallel. No re- 
turn to Panmunjam. 

Presideni Clinton should immedi- 
ately declare that, in any future war 
begun by North Korea. American 
war aims are nothing less than the 
total destruction of the North Kore- 
an regime, the end of the North Kore- 
an state, and war crimes trials for 
surviving aggressors. 


After 15 months of appeasement 
sucb a threat may be looked upon' 
with skepticism in Pyongyang. Bui it 
needs to be issued anyway, for what- 
ever sobering effect it might have on 
Mr. Kim and bis generals: In war- 
time. after alL even weak leaders have 
been known to acquire backbone. 

Appeasement has reached its logi- 
cal and predictable end. With the 
brazen defueling of the Yongbyon 
reactor not even the most naive ad- 
ministration official can pretend that 
U.S. policy has ended in anything but 
humiliatmg faOure. We now enter the 
time that always follows appease- 
ment: the time of acute danger. 

Washington Post Writers Group. ■ 


’t Expect Enthusiasm From Tokyo 

Tk __ . *» n in n 1 1 


r T' OK YO —The crisis on the Ko- 
rean Peninsula requires the 
closest possible cooperation be- 
t-Aeeri Japan and the United States 
at a time when the two nations are 
still recovering from months of eco- 
nomic friction. But the depth of pac- 
ifist feeling in Japan and the weak- 
ness of Prime Minister Tsutomu 
Ha ta s coalition government raise 
serious questions about the effec- 
tiveness of any Japanese response. 

. President Bill Clinton's recent de- 
cisions to paper over trade differ- 
ences wi th Tokyo and to drop human 
rights from the trade negotiation 
agenda with China show that the 
United Slates recognizes Lhe need for 
improved relations wiih key coun- 
tries in Northeast Asia. Washington 
knows that it must form a strong and 
united front to deal with the North 
Korean nuclear issue. 

But not only is Beijing waiy of 
supporting sanctions against Pyong- 






International Herald Tribune 

FJTABUSfiEO .W- 

KATHAR1NE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
C>‘-ClMinnrr. 

RICHARD McCLEAN. P.il'h.\hrr \ 

JOHN V INOl L'R, /iTf.nci'v EJiti v ji HtPmiia 
■ W ALTER WELLS. .V.ns • SAMUEL ART. KATHERINE KNURR-jitf 

CHVRLES MITCHELMORF- Arr.o FJu.m • C \P.L GEWIRTZ. 

• ROBERT J. DONAHUE. •JONATHAN GAGE SitcV.i. mJFuU'W tov.- 

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N EW > GRX — Henry Kissinger. 

the former U.S. secretary of 
stale, has taken exception to a recent 
column of mine. It noted that 20.492 
Amerirans died in Vietnam while he 
and Richard Nixon made poliev on 
the war. in the years 1969-72. 

It quoted H. R_ Halderaar.’s diaries 
as saying that on Dec. 15. 1970. Mr. 
Kissinger objected to an early peace 
initiative because there might be bad 
results before the 1972 election. 

In ajetier to the editor of The New 
York Junes. Mr. Kissinger said the 
column had pounced “on a single en- 
try in 600 pages” of the diaries to show 
that “President Nixon's Vietnam Doli- 
cy was driven by electoraJ politics.’' 

A single en tiy? A few pages later in 
the diaries there is another. 

On Dec. 21, 1970. Mr. Haldeman 
recorded Mr. Kissinger opposing an 
early commitment to withdraw all 
U.S. combat troops “because he 
feels that if wc pull them out by the 
end of *71, trouble can start mount- 
ing in '12 that we won't be able to 
deal with and which we’ll bate to 
answer for at the elections. He pre- 
fers. instead, a commitment to have 
them all out by the end or '72 so that 
we won’t have to deliver finally until 
after the elections and therefore can 
keep our flanks protected.” 

.And another. On Jan. 2ti. 1971, Mr. 
Kissinger discussed plans for “a* ma- 
jor assault on Laos." which he 
thought would devastate North Viet- 
nam’s military capability. (The Laos 
operation turned out to be a costlv 
failure.! “This new action in Laos 
now," Mr. Haldeman wrote, “would 
set us up so we wouldn't have to 


er Was Wrong 


By Anthony Lewis 


worry about problems in "72, and ihat 
of course is the most important.” 

Of course. The overpowering reality 
in the NLxon White House, as so me- 
ticulously recorded by Mr. Haldeman. 
was thai what mattered about any 
proposed policy was its likely political 
effect. (Mr. Kissinger was opposed to 
publication of “The Haldeman Dia- 
ries": it is easy to see why.) 

On Vietnam, the public wanted 
withdrawal of American soldiers 
from a war it increasingly haled. But 
Richard Nixon had repeatedly said 
that he would not be “the first .Ameri- 
can president to lose a war." 

The political solution was 10 with- 
draw gradually, leaving South Viet- 
namese forces to cany on the war. No 
one could seriously expect them to 
withstand for long an army that had 
fought 500.000 Americans to a stand- 
still. Bui the inevitable might be de- 
layed, and a formula agreed with 
North Vietnam 10 let the United 
States claim “peace with honor." 

Mr. Kissinger complained, in his 
letter, about the statement in my col- 
umn that the United States could 
have got out of the war in 1969. 
before those 20.492 American deaths, 
in the same way it finally did in 1973: 
on terms that led before long to a 
North Vietnamese victory. 

Until the end, Mr. Kissinger 
wrote, the North Vietnamese insist- 
ed that a peace agreement remove 
the Nguyen Van Thieu regime in 
South Vietnam. It was only at the 
negotiating, session of Oct. S. 1972. 


that they dropped that point — and 
agreement followed. 

True. But it is a half-truth, leaving 
out the crucial fact. North Vietnam 
dropped the idea of a change of gov- 
ernment in Saigon only when Mr. 
Kissinger acquiesced in its key de- 
mand: that its forces be allowed to 
remain permanently in the South. 

Mr. Thieu saw that concession as 
a death sentence for his government, 
and he strongly opposed the peace 
agreement. He was bitter at Mr. Kis- 
singer for concealing the terms from 
him until after they were agreed, 
indeed deceiving him about the pos- 
sibility of serious new American ne- 
gotiating positions. 

Who knows what might have hap- 
pened if the Nixon administration 
had made that crucial change in U.S. 
policy in 1969. conceding the right of 
Hanoi's forces to stay in the South? 
Hanoi might well have abandoned, os 
unnecessary, the demand for political 
change in Saigon. In any event the 
end result would have been the same 
after 1969 as after 1972: a North 
Vietnamese victory. 

Mr. Nixon said in his memoirs that 
Mr. Kissinger had told him the 1972 
peace agreement “amounted to a com- 
plete capitulation by the enemy: thev 
were accepting a settlement on our 
tenus." Two years later North Viet- 
namese forces marched into Saigon. 

A fair lest of Mr. Kissinger's claim 
would be to put il to the families and 
friends of the 20.492 Americans who 
died in Vietnam during his vears as 
policymaker. Would they thiiik it was 
worth four more years of war? 

77il- AV*r York Times. 


Bv Roger Buckley 


yang, Tokyo, too, may have trouble 
providing the backing expected by- 
Washington. If the crisis escalates 
and die risk of miLiary conflict with 
North Korea becomes acute, Japan 
may hang back from involvement as 
it did during the Gulf War. This 
would intensify U.S. resentment 
against Japan as a weak partner. 

Mr. Hata’s cabinet faces its own 
problems at home. The last thing 
it wants is a full-blown Korean dra- 
ma with the ensuing international 
scrutiny of every Japanese diplo- 
matic move. 

Japanese officials have said that 
Tokyo is willing to join Lhe United 
States and South Korea in applying 
economic reprisals against the North, 
after its refusal to allow full interna- 
tional inspection of its nuclear pro- 
gram. But how far would Japan be 
prepared to go? 

Mr. HaLa would find hims elf torn. 
There would be pressure to cui off 
the estimated $600 million that is 
sent to North Korea each year by 
Korean resident* in Japan: but this 
would cause an outcry from those in 
Japan who, for family or political 
reasons, wish to avoid isolating and 
provoking Pyongyang. Some contin- 
gency planning has been done, but 
Tokyo has yet to face the decision 
to actually halt the flow of this vital 
foreign exchange, let alone to sever 
trade ties. 


Even more sensitive for the Hala 
government is the issue of whether, 
to allow U.S. bases in Japan to.be" 
used in support of an allied naval 
blockade of North Korea, or to go 
further and commit forces to «ich 
an operation. Domestic resistance, 
again, would be strong. Many in. 
Japan fear being dragged into a situ- 
ation that could escalate into full- 
blown conflict. *. 

A bedrock of pacifist public ppm- 
ion in Japan opposes any direct Japa- 
nese involvement in the Korean cri- 
sis. The fact that J apan is within . 
range of North Korean ballistic mis- 
siles, which could one day be armed 
with nuclear warheads, intensifies 
this opposition, particularly in tfih, 
the only country to have experienced 
the atomic bombings of its dries: 

It is one thing for the Japanese 
cabinet and news media to urge 
Pyongyang to submit to nuclear in- 
spection; it is quite another to con- . ' 
template more than token adherence 
to sanctions against the North Kore- 
an government 

Mr. Hala and his advisers are fer- 
vently hoping that the Korean crisis 
pan be defused before Japan faces 
intense pressure from abroad to take 
concrete steps against Pyongyang 

The writer who teaches history, at 
the International Christian University 
in Tokyo, is author of u U.S. -Japan 
Alliance Diplomat y, 1945-1990.“ He 
contributed this comment to the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 


IN OUR P AGES: 100, 75 AM) 50 YEARS AGO 

1894: Hie Embassy Fete 


PARIS — - In spite of the uninviting 
weather Lady Dufferin’s garden-party 
at the British Embassy vesterday after- 
noon {June i 6j tumed'out the social 
success of Lhe present season. U called 
forth the remark from a Frenchman of 
fictile noblesse: “Nous n’avons pas 
vu de pared depuis I860." 

1919: War Seeds Sown 

P ^ R i S - ^ cn M. Paderewski, Lhe 
raum Premier, confronted the Coun- 


pense might be made.” A Herald cor- 
respondent went to the Polish head- 
quarters to Irani what the Poles think 
°f_[he situation. “These concessions 
*“! even satisfy the Germans 
entirely. They will only be taken as a 
agn of weakness. All half-solutions 
sow Lhe seeds of future wars," said a 
member of the Delegation staff. 


IVfW? HEADQUARTERS, 
* xp EDITIONARY 
5 .'“i From °ur New Yo&edt- 


cil of Four on Thursday {June 51 h- ■ rf from Cur New Yo * 

was told politely and plrasamlv bv ill ^ m 311 res P ects 

spokesman some S?S , 3t ^ kadqtSrteB at 

• C: — " ^ Pleasam night [JunTei tredy 

J oar hours after Allied parachutists 


j- ta* ETtaSyrarz 


might begun again if we do not try to 
satisly th«n. Poland has not suffered 
much in the war. Her contribution to 
the victorv was really not vast. We 
can scarcely be expected to go to war 
■g™ for PotaTRrfhci! Crna." 
frontier modifications ai 


your ex- 


air. land and seq invasion in bisfoty. 
(”“ K tr0o P? ha^ pushed into France 
^^ aC ^ Cack ’ and AD** head- 
wnfiiiiiBd reports that there 

and one-bftlf mi-es inland 





fli >« 1 

ii><* 





YET'': j 

.""SvK 4p 





** 


How to Kill 
A Passion 
To Govern 


er 



INTERNATI ONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TU ESDAY, JUNE 7, 1994 

O P I N ION 


Page 7 


By David S. Brod 

been . Pondering ihe 
Sadacs ® 11131 
nJLiwT- ^ nosl weiyone in of. 
ftaal Wishington at the stinging, 

“^oh « federal &£ 

eciHor has brought against Renrc- 

Da* SSsteiSSd^ 

The indictment fr a chamber of 
.octrois of alleged kickbacks, chiea- 

S’J ?“ d j Md cmbczz) artem of 
public funds, totaling, the govern- 
.mat says, at least half-a-nrillion 
dollars. After reading it, you could 
see why Mr. Rosienkowsld's ace 
cnnnnfl] attorney urged him to plea 
bargain. The Ways and Means 
chairman and Ulmofs Democrat 
says he is innocent and will fight 
the case in court. 

Outside Washington and per- 
haps C hi cag o , the reaction, as con- 
veyed by news reports, is that one 
more Capitol Hill sleaze has gotten 
his comeuppance. But here in the 
city where Mr. Rostenkowski 
worked for the last 35 years, the 
reaction is more of tears than of 
anger. Maybe that’s just a reflec- 
tion of the stunted moral character 
many citizens impute to the capital. 

I prefer to think that it is Washing- 
ton's appreciation of the rarity of 
people like Mr. Rostenkowski who 
nave a passion not just to win elec- 
tions but to govern. 

Whatever else Mr. Rostenkowski 
may be, te is not cme of those blow- 
dried, media-wise political manne- 
quins who doesn't know what he 
thinks about an issue until he has 



talked to his pollster. As a public 
official, he loves heavy lifting. 

Since becoming chairman of 
Ways and Means in 1981. Mr. Ros- 
tenkowski has helped three presi- 
dents do their best work on behalf erf 
the country. (It did not matter to 
him that two of the presidents were 
Republicans; he liked them both 
personally and, even if be hadn’t, the 

needs of the country would have 
impelled him to do what he did.) 

He was vital in passing the Tax 
Reform Act of 1986, the landmark 
achievement of Ronald Reagan’s 
second term and maybe the best 
tax biD of modem times. Four 
years later, his speeches saying that 
both tax hikes and spending cuts 
were necessary to curb runaway 
deficits prodded George Bush into 
serious negotiations on a budget 
deal Although President Bosh later 


repudiated the agreement, it was an 
effective act of statesmanship. 

With BQ1 Clinton in the White 
House, Mr. Rostenkowski was his 
heu tenant in both of the big, suc- 
cessful fights of the first year: the 
budget and economic plan and the 
approval of the North American 
Free Trade Agreement. He was 
busting his tail trying to get Mr. 
Clinton’s health care toD out of 
Ways and Means semi-in tacL, when 
the indictment came down and 
forced him, under Democratic 
Caucus rules, to step aside as chair- 
man of the committee. 

None of this excuses or condones 
the actions for which he has been 
indicted — if they occurred. In time, 
a jury will determine his guilt or 
innocence on these charges. What 
his colleagues know and affirm is 
that in the part of bis public life they 


observed, Mr. Rostenkowski lived 
by a code as strict as any you could 
wish. He told you what be was going 
to do; he did not dissemble. He kept 
his word; if he promised something, 
he delivered. He was always up- 
front even when be knew you would 
disagree with him. Phrases like these 
are all over my interviews with 
Ways and Means members, Re- 
publican and Democratic, even af- 
ter they knew the government was 
coming down hard on him. 

No capital ever has a surplus of 
politicians with those qualities. 
Mr. Rostenkowski is a warrior, 
someone who is willing to take on 
lough fights, who knows when to 
compromise and how to win. See- 
ing him brought down — even by 
what are alleged to be his own 
weaknesses — is a sorrow. 

The Washington Post 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


ri Prepare 


Victoiy of Civil Society 

Thank you for John Ausland's 
opinion column, “There Were 
Germans in Normandy, and Some 
Lie There Sufi" (May 18). Fifty 
years have passed since the D-Day 
landings that brought the begin- 
ning of the end of World War IL 
For those of us not yet born when 
the conflict took place, it certainly 
seems to be the time to pm person- 
al hatred aside, rejoice in the vic- 


tory of civil society and show re- 
spect for the many brave soldiers. 

BRIAN CARLSON. 

Madrid. 

Regarding the report “Clinton in 
Normandy : A Tricky Act on the 
World Surge” (May 23) by Am Dev- 
roy and John F. Harris: 

The writers open their article by 
saying that President Bill Clinton 
would face a daunting challenge at 
the 50th anniversary of the Nor- 


mandy invasion, that is, “to honor 
one of history's great military vic- 
tories as a president who avoided 
military service and protested 
against the nation’s last lengthy 
war.” But this raises questions 
(hat are inappropriate and undig- 
nified in the context of the Nor- 
mandy ceremonies. 

Most Americans protested the 
Vietnam War, just as the president 
did. On June 6, the world honored 
the supreme sacrifice by so many 


for a just cause. It was fitting and 
proper for B3J Clinton to be there. 

BERNARD W. POIRIER. 

Paris. 

I have just returned from Flor- 
ence and a visit to the nearby ceme- 
tery for li.S. servicemen, which is in 
beautiful shape, ft is good to know 
that servicemen who died in other 
(heaters of war are not forgotten. 

B. W. FOGG. 

Ware. England. 


Those Days in Rome That Will Never End 


n ECOLLECTIONS of a great 
JV moment in my life, beginning 
in late afternoon, June 3, 1944: 

I have not gone into the streets 
of Rome ail day and am aching to 
do so. ! know better. It won’t be 
safe. The Germans are pulling ouL 
We are glued to the lace curtain, 
through which we watch troop 
carriers, an occasional shiny sta/f 

~~ 1944 ITALY 1994 

car, standard and all, a tight tank 
now and then. 

The heavy ones have already 
moved north, leaving the pave- 
ment of the ViaJe del Panoli a 
mess. The few officers in the staff 
cars look very smart. The soldiers 
in vehicles and those walking on 
the opposite side of the Parioli 
look tired. And fierce. 

8 PM. Daylight is turning to 
nigbL There is an odd air about the 
street Some German soldiers, in 
twos and threes, are walking slowly 
od the other side, carrying arms and 
light equipment. My father whis- 
pers. “They are from special units — 
probably mining buddings.” 

Two boys emerge from the build- 
ing opposite. A German grabs one 
— about my age. 13 — by the scruff 
of his neck, puts a satchel in his 
hands to make him carry it north, 
toward the Tiber. The boy tries to 
object, gels a kick in the rear and 
moves on, stumbling. 

The other boy runs back into the 
building. My mother pulls me away 
from the window. 

10 P.M, No one out there. Noth- 
ing. Are the Germans gone? Are 
the Allies on their way? 

My lucky Jewish family has been 
waiting for this day since we nar- 
rowly escaped (he Usiashis and Na- 
zis in Yugoslavia in June 1941. 
through two yean of internment in 
northern Italy and the endless eight 
months of hiding in the apartment 
erf an Italian friend in Rome. 

We have false Italian identity 
cards, but my parents have not ven- 
tured out much because of their for- 
eign accents. Nor has my sister, be- 
cause she is 18. and some German or 
Italian could get nasty ideas. 

My father sometimes has gone 
out after dark to sell something on 
the black market. My mother has 
gone to the market to buy what 
could be gotten without ration 
cards, like turnips, which I hate. 

I speak Italian very weD and go 
to a Catholic school off the Piazza 


By Ivo John Lederer 


Normandy landings spreads. Still 

,, _ , . _ . exhilarated by the liberation erf 

diSpagna— something my father war." “Ohr “If the Americans arc Rome, I am back out into the fray to 
arranged with the Vatican. Every so caring and rich to put their tanks celebrate this second day! 

mi beds with rubber wheels, not to 


ruin the streets of Rome, well win! 
Now I know. Can I go out now?" 

Peals of laughter- My mother and 
my aster are weeping from happi- 
ness. The avenue is invaded V 
shrieking humanity. I nm off into 
the crowd. Girls kissing soldiers, ev- 
eryone embracing everyone else. 

Some men shout •‘Down with 
Fascism!" as they spit on the pave- 
ment. Several remove their Fascist 
Party lapd pins and throw them 
down. I pick one up, put it in my 
pocket and turn to catch the choco- 
lates, chewing gum and cigarettes 
(for my parents) the GIs are giving 
the crowd. This day never ends. 

Jane 6. Word of D-Day and lie 


Late July. My family and I sail 
for America. A few years later, 1 
become an American citizen and 
add John as my middle name. It 
symbolizes the transition from the 
Old World to the New. 

June 2, 1994. I have just re- 
turned to New York from a busi- 
ness trip to Rome. In my home, 1 
open a small box of childhood 
mementos. It’s still there: the little 
enameled Fascist pin 1 picked up 
on the Parioli 50 years ago. 

The writer is director of the global 

business policy council of A. T. Rear* 
ney, a management consulting firm 
in New York. He contributed this 
comment to The New York Tunes. 


second day or so, my sister and I go 
with buckets to fetch water from a 
pump a block away. The litres 
sometimes are very long. 

2 AM. June 4. An eerie silence 
out there in the dark. When will 
they come? Hurry up! For weeks, 
we have listened for the distant 
sounds of artillery from the ad- 
vancing Anzio front. When wc bear 
nothing, we know the Allies are 
being driven back. By now, every- 
one is a nervous wreck. 

5 AM We doze by the window, 
on our feet. Daylight is beginning 
to crack through the darkness. Out- 
side, nothing. Then, with the speed 
of lightning, an incredible nose. 

An open truck whizzes by, filled 
with wild-looking men wearing 
bandoliers, some without shins, 
several swirling Italian and red 
flags, all shouting: “Roma i Libera! 

Vita Thalia! Abbasso U fasdsmo 
The Partisans. Within seconds, the 
truck is out of tight- 1 look up at 

“y They are tense. TT WAS NEVER, of course, going to be like this. If Hitler, the man of a 

5:30 A.M. Suddenly, the strang- JL thousand certainties, was more certain of one thing than of all the 
est apparition I have ever seen: a others, it was that be was not going to repeat the monstrous mistake of his 

predecessors in 1914 and get himself involved simultaneously in a war on 
two fronts. It was to be one nation at a lime — even, where necessary, one 
bite of one nation at a time. In fact, the German people were led to 
suppose at first that it was to be wholly a bloodless conquest . . . 

All that it cost them was the loss of a little butter and free speech, and 
this was more than compensated by the full employment brought by their 
tremendous armamem program, by the smart click of beds, the dash and 
color of uniforms and ribands, by fascinating new toys, marvelous imi< 
and airplanes, by the growing might of Germany . . . 

The machine was tried; it worked magnificently; it crushed a strong 
nation like Poland in a few weeks ... 

Then Hitler, having made his eastern flank secure, turned toward the 
west in the following spring to win victories even more dramatic over 
Norway, Denmark, Holland, Belgium and France, and to drive the 
British armies into the sea at Dunkerque . . . 

After a vain effort to crush the British from the air, but convinced that 
they had been all but neutralized, he launched his sudden attack on 
Russia, once more with immense initial success . . . 

What must be the thoughts of the German people today when they 
survey the consequences of their adventure? Tbdr armies who marched so 
confidently into Russia have been nearly bled white; they have lost their 


To ihe Brink of Disaster’ 

The following are excerpts from an editorial entitled A War on Two 
Fronts ” that appeared in The New York Times on June 7. 1944: 


jeep, rolling down the Pariah at a 
leisurely pace. A driver; next to 
him a British soldier; behind them, 
an enormous man with a black 
beard, a turban on his head; next to 
him, another soldier, bandaged. 

A zoo, I think to myself. T focus 
on the jeep. A metal box on four 
wheels, as if from an Erector set 
These can't be the famous Allies, 
not in a cheap toy like that. “We 
axe going to lose the war,” I declare. 
My parents smile:. 

Early morning. A deep droning 
rumble, like an approaching drum 
roll, begins to be beard from the 
direction of the Piazza Ungberia, to 
onr left. We crane our necks, all 
four faces flush to the panes. 

The avenue is empty. The ram- 
bling grows louder and louder. Mo- 


ve bides, closed military cars. them; (ram the tides death daily pours upon them and levds their cities. 

“The Americans,” my parents And now, at last, the nightman - that has harmtwt them for yean has 
whisper. Their eyes arc moist. The become a reality. In spite of everything thty have done — in fact, 
four of us embrace, for a long long precisely because of everything they have done — they are once more 
time. I don’t believe what I see. fighting on two fronts. But it is not merely two fronts as in World War 1. 
Heavy tanks on long flatbeds with They are attacked this time not merdy from the east and from the west 
rubber wheels, towed by crudes. Sol- but from the south. In this three-dimensional war they are attacked from 
diets on all over the tanks, broad the sides. What was to have been a inarch to world conquest and to glory 
smiles, a V-sign on every hand. has led them to the brink of a disaster so great they can only look into the 

“Now 1 am sure well win the black abyss and not yet see to the bottom of it. 


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VETS# A Thousand Tales to TeU 

Cammed from Page 1 


*•>{ 

'4'. 


knows the exact, time he came 
ashore on D-Day. It was 1512; he 
said, 3:12 PM. because that was 
when his watch stopped when it 
went into the water. 

“We were jumping overboard,” 
he said. “A man jumps into the 
water never knowing if he’ll ever 
come up. We swam in with a life- 
line, CO of us came in on an LQ 
and 12 of ns made it” 

The other day, Mr. McConas 
and some of Ms friends went to a 
village ceremony and schoolchil- 
dren sang to the old soldiers. 

“They sang “My Buddy.* of all 
thing s,” he said. “How could they 
possibly know?” 

Mr. McConas talked of his admi- 
ration for Major General Clarence 
Huebner, commander of the the 1st 
Infantry Divirioo, and for Briga- 
dier General Theodore Roosevelt 
Jr, assistant commander of the 4th 
Infantry Division, who hit Utah 
Beach with his men and discovered 

they had landed in the wrong place 
because of strong currents. General 
Roosevelt told them, “We’D start 
the war from right here.” 

“There were dead bodies,” Mr. 
McCbnas said, “wounded men, 
wrecked vehicles everywhere, 
you've never seen anything like it, 
the water rushed in. Wood-red. It 
was beyond ccraprehcnsion, and I 
just don't want to talk about h.” 


C b«rtes Wilkinson, a British ri- 
• finnan, came to Normandy at the 
age of 22 from Leeds in Yorkshire, 
a hard-bitten place with a toagh 
fighting tradition stre t chi n g bade 
to tbeWais of the Roses. 

But when he landed on Gold 
Beach, near Arromancbes. an 

Day, Ik recalled, he was as tanfied 

as most other people were. The 
water was already tinged with 

blood, even though he was m one of 

the lead companies. Bodies were 

floating past, face down. 

“But once the doors of the laud- 
ing craft fell open, you just ran and 

prayed,” he said. “The ord ers w ete 
that if you were with your brother 
and he got shot, you left tom and 
just kept going-* 

D 

Raymond Mora, now living in 
retirement in Florida, saw the same 
sort of tMag'OQ'Omafaa, a few miles 
to the west of Gold. 

“We' didn't, expect a cakewalk, 
but hell, it was terrible,” he said.. 
“These were bodies everywhere. 
Even before we landed, we could 
see it was chaos. We had beeam a 
landing craft for more than two 

bounsrand we were all seasick. Lots 
of guys drowned just trying to get 
to the beach.” 

□ 

Don Fechacek, one of the first trf 
the little band of Ranms to reach 
the top of the sheer 1 aHootrock . 
face at Pointe du Hoc m themwt 
famous smaS-uait. action of D- 
Day, did it again on Sunday. He 
scrambled np the dilj m a Ranger 
helmet and old black jeans, none 
the worse for wear «cept for a 
scrape on Ms righttomto 
Now 72, still fanning m ED®- 


worth, Wisconsin, he attributed the 
cut to “ Sensitive skin.” 

“It was no tog dad at . the time," 
he said of the cbmb that others 
have Muled as a xmfituy epic. 
“When you’re 20, nothing bothers 
you. We thought the 225 erf us 
could win the whole war." 

□ 

Even before the Rangers reached 
their goal, a small force of British 
infantrymen landed in ax fragile 
Horsa gilders near a bridge across 
the Caen Canal Almost before the 
German defenders awoke to what 
was afoot, the bridge was in British 
hands, cutting a vital Goman rein- 
forcement route. 

But there, too, said the man who 
led the attack. Major John How- 
ard, now 82, “everybody was very, 
very scared.” 

“When you’re coming in what we 
all called a wooden coffin and you 
don't know where you an: going to 
land, and ids in the middle of the 
iqghi, you expect to be scared,” he 
said. “But we were all Woody glad 
to get here, and all we wanted to do 
was get rid of Hiller.” 

R. W.APPUE Jr. 
and MAUREEN DOWD 



l«nrt fgcrfcr Frakr-Pir* 1 * 

American veterans watching the D-Day anniversary ceremonies Monday at Utah Beach. 


NORMANDY: 50 Years Ago , Allied Soldiers p Saved the World 9 


GwtimttL bon Page 1 

well as survivors of the French Resistance, 
“for the world’s freedom.” 

With nine troop formations, each repre- 
senting a country involved in what the 
French call “Jour J ,” standing in the dark 
sand behind him, Mr. Mitterrand said: “June 
6, 1944, sent a signal. It meant that though 
nothing was yet won, everything was possi- 
ble." 

The president also played host at a lun- 
cheon at the Prefecture in Caen, a city of 
churches all but destroyed by Allied artillery 
and bombs as the ground forces drove south 
and east out of the beachheads. Kings and 
presidents and a grand duke were 


and responsibility, nurtured in Sunday 
schools, town halls and sandlot baseball 


As Mr. Clin too neared the end of his 
speech, the sun burst through, after a day 
uncannily like that of the great battle that 
raged here, bone-chillingly foggy and misty. 
He then walked down to the beach with a 
nimble group of veterans, standing with them 
in a drde for a brief moment of prayer, then 


But Monday belonged to those who were 
here at the start. 

Their mood was biticrswect. As ilte British 
hero the Duke of Wellington once observed, 
victory in war is only marginally better than 
defeat, because even the victors must tony 
their dead. 

In an unoototoori moment when a female 
soldier played “Taps,” and at other emotive 
moments in the various ceremonies, which 
began at dawn and finished just before din- 
uartizue, the old soldiers dabbed at their eyes 
or gulped. Though mostly in their 70s red 
80s, many wore their uniforms, let out for the 
occasion, mdudmg a former sergeant, his 
chest full of medals, who also wore a red, 
Mute and Une Indian war bonnet. Others 
huddled in wmtibreakers, parkas and great- 
coats. 

They hugged each other, took stroJte on the 

backup to Iw.flailand where the^rmans 
dug in their gim positions, and, of course, 
they Urfd war stones. 

One of the great figures of the fighting on 
Omaha Beach, Captain Joseph Dawson, in- 
troduced Mr. Omtoft here. It- was he, having 
nmchided that “there was nothing I could do 
on that beach except die,” who led the shat- 
tered remnants of his co mp any the bluff, 
achieving the first breakout of the day on that 
contested strand. 


ly, apparently to search for a 

A persistent Clinton critic, Senator Alan 
K. Simpson, Republican of Wyoming, who 
was one 61 23 senators here, said afterward: 
“That was a very impressive speech. He said 
the young men saved the world. That was 
erectly right, because Adolf Hiller was ready 
to' win." 

Another familiar Capitol Hill figure. Rep- 
resentative Sim M. Gibbons 61 Florida, a 
Democrat in line to succeed Dan Rosienkow- 
ski as chairman of the House Ways and 
Means Committee, was here as a veteran. A 
captain in the 101st Airborne Division, be 
was one of the first to land behind enemy 
fines in the predawn darkness. He jumped 
with two cans of Scbfitz beer stuffed into his 
gas mask and drank them with a friend, 
tawing the cans as a monument in the middle 
of a road. 



that 
they were 


meant certain death. But 
driven by the voice of free will 


craft, 

4,000 

John Mason Brown, the drama critic, 
watched apprehensively from (he cruiser Au- 
gusta as the grandiose assault began, the 
“mighty endeavor," as Franklin D. Roosevelt 
caDed it the next day, “10 preserve our civili- 
zation and to set free a suffering h umani ty" 
Later, Mr. Brown wrote; “Seen through b'in- 
oculars, the shore is an anthill in turmoil. The 
fateful dent has been made in Hiller’s ar- 
mor." 

Fighting was fierce, but by the end of the 
day it was dear that the Allies would not be 
ditiodged. The Allies had vaulted the Chan- 
nel, something Napoleon and Hiller had only 
dreamed of. To Dwight D. Eisenhower, their 
co mman der, the day’s accomplishments 
showed “what free men will do rather than be 
daves." 


Ai Pointe du Hoc on Monday morning the 
president recalled the feat of Lieutenant Col- 
onel James E. Rudder and his 224 men. who 
captured the cliff top sirongpoint using lad- 
ders and grappling hooks supplied by the 
London Fire Department. One of them, Ken 
Bargmaim of Kensington. Maryland, was 
there with him, along with his son and his 
grandson. 

This was the spot where President Ronald 
Reagan made his arresting speech 10 yean 
ago. If Mr. Clinton did not match him. he did 
well enough to avoid invidious comparisons, 
calling the Rangers in one passage “the tip of 
a spear that the Free World had spent years 
sharpening, a spear they began on this morn- 
ing m 1944 to plunge into the heart of the 
Nazi empire." 

With the wind fluffing his hair and wisps of 
fog blowing pasL with barbed wire still sur- 
rounding the position and German block- 
houses dearly evident, the president quoted 
from the diary that Anne Frank was keeping 
in Amsterdam: “It’s no exaggeration to say 
that all Amsterdam, afl Holland, yes. the 
whole west coast of Europe talks about the 
invasion day and night, debates about iu 
makes bets about it and hopes, t have the 
feeling friends are approaching.” 

Next, at Utah Beach, Mr. Clinton and Mr. 
Mitterrand took part in a joint Frcnch-Amer- 
ican event, more formal than most of the 
others, with the leaders walking down two 
long parallel straight lines, past flags heavily 
laden with battle streamers. 

General Orwin Clark Talbott, who intro- 
duced Mr. Clinton at Utah, had his ship sunk 
under him on D-Day but survived. He re- 
called looking up and seeing what seemed 
like endless lines of airplanes, “a thousand 
planes at once, 1 thought,*' and speculating 
that he could almost walk back to southern 
England on tiirir wings. 

When it was over. Alexander Frank, t>$. of 
New York City and Miami, talked a little 
about his dangerous D-Day work as a mem- 
ber of the 191st Combat Engineers, removing 
mines and beach obstacles. Then, standing 
erect on a dune, scanning the crowd, he said: 
“It was a quite a day. I'm proud 10 have been 
pan of iu 


JAPAN: Baseball Is Striking Out KIM: 

Ominous Shadow 


Continued from Page 1 
million the previous season. So far 
this year attendance has declined 7 
percent But major league officials 
say the situation is more serious 
than those numbers indicate. 

“It’s not just the numbers that 
worry me, but the fact that now the 
cheap tickets sell well and the ex- 
pensive seats are empty," said To- 
shikazu Irani, bead of sales for the 
Nippon Ham Fighters, a team 
owned by a meat-packing company 
and one of the teams Mr. Sboji was 
watching. “Until recently, it was 
the opposite. The expensive tickets 
always sold first.” 

Another ominous sign can be 
seen in the use of sports celebrities 
in Japanese advertising, said Kcaya 
Sasaki, author of a recent study of 
the declining popularity of baseball 
and director of sports marketing at 
Dentsu Inc., Japan’s largest adver- 
tising agency. For years, golfers 
were the most popular, with base- 
ball players a strong second. 

But this year, he said, soccer 
players went from sixth to first. 
Baseball players remain second, 
but most of those who pitch beer 
and the other products are retired 
greats. 

“Thai’s one of our biggest prob- 
lems, the lack of real star players 
now," said Ketji Osawa, the Nip- 
pon manager. “Look at a television 
commercial and the soccer players 
are all young guys. Bui when there 
are baseball players, it's all the old- 
ies. 1 Teel a crisis is developing 
here." 

The only crisis for the soccer 
league is dying to satisfy demand. 
Sony, the giant consumer products 
company, runs a chain of more 
than 200 stores that sefl J-League 
merchandise, from T-shirts to riga- 


rette lighters. They are already do- 
ing hundreds of millions of dollars 
of business a year. 

There is general agreement on 
baseball's problems: the games are 
too long, more than three hours on 
average; the action is too slow, and 
tickets are too expensive, generally 
costing $25 10 $60. 

Soccer games take less than two 
hours, the action is constant, and 
tickets are much cheaper. 

“But people have to remember 
that baseball and soccer are totally 
different sports," said Hiromori 
Kawashima, president of the Cen- 
tral League. “Some people describe 
soccer as being more like a rock 
concert. WeD, baseball is more like 
kabuld. There are lots of intervals 
when you can think about things.” 

Ken Moduzuld, 19, who wore a 
heavy steel chain around his neck 
and a gauzy shirt that was held 
together with rows of safety pins, 
was making a racket with a plastic 
bullhorn and watching the Nip 
Ham Fighters take a beating 1 
the Chiba Lotte Marines. 

He said that he had come only 
because a friend had given him the 
tickets and that he pre fe r red the 
livelier atmosphere at soccer 
games. 

Whether teen-agers like Mr. Mo- 
chizuld arc, in fact, more individ- 
ualistic than their parents is a mat- 
ter of healed debate here. But it is 
dear that younger Japanese at least 
tike the idea of setf-expression that 
soccer symbolizes to them. 

Mr. Sasaki, who did the baseball 
study, said be agreed. “Tbty need 
not just to promote stars in base- 
ball, but to raise up players with 
strong personal diaractenstics,” be 
said. “And there shouldn’t be too 
much meddling by coaches. That 
would be really new." 


CHINA: Airliner Crash Kills 160 


Continued from Page t 

(ration of China, flew 10 the crash 
site Monday afternoon to supervise 
an investigation. 

Initial and unconfirmed reports 
said the plane had exploded in mid- 
air. 

The previous highest death toll 
from an aviation disaster in China 
was recorded on Nov, 24, 1992, 
when the crash of a China Southern 
Airlines Boeing 737 killed 141 pas- 
sengers and crew members at Gui- 
lin, a tourist center on the U River 
in southern Guangxi Province. 

Also on Monday, a Dragonair 
Airbus A320 burst two tires as it 
landed with a disfunctions! wing 
flap at Hong Kong's airport, the 
authorities said. 

Eight passengers were reported 
to have been hurt during the jarring 
touchdown. The plane had first at- 
tempted a landing at 4:35 P.R, 
and then circled the airport for 40 
minutes to bum off excess fuel be- 
fore making its final run. 

Dragonair is 46 percent owned 
by China's stale investment con- 
glomerate: The majority interest is 
held by Cathay Pacific Airlines and 
its parent, Swire Pacific Ltd. of 
Hung Kong. 

Also, a Pima Southern Airlines 
flight from the southern dty of 


Fuzhou to Guangzhou was hi- 
ji&cked stonily after its takeoff at 7 
PM. on Monday. 

The Boeing 737 was reported to 
have landed safely at Taiwan’s 
Taoyuan Airportjust before 8 PM 
Following the usual pattern of hi- 
jackings to Taiwan, the aircraft was 
expected to return to the mainland 
Monday mghL 

Xinhua reported (hat mainland 
officials and Taiwan authorities 
were in contact over the repatria- 
tion of the plane, crew and passen- 
gers. 

The identity of the hijacker was 
not initially revealed. 

China and Taiwan have conduct- 
ed extensive negotiations over how 

to contend with the increasing 
number of hijackings from China 
10 Taiwan, where judicial authori- 
ties have been handing down 10- 
yearjafl terms to hijackers in hopes 
of deterring air piracy. 


2 More Killed in Rddstan 

The Associated Pros 

KARACHI, Pakistan— ! 
shot pd killed two people on ) 
day in violence between Islamic 
sects that has left eight people dead 
to four days. 


Gmtioaed bum Page 1 

to the Bush and Clinton adminis- 
trations to believe that the bomb 
was a bargaining chip, a view sup- 
ported by the Nortlrs grand plans 
for free trade zones, new factories 
and joint ventures with the Japa- 
nese. 

But there has always been a mi- 
nority view, one that seems more 
credible now, that the bomb — or 
the ambiguity over whether one ex- 
ists — is less useful as a chip than as 
an insurance policy against Ger- 
man-style unification. 

"The bomb,” Andrew Made, a 
Korea expert at the Australian Na- 
tional University, wrote recently, 
“offers the North a relatively low- 
cost strategic equalizer against its 
many enemies, and forces (he rest 
erf the worid to lake it seriously.” 

Mr. Mack’s view seemed to be 
echoed in separate studies last year 
by tbs Central Intelligence Agency 
and its South Korean counterpart. 
Both concluded that no amount of 
negotiation would convince the 
North to abandon its nudear pro- 
ject — but also that sanctions 
-would not prove effective. 

The North has survived for so 
long on so little, many experts say, 
that deprivation alone cannot seri- 
ously weaken the government 
“How do you isolate the world's 
most isolated country?” a top ad- 
viser to the South Korean president 
asked a few months ago- "The truth 
is, it can’t be done.” 

One complication to measuring 
the likely impact of economic sanc- 
tions is that North Korea publishes 
virtually no economic statistics. 
But estimates by American and 
South Korean intelligence agen- 
cies, and anecdotal accounts from 
recent viators and defectors, make 
clear that the economy’s slide has 
turned into a plummet. 

The country’s gross domestic 
product has not posted an increase 
since 1989, just as the Cold War 
ended. According to South Korean 
estimates, H declined 5.2 percent in 
1991, 7.6 patent in 1992 and, by 
most accounts, even faster last 
year. More than half of the coun- 
try’s factories are believed to be 
idle. Grain production was cut by 
at least a third, because <rf a partic- 
nlariy poor harvest. 

After years of denying that eco- 
nomic troubles exist, the North 
conceded last December that it 
needed a drastic new approach. 
Kim D Simg publicly abandoned 
his commitment to the heavy in* 
dustry tymbols of a Statons econo- 
my. Instead, he annrtntwwd three 
new industrial priorities: agricul- 
ture, fight industry and foreign 
trade. 

The last category, the one most 
susceptible to sanctions, accounted 
for only $2.4 billion last year, most- 
ly with three countries: China, Ja- 

r and Russia. But the statistics 
not take into account barter 
between North Koreans and ethnic 
Koreans living just across the Chi- 
nese border, and that would be vir- 
tually impossible to step, even un- 
do- strict sanctions. 



The Child Is Father of His Art 


By Suzy Menkes 

tntmuuionai Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — At the end of this week of 
solemn remembrance, a new monu- 
ment will be unveiled. One hundred 
fifty thousand names of France's 
youth are inscribed on a steel totem pole to be 
installed Sunday at the Grande Arche de !a 
Defense, to the west of Paris. 

“France has enough monuments to the dead 
— this one celebrates the living — to show that 
you do not have to die to be a hero.” says Jean- 
Charies de Casteibajac, whose idea it was to 
design the dramatic aluminum structure with 
its roll call of names. Young people were invit- 
ed to contribute their names to their local 
mairies, or town halls, to support Casteibajac’? 
project to give inspiration and a sense of worth 
to a new generation that had grown up with war 
memorials. 

It is a typically heroic flourish from fashion's 
d’Artagnan — a designer who has spent two 
decades jousting with inventive ideas. The mar- 
quis de Casteibajac. to give him his aristocratic 
tide, emblazoned his ancestry in the heraldic 
motifs, the suit-ef-armor vests, the crusader- 
castle patterns and musketeer capes of his latest 
collection. 

His flag-bright colors are hoisted on every- 
thing he designs: canvas coals and runic sweat- 
ers; Louis XVI chairs with their medallion 
backs in brilliant primary colors; lamps like 
soaring arrows from Robin Hood's bow. The 
Paris boutique he opened on Place Saint-Sul- 
pice last month has bright, childish designs in a 
setting that contains a medieval angel and a 
photograph of the designer wearing a suit of 
chain-man armor in homage to Joan of Arc. 

Casteibajac a boarding school boy who 
dreamed of sleeping on the battlefields of Azin- 
cornrt. intended to follow his hero, Hannibal, 
and become a soldier. Even when be made 
clothes for Farah Fawcett in 1980 and created 
in 1974 some of fashion's first jogging suits and 
down coats, he did not seem the typical fashion 
designer. And. indeed, he is not.' His personal 
brief seems to be to bring his imagination to 
dozens of different projects, from the costumes 
for Offenbach's “La Belle Helene” that had its 
premiere in Zurich last month, to the edition or 
Madame Figaro magazine under his direction 
that will be published Saturday. 

“AD these projects have come together: they 
are not really fashion, but through the metier ! 
do many different things.” says Casteibajac. 

There is also a book, published last year, its 
glossy pages showing not just Castelbajac's 
fashions, furniture and his home with its collec- 


tion of contemporary paintings. There are also 
his striking, naive, childlike drawings that give 
a graphic quality to his creations. Crenellated 
castles, crowns, animals, wigwams, his fetish 
angels and childish letters interspersed with 
explanatory pictures are all drawn with the skill 
of an artistic adult but the imagination of a 6 - 
y ear-old. The book is dedicated to his parents 
and to his sons. Guilhem and Louis-Marie, and 
carries this inscription from Cervantes: “Al- 
ways hold the hand of the child you once w ere." 

Casteibajac. 44, started his design career in 
1970 with a blanket coat that has become one of 
his fashion signatures and successes. It was made 
from the dufl beige striped blanket from his 
boarding school years. He openly admits that the 
wellspring of his work is the experience of being 
sent away to school at age 6 and that the ever- 
present blanket coats represent “something of 
Linus in me." 

“It is my childish side," says Casteibajac of his 
irrepressible juvenalia. “I came from an institu- 
tion where color was banned. I remember when 
my father came to see me in his red Jaguar. Color 
for me came to be associated with moments of 
happiness. And color gives happiness. Remem- 
ber that it Is in fascist and Communist countries 
where people are not allowed color.” 

Casteibajac says that he is interested in creat- 
ing “contemporary archaeology." That means 
taking things that are part of his own patrimony 
of Gascony (a region in southwestern France) 
or fashion's heritage, like the classic French 
Weston shoes, and giving them a modern spin, 
with a strong outline and brilliant primary 
color. He is doing the same for Andre Cour- 
ages, the designer whose futuristic space age 
clothes marked the 1960s. The collections he 
has produced for the bouse have successfully 
rejuvenated the original spirit. 

“What interested me was to modernize Cour- 
tages," says Casteibajac. who created a moment 
of fashioD emotion when he took his runway 
bow with an aging Courreges. 


opening credo, the designer announces. “I 
would like to have lived in the Middle Ages." 
and arresting images include the Casteibajac 
dan enjoying an upper-crust picnic and heral- 
dic pennants fluttering from the 1 1 th -century 
castle that the designer is restoring. 

“I have wanted to use Casteibajac for a long 
time — and this seemed to be the moment as we 
are coming out of a period of darkness and 
crisis." says Pauwds. whose magazine has a 
weekly circulation of 800,000. “I like his design 
unrveree. He is someone who has kepL the imagi- 
nation of a child. And he corresponds to Le 
Figaro because he is very French, closely linked 
to the Gascony region, which expresses French 
with panache, and. above alL be is modem." 


C ASTELBAJAC says that his own 
clothes are difficult to date, present- 
ing a problem for museum curators. 
“He is beyond fashion — outside it.” 
says Marie-Claire Pauwels. the editor in chief 
of Madame Figaro, which gave Casteibajac 
carte blanche to create this week's issue. Previ- 
ous guest editors have included the actresses 
Catherine Deneuve and Isabelle Adjani and the 
polymath designer Karl Lagerfeld, but Castei- 
bajac has taken the task so seriously that he has 
even collaborated with advertisers io create ads 
in his own ima g e. That means that Baccarat. 
Barclay's Bank and Hermes have guardian an- 
gels and medieval signs and symbols. In his 


F OR all its apparent childishness. Cas- 
telbajac's worts have become coflect- 
ibles (and not just by famous folk 
addicted to his blanket coats). In 1976 

he started collaborating with artists by asking 
them to design the invitation cards to bis shows. 
Sweeping hand-painted an images on simple 
dresses have become one of his fashion signa- 
tures. And he is dose to artists, especially the 
Italian Ettore Sotisass. who has described Cas- 
teibajac as part of his “rainbow coalition" of 
color-conscious designing. Another dose friend 
is the pop promoter turned performer Malcolm 
McLaren, whom Casteibajac met in London in 
the 1970s as svengali to Vivienne Westwood. 

Unlike other wacky designers of his era. Cas- 
te! bajac has succeeded in l timing his talents into 
a business. Behind him is his mother, whose 
Limoges factory produces his clothes and who 
directs Ko and Co., the company that produces 
his less expensive line. In the 197Ds he designed 
for the Italian company MaxMaia. and his work 
now includes designs for Palladium shoes and 
Swatch watches, with strong links to Japan, and 
a steady’ development into other product areas, 
including menswear ('with playful ties and funky 
sweaters worn even by Prince Charles), he has 
built a business worth 800 million francs ($140 
million), including licenses. 

Prices in his store are not at Lhe deluxe level: 
4,800 francs for a jacket in tea-towel fabric; 250 
francs for a cup with its handle inevitably 
shaped like an angel's wing: 15,000 francs for a 
cream canvas sofa with its cushions in bright 
primary colors. In his use of natural materials 
and his interest in craft, the designer was far 
ahead of the current feel for ecology. 

“Color is my luxury — not gilt or rhine- 
stones," says Casteibajac. “I went to a fashion 
festival earlier this year and everything looked 
so drab and post-nuclear. When people leave 
my collections they cannot help feeling optimis- 
tic. My colors are my flags." 



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Jean -Charles de Castelha- 
jac’s creations: left. Bacca- 
rat ad for Madame Figaro; 
above, heraldic and medi- 
eval motifs in clothes; below 
left, hand-painted Limoges 
plate, and “My Funny Val-'. 
entine ” chair. ’ 




A TALENT FOR GENIUS: 
The Life and Times 
of Oscar Levant 


■ ?>; WHAT-THEY.’RBREADINGYy*^f-:-SS^3a^' 


By Sam Kashner and Haney 
Schoenberger. 528 pages. 525. 
Villard. 


Reviewed by 
Terry Teachout 


A T various limes in his life. Os- 
car Levant was known as a 
concert pianist, a radio quiz-show 
panelist, a successful author and a 
drug addict He was George Gersh- 
win’s best friend and Arnold 
Schoenberg’s best-known Ameri- 
can pupiL His cyanide-tipped wise- 
cracks (“I knew Doris Day before 
she became a virgin") were staple 
items in the gossip columns. Yet 22 
years after his death. Levant is 
mainly remembered as Gene Kel- 


9 John de St Jorre, author of a 
forthcoming history of the Olympia 
Press, is reading "Girls Lean Back 
Everywhere: The Law of Obscenity 
and the Trials of Genius. ” by Edward 
de Grazia. 

“A very good read about the 
landmark novels and legal cases that 
freed American letters from censor- 
ship. It also tells a compelling story 
about the changing mores of the 
20 th century." 

(Lawrence Malkin. IHT) 



Levant's career took an unex- 
pected turn in 1938 when he be- 
came a panelist on the popular ra- 
dio program •‘Information. 
Please!" For the first time, his wise- 
cracks reached a mass audience, 
making him a celebrity. Levant 
capitalized on his fame by writing a 
sharp-tongued memoir called “A 
Smattering of Ignorance*' (the 
chapter on Gershwin is one of the 
shrewdest things ever written about 


Levant immediately became ad- 
dicted, spending the next few years 
shuttling in and out of mental insti- 
tutions. 

By 1955. he was washed-up both 
as a pianist and as a movie star. 
Three years later, Jack Paar booked 
Levant as a guest on the “Tonight" 
show, and he briefly returned id the 
spotlight, becoming the first of 

eniinllmt relphritiec Tall- 


■qr%& 


the composer) and appearing in 
well-paid second-banana film roles 


is probably lucky to be remem- insinuated himself into Gershwin’s 
bered at all circle of friends. 


1/s sidekick io “An American in 
Paris." It’s tempting to say that 


Paris." It’s tempting to say that 
there is no justice in this world, at 
least until yon read “A Talent for 
Genius." a new biography of Le- 
vant by Sam Kashner and Nancy 
Schoenberger, and realize that giv- 
en the spectacular extent of his self- 
destructive behavior. Oscar Levant 


Bora into a Gifford Odcis-type 
Jewish ghetto family (cold father, 
smothering mother) in Pittsburgh 
in 1906. Levant was a child prodigy 
tom between the classics and musi- 
cal comedy. An adolescent encoun- 
ter with Gershwin sealed his fate: 
“1 had never heard such fresh, 
brisk, unstudied, completely free 
and inventive playing.” Levant 
went off to New York to make a 
living as a dance-band pianist and 
songwriter. His off-the-cuff re- 
maps started turning up in Walter 
WincheU’s column, and he soon 


Levant’s friendship with Gersh- 
win had dire consequences for his 
fragile psyche: It left him con- 
vinced dial his own gifts as a song- 
writer were too modest to be taken 
seriously. (Only one of his songs, 
the rueful “Blame It on My 
Youth," is still performed today.) 
Instead of trying to compete with 
Gershwin. Levant became a distin- 
guished interpreter of his piano 
music. At the same time. Levant 
began to study composition with 
Schoenberg, producing a dozen 
long-forgotten concert works. 


well-paid second-banana film roles 
carefully tailored to his sardonic 
persona. 

Ironically. Levant's success on 
radio and in the movies also made 
it possible for him to have a career 
as a serious concert pianist. Pro- 
moters booked him on the assump- 
tion that he would draw huge 
crowds of moviegoers. "Informa- 
tion. Please!” listeners and lovers 
of Gershwin's music. Within a few 
years, he had become the highest- 
paid classical musician in America. 

But Levant was ill-suited to suc- 
cess. The manic-depressive tenden- 
cies that had long been obvious to 
Ms friends soon became fuD-blown. 
and the delicate balance of his life 
broke down completely in 1952 
when he suffered a heart attack. A 
well-meaning doctor treated him 
with DemeroL a synthetic narcotic. 


International 

Classified 

Marketplace 


© Monday 

International Conferences and Seminars 

• Tuesday 
Education Directory 

• Wednesday 

Business Message Center 

• TTtursday 

Internationa! Recruitment 

• Friday 

Real Estate Marketplace, Holidays and Travel 

• Saturday 

Arts and Antiques 


In Bangkok, 
business 
women know 
their place. 


countless celebrities io talk about 
their psycMatric problems before a 
national audience: "Mv usual for- 
mal attire is black tie and strait- 
jacket." Levant subsequently drift- 
ed into obscurity, dying in Los 
Angeles in 1472 after "spending the 
last years of his life in semi-seclu- 
sion. 

It's hard to find any kind of 
moral in the sad and squalid life of 
Levant though a writer like Cyril 
Connolly might have turned it iiuo 
a harrowing cautionary’ tale about 
the dangers of early promise. 
Kashner and Schoenberger are not 
on that level. “A Talent for Ge- 
nius" is repetitious and underedit- 
ed, and neither author is a musi- 
cian, making it difficult for them to 
put Levant's professional career 
into perspective or comment use- 
fully on his compositions. SliU. 
Kashner and Schoenberger have 
ferreted out all the relevant facts 
[t hank s in large part to Levant’s 
long-suffering wife. June, who gave 
them access to his private papers). 

“Someone once asked me where 
1 lived,” Oscar Levant wrote late in 
life, "and ! said. ‘On the periph- 
ery.’ ” _ 

Outside of a half-dozen memora- 
ble one-liners and the shadow’ of a 
vivid personality that survives in 
his films, Levant left little behind: 
one good song, one amusing book, 
and wonderfully idiomatic record- 
ings of Gershwin's piano music. 




r*. 


Thinking 


CttJHidi 


CHESS 


By Robert Byme 


ANANp/BlACK 


T HE Professional Chess Associ- 
ation ooened a new cvcle of 


I ation opened a new cycle of 
active chess grand prix tourna- 
ments. sponsored by the computer 
chip maker, Intel, in Moscow. 

Viswanathan Anand defeated 
the 18-year-old Russian grandmas- 
ter Vladimir Kramnik in the finals 
after the first two regulation games 
and the first tiebreak game, played 
at blitz tempo of five minutes for 
all moves, were drawn and he won 
the second tiebreak game. 

In the decisive game, Kramnik 
plunged forward into a trap that 


■SiapS 

| B n ■ 

rnV 


his knight with 4L..Nf6, there was 
no time for 43 Qb5 in view of 
43~.hg 44 fg Rg 8 . 

Anand’s 44...Rc7 threatened 
45._Rc2, but after 45 RcJ Rd 46 



Rcl bg 47 fg e3, his center pawns 
were overwhelming. On 50 Qf4, he 
let them proceed with their deadly 
work by 50...e2! 51 Bg 8 (51 Qa4 
el/Q 52 Rel Qg3 is annihilating ) 
el/Q. ■ ■ 

After 52 Bd5 Qf2 53 Qf2 Nf2, 
Anand, already enormously ahead 
in material, was about to win even 
mare with his threat to promote Ms 
passed d2 pawn. K ramnik gave up. 


KfMMNIK/WHFtE 


Terry Teachout, arts columnist of 
the Sen- York Daily News, wrotte 
this for The Washington Post. 


cost him a pawn and Anand 
dragged him down to defeat with 
smooth running technique. 

Against a King’s Indian Attack 
that somewhat resembled a Closed 
Sicilian after 8 Nc3, Anand ex- 
changed a bishop for a knight with 

8.. .Bg4 9 h3 Bf3 10 Bf3 to keep a 
strong grip on the d4 square. 

Kramnik's 13 e5 Nd4(13„.Nce5? 
lets White win a piece with 14 T4) 14 
ed ed opened the position but with- 
out any advantage to While. After 
15 Nd5 Nb 6 , he strained to get 
something with 16 Ne7 KJ 18 . but 
here he should certainly have 
bailed out with 17 c3 Re 8 18 Br 5 f 6 
19 cd Re7 20 Bc3. 

Instead, his 17 Bg5? lei Anand 
cut off his knight exits with 

17.. .Qd7! He could not retreat with 


Position after 56 Qf4 


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8, rue de Sevres, 

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18 Nd5? because I8...Nd5 19 Bd5 
Qf5 wins material. And he could 
not play 18 c3 Ne 6 19 Bc6 Qc 7 20 
Qd2 because 20...Nc8! 21 Nc 8 Qc 6 
22 Ne7 Qb7 23 c4 be 24 dc Nd4 is 
crushing. Had he expected, in this 
line, to catch Anand with 20...h6‘> 
21 hg 22 Qg5! fe 23 Qb4 Bh 6 
24 Qh 6 mate? 

On 18 Be3 Ne 6 19 Nc 6 Rbc 8 , 
Kramnik gave up the pawn he bad 
to lose by 20d4 Rc 6 21 d5 Rcc 8 22 
de fe rather than leaving his knight 
out of play with 20 Na5 Bb2 Still 
this had the drawback of Yielding 
Anand a powerful pawn center that 
j?® ^° n bc S ai i advancing with 
24...d5. 

.After Anand had repositioned 


KING’S INDIAN ATTACK 


WUie 
Kramnik 
1 NO 


White 
KnuaaOc 
Bh4 
25 Bf< 
Mbs 
31 Baj 
J2 Ril 
33 Reel 
14 Be7 
35 Bc5 
38 ed 
n Kh2 

38 Qe3 

39 Bd4 

46 gdj 


* 









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ISS^e* 1 ® jJJDEX : 112.05US 

280 Internationally inveSa^'SlS S , tock ,ndex ©■ composed of 
by Bloomberg Busine ss News' 



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Ctea: 129.16 Pnw; 12934 


Zhu Says 
China 
On Track 

No Overheating 
Seen in Economy 

Bloomberg Business News 

HONG KONG — China's econ- 
omy is not overheating, and its an- 
nual growth could be sustained at 
10 percent for as much as 10 years, 


International Herald Tribu ne , Tuesday, June ?. 1994 

For Kantor. a ]\V 


Page 9 


Appwt weighing: 37% 

Close: tu.7IPrevr.HC 


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C International Hunks Tribum 


,. - . w.Mimim »w yuua, 

Mid Deputy Prime Minister Zhu 
Rongji, the country’s top economic 
strategisL 

Mr. Zhu made the comments to 
the Hong Kong business leader 
Paul Cheng, who last week led a 
Hong Kong business delegation to 
Beijing. 

“The main thrust of what he told 
us is that so far people outside 
Cmna have overdramatized the 
overheating of the economy.” 

Analysts, including economists 
a * the World Bank, have warned 
that China’s economy is growing 
too rapidly. In the first quarter, the 
annual growth rate slowed to 12.7 
percent from 13.4 percent for all of 
1993. 

Even with many price caps in 
place, inflation was running at 20 
percent annually at the end of 
ApriL 

Mr. Zhu blamed pan of the in- 
flationary pressure oa huge con- 
sirwtion projects, with 2.0H) miles , 
(3,200 kilometers) of new roads 
and railways, 15 million new tele- ■ 
phone lines and 15 million kilo- j 
watts of power-generation capacity i 
finished last year. , 

“No country in history has really 
pumped in so mneb capital in one 1 
year,” Mr. Zhu said. J 

Mr. Zhu said the state had to fa 
grant higher prices to fanners to t 
halt their migration to the cities. f. 

Some economic statistics given £ 
by Mr. Zhu: a 

• China’s foreign reserves stand u 

at S30 billion, up from $212 billion a 
at the sian of the year. A 

•The rise in living standards is 

outpacing prices by 10 percent as 

• New money issues are growing ar 
at20 percent a year, compared with b< 

inn Wkfwmf €k immi- 


By AJan Friedman — - ■*■ 

fnttnuuiuta / NmJj Tnhune " the impression” that Mr. Kantor 

■StSlFS 0ECD on Growth Gloomy on Jobs Sss»S 55 

a comprehensive U.S.- Japanese /t«,m . _ t isiration of hiroe Minister Tsu- 

tradc accord before the stan of the PARIS —The world’s .rich nanVwc n-j “ , P^ccnt in 1994 and 2.9 percent in 1995 enm- lomu Hata. This appeared to be a 

SinSSr ^ tlK - Gr0UP K.° f ***»»* >«r and next than preSv fo? 11 ?mml 17 P^ 1 “ previous rcft ™ e . » Washington’s aware- 

seven industrialized nations in Na- cast bui the\- will remain dossed bv hieh fo ™“ st - ness of the fragility of Mr. Hata’s 

pl “ "i? 0 * mem in the'abscna^w^id« to «tTH“ pwar ? r ? ls,Qn rdlects sironger-than-expect- governin 8 ooalirioa. 

^ U S - ■ tradc J r blesaiess - of the Oreanizadon f« Econt^dJ “P 071 ' 1 ^ 5wh in Eu^ Mr. Kantor said he expected to 

C«J«rauor, and DevrlopmeSt said Monday in *P*n. meet this month with Koji Ka- 

6 ^ 0V f ra ? ^ 0ff,ciaIs - speaking in advance of a twodav Pa^Sl ^ Uie 25 nnmsIcrs m «^ng in *e Japanese foreign minis- 

SthSSi?w-K”“ S U-ade de f ial OECD “uusterial meeting sianing Tnesda? sud^he w ™ ch ,er J who *** *»« expected to at- 

SanS importantlhari piganttauon had raised its growth 1 forecasi'wnkS “5L ^nprS P^'eraGEp member countries, tend the OECD meeting in Paris 

^ f ? r t-'nned States and Japan. fro^USL dUC ? on Tuesda y the Ja week but who instead stayed in 

swtors such as cars, teiecommum- made six months aao. " '° se utmufis of a two-year study into unemployment and Tokyo Tor what were desrrihnl ac 


: — - uuj. KKu.'mniiiiu- 

cal ®w* wd medical technology. 

He indicated, however, that pro- 
g'ess was still possible before the 
Naples meeting in talks concerning 

■ T 


auc aw monms ago. 

The new forecasts show growth for OECD members 


Th» npr-rC u memuer countries, 

rne OECD was due to release on Tuesday the 
findings of a two-year study into unemployment and 
to argue for easing as a means of tackling the jobs 


rntcuuK ui rans 

uus week but who instead stayed in 
Tokyo Tor what were described as 
domestic political reasons. 


lor said it was neeessaiy “to strike a 


ment of medical technology. Aside 
from these sectors the sinalled 
framework talks also concern intel- 
lectual property rights, insurance, 
and automobiles and auto pans. 

In remarks that seemed decided- 


in a critical sector into another 
market, in this case Japan's.” 

Mr. Kantor. in Pans to atiend 
the annual meeting of the 25-na- 

lirtn nnmmhu r »- 


ana auiomohiies and auto parts. ohieriiT*. *• Cf. v . - l r“ u ‘T n,ea vocucrouslv iha; these com- 

In remarks that seemed derided- It ^ Lie meT ? ls T 3131 the 011,1011 a dminis- 

jy l^strident than some positions pans of the defioTthat were “SiS ! ra,10 3 5-* 11 ? soflened iu position 

he had taken in .he pasl. Mr. Kan- SSt * ““ ^ 

Fed Expected to Take a Break 

By Keith Bradshpr cards and smail-business loans man and m>vi i.n.._.:.i ■ _ . 

have climbed. 


He acknowledged, however, that 
there had been changes in the “ap- 
proach, style, nuance and rhetoric" 
of the United States since the two 
countries agreed last month to re- 
start their framework diwi^ ri o ns. 
He cited recent progress in stafT- 
level negotiations, and said, “Our 
officials are hopeful" 

A Japanese official in Paris said 
his government had been “getting 


“The idea that you're going to 

solve all problems before Naples is 

unrealistic," Mr. Kantor said. “Ob- 
l. however, that viously you want to make progress, 
iges in the “ap- which you can make incrementally 
e and rhetoric" or not What we are trying to do is 
s since the two not put a hypothetical or unrealis- 
t month to re- tic time limit on these talks.” 
^discussions. Mr. Kantor sought to distinguish 

IK-SS?" ^ reluctance to set a deadlincLn 
nd said, “Our negotiations with Japan from the 

il in Paris said dea ^ e ® talks that pro- 


100 percent a year ago. 

Mr. Cheng said he told Chinese 
leaders they stiD needed to be “vigi- 
lant and maintain dialogue” be- 
cause issues such as human rights 
and Tibet “would not go away. 


f By Keith Bradsher 

Afetr York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Top offi- 
cials at tbe U.S. central bank have 
• concluded that growth in the 
; American economy has slackened 
slightly and inflation is under con- 
trol, making further interest rate 
increases much less likelv in the 
coming weeks. 

Three of the Federal Reserve 
Board s five governors said thev 
did not believe that unemployment 
had dropped enough to ingger fur- 
ther action, given contradictory in- 
formation on hiring that the Labor 
Department released on Friday 
along with an announcement that 
unemployment had fallen to 6 per- 
cent in May from 6.4 percent in 
ApnL 

This news was viewed Monday 
as encouraging to financial markets 
around the world and pushed U.S 
bonds and stocks higher. (Page 10) 
The Fed already has raised 
short-term interest rates by a total 
of 1.25 percentage points in four 
stages in the last four months. As a 
result, the interest rates that Ameri- i 
cans pay on their mortgages, credit i 


£!? S ,|?mL Sma,1 ' bus,ness ,oans 10311 Md "w® 1 influential voice on 
nave climbed. monetary policy, derides that iht 

The Fed has long regarded steep m nn employment is worrisome, 
drops in unemployment as one of A hallmark of Mr. Greensoan's 
the two or three clearest signals of len ^e at the central bank, howev- 

an overheating economy. The three cr. has been his reluctance to re- 
“ Jd th ? V re & arded ‘he «° any single economic indi- 


r il - i_ - me 

tall in the unemployment rate in 
the context of other recent an- 
nouncements such as a slight fall in 
amsumer spendine and~ slowi n « 
sales of new cars. ’ 

We actually had a mixed week 
in terms of statistics — I don't 
think anyone is alarmed.” said 
Lawrence B. Lindsev. one of the 
governors. 

The overall pattern of recent eco- 
nomic indicators clearly points to a 
slowing of economic growth and 
reduced risk of inflation, said Ed- 
ward W. Kelley Jr., another gover- 
nor. “Recent data do seem to imply 
that is what is going on now — ij 
does not surprise me and does not 
disturb me.” he said. 

Such sentiments make it much 
jess likely that the Fed will raise 
interest rates. The Fed could raise 
rates if Alan Greenspan, its chair- 



t &v-f 

f r . 


; / ,.'4f 

■■■'■ A f :4j 


Alteorf / Commentary 


■ J VMIIIUUUL UHlt - 

cator, specially 5 it is inconsistent 
with other indicators. 

■ Less Leeway in Germany 

A Bundesbank council member. 
Dieter Hiss, said the German cen- 
tral bank has room to lower moneys 
market interest rates, although ris- 
ing U.S. rales narrow iis leeway 
a^orcting io press dispatches from 

Mr. Hiss said an adjusunent of 
the securities-rqjurchase rate; now 
at 5. 15 percent, is possible because 
the discount rate, which sets the 
floor under German money market 
rates, is 4.5 percent. 

Meanwhile, the Bundesbank 
president, Hans Tietmever. said in 
a newspaper interview that the cen- 
tral bank would stay on its stability 
course, with the horizon cleared af- 
ter German key interest rate cuts in 
May. (Bloomberg, Knight-Ridder ) 


See KANTOR, Page 10 


Sara Lee to Revamp, 
Cut Work Force 6% 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

V* Corp - Monday that it planned to lay 
■,^ nployecs “ from 8.000 to 9,000 worldwide — 

* Ia “ * S732 millicm pretax chaige. 

a time when Sara Lee is strong and on course for another 
^ our focus on our basic busing 
S H 1 “ dudin 8 hiding our worldwide brands and strengthen- 
S. S dXf«Sr neiS * 53,11 John Sara Lee chSi 

Yo^^ I ^ 75C “ tSaShai ' 10doSea ‘ S23 - SOontheNcw 

RMtrttcturin 8 wodd involve all four lines of business, with the 
majority of the chaige related to worldwide segments of the peraon- 
ai-producis operations. This division accounted for $6.1 bi^oaOT 
about 4- percent, of Sara Lee’s $14.6 billion in sales in fiscal 1993 

138,000 31111 markets products under brand 
names including Playtex, Sara Lee, Dim, Kiwi and Douwe Egberts. 

STbsS'^ F “ d - *" ^ f- « 

■ 10 remain a growth company, competing effectively 

S333V 5J£S!* ^ » d k & „J& 

stes, "SrSa; 


Canada Is Angry — audit Matters 

W ASraNGTON — If there were Not only is the United States failing to proved by Congress, in much t 
acootest for the world's least |oUowtim>ughi^cornimiinraistoffeetrade, It mattereb^u« both Caj 
bdtigrat hgcoonfiy, Canada ^“fdm a recrat speech in Washington, it is United States see NAFTA M 
woidd probably win it. But even ywMmg uj an “mstmet to anoeasr dnnw-Hin «r«. .« i; n k j-UlL-S „ 

uanada has finally lost patience with Wash- 
ington's trade policies. 

And C a n ad a has in turn annoyed Wash- 


V: SS* 

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Canton adminis tration’s commitment to free 
trade. 

Ottawa’s charge is that, by aiding and 
.abetting the “trade harassment" of CsmaAa 
by U^. business, Washington is setting a 
dangerous example tor the wider world trad- 
ing system. Ottawa is right. 

Canada, of course, is nor the only country 
to have been angered by the pugnacious trade 
postures struck by President Bill Clinton and 
his overzeaJous trade representative, Mickey 
Kantor. 

But Canada is meant to be cm the side of 
the United Stales. The largest angle trading 
partner of the United States, after all, is 
Canada. The United States sells more to 
Ontario than it does to Japan. 

• Tbe two countries have been progressively 
merging their economies, first in the U.S.- 
C anadi an free trade area and now under 
NAFTA — the North American Free Trade 
Agreement that also includes Mexico. 

Even so, some nasty disputes have persist- 
ed, largely because of the aggressive use of 
U.S. laws on subsidies and anti-dumping 
against competitive Canadian exports such as 
lumber, steel and main. 

Roy MacLaren, Canada’s minister for in- 
ternational trade, has decided that the time 
has come to pin the blame for what he calls 
“narrow internecine protectionism” squarely 
on the Umted States. ■ 


: Not only is the United States failing to 

t fouow through its commitments to free trade, 
i Bfcsjndin a recent speech in Washington, it is 

1 iuvj: ® 10 311 M ? n8 “ ict 10 ®ppease domestic 
todies or to seize a short-term advantage.” 

That instinct is particularly strong when 
Democrats are in charge both in the White 
House and on Capitol H0L Both Mr. Kantor 
and Ronald H. Brown’s Commerce Depart- 
ment are generally far too susceptible to pro- 
tectionist pressure from Congress. 

But Canada also has more specific com- 

B hunts. In his scramble to buy votes to pass 
lAFTA, for instance, Mr. Chmon pledged 
support for senators from a small group of 

The United States sells 
more to Ontario than it 
does to Japan. 

Northern UJS. states seeking protection 
against Canadian wheal imports. 

Washington has dragged its feet on Cana- 
dian demands for new rules that would put an 

md to the constant abuse of U.S. trade laws 
by American business interests — often with 
the administration's eager complicity. 

As Mr. MacLaren puts it, themcreasinely 
arbitrary application of US. trade laws has 
allowed vested interests to use the courts to | 
compete, instead of the free market," i 
Why should that matter to anyone outside 
Canada? It matters because the same U.S 
protectionist forces wffl ay to drcmnvent < 
some oi the trade-fiboalizing effects of tbe 
Uruguay Round, which must still be ap- | 


• proved by Congress, in much the same wav. 
> li , f because both Canada and the 
i Umted Slates see NAFTA, the only free- 
trade area to link developed and developing 
economies, as a model for ihe rest of ihe 
world. 

In the words of Jeffrey E Garten, U.S. 

of commerce for international 
trade. North America has become an ad- 
vanced microcosm of where the world econo- 
my is moving in the years ahead.” 

Washington, for instance, would like fu- 
ture wwld trade agreements io follow the 
tana of rules on tbe environment and labor 
standards that Mr. Clinton had appended io 
NAr 1A 

But other countries will quite rightly refuse 
to accept such rules if they believe that Wash- 
ington. m league with U.S. business, in lends 
to use them for protectionist purposes. The 
U.S. record in NAFTA will clearly be an 
important due to its intentions. 

. St £ te L WMls lo ex P and 

«^ A *5 Wesleni Henusphere. 

starting with Chile. Canada says anyone who 
accepts the rules should be able to join — 
mchidmg the likes of Australia, New Zea- 
land, Singapore and South Korea. Which have 
all shown interest. 

But it would be a big mistake to extend an 
arrangement under which the United Stales 
uses its muscle to lake what it wan is for itself 

and thy tries to deny ad vantages to its 
partners when they are inconvenient for l' S 
business. 

If NAFTA is to send a message io the rest 
35 Washington and Ottawa 
would like, it s important to get the message 
right fiisL In a free-trade area, trade should 
be free. 


ittymwk 






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TH-E FINE ART of SWISS BANKING 


A Mouther of 5FA 





Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 1994 


iMSKET DIARY 


tfo Am'iOinl Pr*» 




Saw Jones Averages 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Kmart Is Considerate 


Sue Chip Rally 


Daily dosings of the 

Dow Jones industrial average 

m 


| 37W « J'o802 37«J3 —170 I 
TrerR WIJ* 1030.17 101150 101577 _? J* ' 
M:il 137.6S ISIS* 1J7JJ6 10753 >040 


Metals 


Claw Pnriows 

■Id Ask Bid AsX 

ALUMINUM IHIflk Gra09) 

M tan per metric ten 

Soot 133*00 133500 I32S50 1.130.53 

Forward 136100 136400 U5850 135S0Q 

copper cathodes (hi* erode) 

Dollars per metric too 

Spat 223*00 223300 223*00 223L00 

Forward 23*200 22*200 234100 22*800 

LEAD 

Douon per metric tan 
Scot *9?JC ns SOM 50500 

Forward 517.00 51100 52LO0 52200 

NICKEL 

Dollars per metric ton 
Scot 417000 61S0JK 417100 610100 

Forward 636500 627000 06100 627000 

Till „ , 

Dolton per mefrlc ten 

Spat 547100 HtSJX B4O0O 554100 

Forward 555000 556000 561500 562000 , 

ZINC (5f«cM Mtot 6rade) 

Dollars Per metric ten 

Soot W9J0 05050 OSSjOO 95600 

Forward 9750D 776JB 98000 90100 


Comp !llsJ9 131750 1310.11 13ICL87 -O.W 


Compiled by Ow Staff From Dupattha 

NEW YORK — A rally by blue- 
chip shares was dipped late in the 
Monday trading session by profil- 
takcTS, but small-capitalization 
shares were able to hold onto their 
gains. 

The market was cheered by a 
rally on the bond market as interest 


U.S. Stocks 


rates fell along with fears about 
inflation. 

Tbe Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age dosed 3.70 points lower at 
3,768.52, while the Nasdaq Com- 
bined Composite Index rose 1.05 
points to 743.43. The Dow Jones 
index had been up more than 21 
points early in the day. 

"Investors have finally settled on 
a scenario whereby interest rales 
are about where they should be," 
said Bill Aliya, managing director 
at Jefferies & Co. 

Michael Metz, investment strate- 
gist at Oppenbeimer & Co„ said 
Friday's mixed Labor Department 
report on unemployment helped 
market participants to the opinion 
that the economy is not growing as 
swiftly as in the first quarter. 

“It seems we are still growing but 
at a slower pace, and that is an ideal 
environment for stocks, with no 


inflationary pressures and no in- 
centive for the Fed to tighten cred- 
it," Mr. Metz said. 

The rally in the bond markets 
lifted the price of the benchmark 
30-year Treasury bond by 17/32 to 
88 8/32. The yield fdl to 7.22 per- 
cent from 727 percent on Friday. 

Advancing issues outnumbered 
declines by about 1 1 to 7 on the 
New York Stock Exchange, while 
volume on the floor of the Big 
Board was tallied at 259,080,000 
shares, down from 270,420,000 Fri- 
day. 


V 


Standard & Poor's Indexes 


w 


Indira trio la 
Trcn ip. 
Utilities 
Finance 
SPOT 
SP IDO 


High LOw CIok Cbtae i 
537.15 533.09 53359 —2 M i 
3WJ7 391 JO J92.10 -MB 
15740 15L48 154.92 4-144 
4644 464) 4045 +003 
441.87 45845 45048 - U5 
42001 424.06 42409-2.19 


MYSE Indexes 


3B»- ■ 


High LOW Last dig. 


Compcaiie 

rnau'Jrinls 

Tiwsp 

Ulilir/ 

finance 


255.40 754.11 254.17 —OH 
313.4? 31 149 311.51 — UB7 
349.0 347.69 247.99 -041 
711.14 30847 71049 -145 
230. IS 719 JO 71477 -047 


umj low loM some aitoe 

is ss ss ®2 §3 =K[ 
I ■B’S’KHEg 

5s 2y NT NT. I5&S0 —OSD 

fSr NX NX IIX 1 W-W 

Est. volume: 18550 , Open kit WB 

ft Its KB !ts 

22 Ii2 1UI KJ7 Uff — 

s* as jtfi is 

g gg 1 SS ifflzK 

££ its Ssa too* 16J» — 0- 

lt ?0 IMS toB 3 lfcOO —all 
gjL vaftjme: 38291 - Opon tot. l* 5 J 8 S 


stores while analyzing officer. Joseph Aa- 

Kmart’s cteunnan, financial abihty to complete 

i^i ri 'iA the conmanv s connmtment ano * u., ,h- defeat over 


Financial 


Stock Indexes 

Htofe LOW One OWt 


D J F ‘ M AM J 
1993 1594 


NASDAQ Indexes 


High Low Lost Ow. 


Syntex led the NYSE mosi-ac- 
dve list, falling 'A to 23. The U.S. 
Federal Trade Commission has ap- 


f iarently requested additional in- 
ormalion involving Roche’s $24 a 


formation involving Roche’s $24 a 
share lender offer for Syntex. 

Microsoft, meanwhile, led the 
Nasdaq most-active list, up 1^ to 
54Vi 

PepsiCo dropped 1 Vs to 34% af- 
ter the shares were cut to “moder- 
ate outperformer” from “buy" at 
Goldman Sachs. 

CompUSA Ido. the largest U.S. 
computer retailer, fed as much as 
2% to 9h after it said it expected to 
report lower-lh an -expected sales 
and a possible loss for its fourth 
quarter, ending June 25. 

(AP. Bloomberg ) 


NYSE Bflos3 Actives 


Ccrr.pavlrt 

Industrials 

Bonus 

Insurance 

Finance 

Trunm. 


TA1.T3 74244 744.13 *175 
756. 0.’ 754J3 75185 -3.14 
7-U2 741.77 745.09 -191 
»7 J3 901.49 906.67 - 4.03 
947.45 94XBS 94745 -4.06 
711.51 707 JO 7OT.ID —064 


Vot 

High 

Low 

Lori 

013- 

-air: 

31 Vs 

3o:« 

31 



35*7 

J4F. 

347. 

—1 

<032.’ 

Sl'a 

SO*. 

51 

- 1 'T 



5% 

SV„ 


31763 63 Vi 

i?*'. 

63'-. 

-l 

31 128 

745. 

7i". 

?3>'. 

—V. 

23124 

6 

r. 

6 

-Vu 


75'* 

22 

23': 




*k\'« 


-1»* 



109’. 

1 luV* 

—2' • 



22 : -i 

22 .. 

'.0 


57'v 

51 

SI 

—1 


48 'V 

46'. 

4fr*. 

— IF. 

2)481 

79 H 

28' i 

7*'.j 

** 


AMEX Stock Index 


High LOW Last ChO. 
647.90 441 .04 44239 -0J5 


Daw Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bonds 
idumiinm 
10 Indinirfab 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


NYSE Diary 


Dollar Sales in Japan 
Put a Cap on Its Rally 



Voi 

High 

Low 

Lnl 

.vucstt s 

325008 


51 *i 

SJ'-. 

(DBCtti s 

57977 

ava 

7',* 

B 

TetCmA 

38916 

23*9 

715. 

71*, 

US Mtri s 

33617 

J 



inrH 

76334 

63 

AIV. 

61".'.. 

DSC i 

26138 

?I*H 

197, 

I*f . 

rtnb ffl-. & 

25044 

40% 

38 

38'« 

SrxjoQus 

74® 7 

28*7 

J/'.J 

28 V. 

Dracie s 

22109 




Dscos 

21730 

25' . 

24 1 -.- 

Af 

SYyVSs 

70331 

»l‘j 

V— 


rACTS 

2079? 

24’ > 

24 

24'v 

incests 

18936 

14'. 

13’y 

13V, 

EricTADO 

18641 

r.« 

r. 

1 '■ 

3Com 

>8617 

45s . 

43 

43'. 


Advonccd 

Declined 
UricTion?od 
Tola! ium-6 
New Hiqhi 
New Laws 


133 1350 

664 79S 
624 679 
7616 7834 


HOD Low daw dent 
J-MONTH STERLING (LIFFE) 
tsoa4M -era of m pet | 

jpg 94J5 94.73 94J5 +003 

Sop 9446 »4J9 9442 — OOS, 

Dee TUB 73J0 93J* —007, 

MOT 93J3 93.1S 9124 -00*1 

Jim 9177 9257 9266 -004 

scp 9220 9243 92.13 lincti. 

Pec 9142 91-65 9IJ5 —006 

MOT »IJ0 91J5 9144 -W 

Jao 9148 91.17 9U4 —005 

Sop 91XM 90»2 90J7 —009 

D*C 9081 9071 9078 - 007 

Mar *L64 9034 9036 -- 0.10 

EsJ. volwnc: 66,140 open Irrt.; 529429. 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS (UFFB) 

SI mHDoo - pt» otlOO pet 
jim 9541 9540 9541 +007 

see ton ?«J2 MA7 +017 

MC 909 H2S M78 +018 

Mar to07 9434 9438 + 019 

Jin N.T. N.T. 9330 + 0.18 

Sep N.T. N.T. 9X57 +017 

Esl. volwmo: >39. Oeon lnta 10428- 
3-MONTH EUROMARKS (LIFFE) 

DM1 aiiuioa-eraof 180 Pd 
Jm 9*39 9436 9438 +032 

Sop 9530 94JT3 94.93 — 033 

Dec 9486 94J7 94J7 —004 

Mar 9466 9436 9438 —033 

Jan 9431 9435 9436 +03 1 

Sep 9432 93.96 9337 + 032 

DOC 9181 9175 9170 9002 

Mar 9136 93.60 9161 +031 

Jud 9366 9143 9363 + 031 

5ep 9130 9127 9127 -031 

Dec 9113 9110 9339 —032 

Mar 9235 9231 9251 Unch. 

Est. volume: 102366. Open in*.: na. 


HM LOW Owe Cbame 
FTSB IM lUFFEj 

3UU 29900 29973 

B*t volume: 20195. Open Infc; 40912. 

CAC 40 (MAT IP) 

BIUD -«J 

ST 202100 2D 15-00 20)230 —730 

AM 203*3) s*S 23& ”1-25 

sS 205000 jotai vnssa -\x 

Sc N.T. N-T. 205030 — 730 

310230 210200 208630 —730 

EM. volume: 24.187. Open toil.: 79344. 
Sources: Motif. Associated Press. 
Louden Inti Financial Futures ExCtionoe, 
inti Petroleum Exchange. 




Compeer Per *■>* Pa » »■«: 

IRREGULAR 

Banco de San rander b OB 6-J4 6E 

Pioneer Interth^w . - -2 $^2 

TrJNet Con* RltV - -59 6-30 7-15 

a- cSi prwaeds In lieu a# rtoMo affertns pot 
ADR. 

INCREASED 

PMC Capital 0 23 +*0 7-11 


me sirwuiw “r~“V . 

shareholder approval Fi nday. reductions in ayamy 

“Kmart’s balance sheet is s^gdoe ^ n^rreu^ sbeei ». 

isvestmoil and £ said, “to U>e wets 

CST* altojadvesavaOabla » 

the value of our specialty retafl businesses. 

Sprint and EDS Cancel Mer^rT^s 

DALLAS (B« - 

receive ha me combmed concern. n^ariiie a definitive agreemani 

umfer its par cn u Gtnml Molors Corp., and 

is based uTSsas G.J. Missouri, aad is fe 

^JdlSWssomoetdq.boueco^y. 

Mueller Buys Back Quantum Stake 

WICHITA, Kansas {Bloomberg) - Mueller Indus™* Inc. said Mop. 
dayittod^bougbt 924.875 shares, or 9.64 percent of its common stock, 

co^mlMwwnum and plastic products manufactann s compan y. 
Sr said the purchase was funded through exjstmg cash balances. 


AMEX Diary 


Bioombag Businas News 

NEW YORK — The dollar was 


little changed a g ainst the yen and 
other major currencies Monday 


other major currencies Monday 
amid signs that Japanese exporters 
are selling the U.S. currency for yen 
whenever it rallies. 

Japanese exporters earn revenue 
in dollars and other currencies that 
they must sell for yen to bring their 
profits back to Japan. Their huge 


Foreign Exchange 


trade surplus with the United 
States — it reached S59 billion in 
1993 — means Japan’s manufac- 
turers have a massive stockpile of 
dollars to unload each year. 

“Exporters are putting a cap on 
the dollar's rally.” said Joe Franco- 
mano, a trader at Dai-Ichi Kangyo 
Bank in New York. “A lot of them 
like selling at these levds.” 

On Friday, the dollar jumped to 
a two-month high of 10535 yen. 
buoyed by concern about North 
Korea's nuclear weapons program 
and a rally in U.S. bonds. On Mon- 
day. some Japanese exporters took 
advantage of the rally to sell, trad- 
ers said. 

The dollar dosed at 105-275 yen, 
off slightly from 105.385 yen’ on 
Friday. It gained to 1.6705 Deut- 


sche marks from 1 .6702 DM. where 
it dosed Friday. 

“Many Japanese corporations 
do not expect the dollar to rise 
above 107 yen,” said Koichi Taken- 
aka, assistan t vice president at In- 
dustrial Bank of Japan, and many 
are poised to sell dollars at 105.50 
yen or 106 yen. 

A bond rally helped the dollar 
gain last week by convincing many 
currency traders that international 
investors are again buying U.S. fi- 
nancial assets after bailing out ear- 
ly this year. 

Although good for bonds, steady 
U.S. interest rates might bun the 
dollar because German short-term 
interest rates are still as much as 
one percentage point higher than 
U.S. rates, making mark-denomi- 
nated deposits more attractive, 
traders said. 

“If the Fed is on bold, the dollar 
loses one leg of support,” said Marc 
Chandler, director of research at 
Ezra Zask Associates, a Norfolk. 
Connecticut, hedge fund with S180 
million under manag ement. 

Elsewhere, the British pound 
closed at $1.5078, up from $1.5055 
Friday. The dollar fell to 5.6975 
French francs from 5.7020. It fell to 
1.4 173 Swiss francs from 1.4205 
Swiss francs Friday. 


AMEX Most Actives 


*AoM 

Dvdinua 

Uncharged 

Taial 

New Hi or*. 
New Lew* 


116 126 

263 259 

236 228 

81S 813 

11 12 

IS 17 


3-MONTH PIBOR (MATIF1 

FFS million 

- pti a* 180 pel 

Jan 

9864 

96-42 

See 

9849 

9865 

Dee 

9832 

9838 

Mar 

9810 

94J6 


9103 

9X2? 

scp 

93-53 

93-65 

Dee 

9X34 

9X31 

Mar 

9X18 

9X15 


EjoLA 

Ivo*Cp 

ChevSfi x 

HanvCiY 

Hasbro 

VtocB 

EcnoBoy 

Viocmri 
RavatO g 
AvK7.it*> 


Voi 

Htah 

Low 

Last 

otg. 

1(601 

1 

l"2. t 

1*. 


6951 

171. 

\P% 

IF. 

-Hi 

S^46 

18 — 

17^ 

18'-, 

. 1 2 

5253 

6*v 

O'j 

6*0 


40<2 

32*. 

32*-: 

37't 


3*63 

29 


? T *y 

l m 

32® 

I0**> 


10': 

—Mi 

3300 

8 


r.'|, 


29V4 

4'i- 

3'v. 

3 - — 

— * l a 

2976 

* 

7* 1 

i 

—1 


SSASMQ Diary 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unchanged 

Tolalrssues 

New Higns 

New lows 


Spot Commodities 


Market Sales 


NYSE 
Amex 
Nasdaq 
in millions. 


Commodity Today 

Aluminum, lb & 6 D 6 

Coffee. Brat. ID l.tf 

Cooper eiecfroMIc. lb 136 

Iron FOB. Ion 21330 

Lead, lb 034 

Silver. Iroy or 5335 

Sied l scrap). Ion 13733 

Tin. lb 3J169 

Zinc lb 0453 


Esl. volume: 40.160 Open tot: 2IL$*9. 
LONG SILT (UFFB) 
isuao - pw A 32aOi of IN act 
Job 103-26 102-26 103-00 -0-09 

Sea 102-21 101-12 101-23 — M9 

Dec N-T. N.T. 100-23 —MB 

Est volume; 61779. open tot: 1353D2. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
DM 2SB380- PtS Of 100 PCt 
Jun 9430 9334 9119 — 030 

SCO 9336 72.42 9159 — 0-W 

Dec 7150 9138 9117 —032 

Est. volume: 172.1 17. Open bn.: 166*31. 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONOS (MAT IF) 

F FMMM-Pls at IBB act 
Jn 116.14 11738 117.42 +0.12 

Sep 117.18 116-40 Ito-Q +014 

Dec 11632 115.91 1153B +D.14 

| Est. volume: 265,917. Open tot.: 146398. | 


PMC C mrt td a 33 &-X 7-1 7 

SPECIAL 

SkyWest Inc - W 7-1 

INITIAL 

DeBOTtotO Wt r - -MS 0-30 7-20 

REGULAR 

<3 375 6-30 9-15 
_ 3S 6-15 6-30 
O 30 7-6 8-1 

M 383 6-15 7-1 

M 3S8 6-15 7-1 

O £i 8-19 9-2 

Q 38 6-13 6-17 
Q 32 6-13 6-27 
a SI 7-15 5-1 

O 31 6-23 7-7 

S M 6-15 6-30 
34 6-15 7-8 

O 35 6-17 7-1 


PepsiCo Plans South African Venture 

JOHANNESBURG (Reuter) — PepsiCo Inc, said. Mo ptfay it was 
returning to South Africa in a joint venture portrayed as the- bluest post- 
apartbdd foreign investment in the country and a vote of confidence in 
itS future. . ' -re . 

“We’re looking, over time, at an investment m exces s ot Sl Wmflhon. 
caid T an WQsoo, a spokesman for Egoli Beverages LP, winch win own 75 
percent of the venture, to be called New Age Beverages Ltd. Pepsi wig 
hold 25 percent. - - : - ; 


-t25 8-16 9-10 



a 34 6-76 6-23 

M IS 7-1* 7-26 

M JM B-M 8-23 

M 35 9-20 9-27 

M 371 7-19 7-26 

M 371 8-16 8-23 

M 371 9-20 9-27 

0 33 6-17 7-5 

<3 37 8-26 9-10 


o-annuoU B-payaMo in cemoman tundt; m- 
moatMr; o-auortertr; t+emHmmiai 


GE Plastics Building nant in Chma 

PITTSFIELD, Massachusetts (AP) — GE Plastics is buSMing-a S50 
million plant in <*3wna, company officials ann ounced Monday. 

“We see immense opportunities and strong demand,” saki Gary L 
Rogers, president of GE Plastics. “The new capaaty wiD give us an 
unmatched ability to service a rapidly growing market." 

The division of General Electric Co. makes high-perfornmicc thermo- 
plastics for cars, computers, telephones and other gpods/Ihe plant, in the 
southern city of Nansfaa. will be ready within two years and is expected to 
produce 20,000 tons of thermoplastics a year, a company spokesman said. 


Industrials 


To subscribe in France 


HWl Low Lust Settle CbUr I 
I GASOIL (IPE) ! 

Ui. Ooflcry per metric too l u t > at 1B8 tno» I 
Jun 151 30 14875 I4L75 14930 — 1.00 I 

Jul 15225 15025 15025 150-25 — 130 ! 


justcaD, toll free, 
05-1 37 437 


For the Record 


l U.S . Eases Into a Less Strident Approach on Japan Trade 


American Papng Inc. said it was granted a nationwide Private Carrier 
Paging frequency by the Federal Communicadcais Commission, giving it 
one-way paging frequency throughout the United States. . (Ratters) 
Continental Airlines Inc. filed with the Securities and Exchange Com- 
mission to sell as much as SI billion of pass-through certificates arid debt- 
securities. - ( Bloomberg f 


Continued from Page 9 

duced Iasi December’s Uruguay 
Round world trade accord on" the 
General Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade. 

President Bill Clinton, he ex- 
plained. had been “right to set Dec. 
1 5 as a deadline lor the GATT." He 
added: “That pressure was critical. 
In this case, given the political situ- 
ation in Japan, and the complexity 
of the framework talks, such a 
deadline would not be helpful." 

This week in Tokyo, talks will be 
held on the automobile and ante. 


pans sectors between Sozaburo 
Okamatsu. deputy minister for in- 
ternational trade and industry, and 
Jeffrey Garten, the U.S. undersec- 
retary of commerce for internarion- 
al trade. 

A Japanese official, meanwhile, 
said progress was being made on 
framework talks focused on gov- 
ernment procurement of medical 
technology and telecommunica- 
tions. 

Mr. Kantor said the U.S. dead- 
line of June 30 remained, by which 
time progress needed to be made 


with Japan in the medical and tele- 
coms sectors to avoid the activation 
of sanctions under the Super 301 
U.S. trade law. 

“We have a coincidence between 
the framework talks and the issues 
converging just before Naples." he 
said. “That tends to concentrate 
the mind." 

Turning to U.S. talks with Chi- 
na. Mr. Kantor said the application 
of Super 301 also remained an op- 
tion if progress was not made by 
June 3Q in the field of intellectual 
property. 


He said the United States and 
the European Union had achieved 
“more agreement’ ‘ on requiring 
that China “play by the rules" cif 
world trade before ii could hope to 
become a member of the World 
Trade Organization, the successor 
to GATT. 

Finally, Mr. Kantor said the 
United States was in agreement 
with the European Union. Japan 
and Canada to reject Singapore’s 
bid to host the first ministerial 
meeting or the World Trade Orga- 
nization. 


Weekend Box Office 


The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — “The Flic Ls tones" dominated the U. S. box office 
with a gross of S18 million over the weekend. Following are the Top 10 . 
moneymakers, based on Friday ticket sales and estimated sales for 
Saturday and Sunday. J 


1. "The FUntslones" 

t Universal} 


Sigmflitan 

X -Maverick' 

IWOmer Brothers} 


no minion 

1 'Beverly HldsCoa III' 

(Paramount) ■ 


*65 minion 

8 'Rmafssonoe Mon" 

(Touchstone Pictures) 


SSJmllftan 

X “The Cowboy Wav' 

(universal! 


S6 million 

6- The crow- 

(Miramax) 

• - 

. S4 mil Han 

7. 'When a Mari Loves a Woman’ 

(Touchstone Pictures! 


S3J million 

X “Four Weddings and a Funeror 

IGramercy) 


Slim Utlon 

9. 'Crook lyn’ 

(Universal) 


180X000 

IX "The Etufless Summer II" 

(New Line Cinema) 


5660000 


W©gg§.D STOCK MARKETS 


Ayence Fitnca fttom Juno 6 
Close Frov. 


U.S. FUTURES 

Via Auadafcd 


Season Season 

HiWl Low 


Cfcen Hmn Lo* Close dig Op-lm 


Season Season 
Hsh LOW 


Opon rfgn Law Ouse Cha Oalw 


Season Season 
Hah 1 m 


CV*n High Low dene Cho Op-lm 


Amsterdam 


Helsinki 


ABN Amro Hid 
ACF Holding 
Aoson 
AhoW 
Akzo Nobel 
AMEV 

Eote-Wesoonetl 

CSM 

DSM 

Elsevier 

Fokker 

Ghrt-Brocodes 

HBG 

Heine): mi 

Hoooovera 

Hunter Dountos 

INC Ca land 

inter Mueller 

InTI Nederland 

KLM 

KNP BT 

Med Hard 

OcoGrtnten 

Pothced 

Philips 

Polyarnm 

Robeco 

Rodamco 

Ralinco 


Amer-YUtyma 

EnspGufnll 

Hutitatnakl 

K.aP. 


Atetra 

Nokia 

Pohloto 

Reoola 

Stod u nawi 


133 133 

38 3830 
210 209 
11.90 1130 
113 112 

176 176 

420 426 

79 85 

8930 90JH) 
230 210 


Madrid 


HEXIndnM77631 

PrevhHnTlh7jW 


BBV 3175 31B0 

Bco Central HUP. 2920 2940 

Botnb Santander 4790 4770 

Banesio 1040 1070 

CEPSA 3310 3315 

□raoodas NA 2335 

Endeso 6420 6450 

Ercras 235 222 

Iberdrola 1005 1010 

Retool 4330 4320 

Tabocakra 4100 4030 

Telefonica 1905 1885 


Hong Kong 

37.50 
11-20 
38J5 
4125 
10.70 


Gen. Eaur 24S 2410 

Havas 453 447 JO 

l metal 565 552 

Lata roc Coo oec 402.ID 407 

Legrond 6110 6290 

Lyon. EOU7 566 557 

Oreol (L‘) 1164 1141 

L.VJA.H. 888 888 

froira-Hadwlle ill 110.50 
MlcMUn B 227 JO 226J0 
Moulinex 143USJ0 

Paribas 392.40 417 

Pectilnev Inti 16630 143 

Pemod-Rlcord 384 380 

Peuoeol 815 B2D 

Prtntemps (Aul «42 949 

Radio technique 473 471 

Rn- Poulenc A 135 JO 137-50 


SI me Darbv 
SIA loro Ian 
Slwe Lund 
S pore Press 
Stow Steamship 
S"Pore Telecomm 
strafh Trodlrw 
UOB (orelen 
UOL 




382 382 
1200 12 J 0 
745 7.40 
1540 1540 
4.16 4.12 
142 3.46 
340 364 
11 JO 11.90 
325 323 
: 2271-91 


Stockholm 


RoH. St. Louts NA 1640' 


Royal Dutch 
Stork 
Unilever 
Van Ommeren 
VNU 

Walters/Kluwer 
EOE index : 40745 
Prtvlan : «*3J8 


Brussels 



a 

>.'ji 



1*jwZ 


L" fc -L J 




AG Fin 
Arbed 
Barca 
Bekaert 

Cockxrltl 

Cobepo 

Delhaize 

Electrnbel 

GIB 

GBL 

Gevaert 

Kredletbank 

Fefraflna 

Powvrfln 

Royal Beipe 


2690 2670 
4790 4858 
2350 2350 
24975 24900 
187 186 

6000 MOO 
1356 1158 
5750 5690 
1545 1520 
4485 4410 
9490 9150 
6730 6450 
NA 10750 
3120 3050 
5010 4940 


Bonn Corrnn 
BasJoal 

Benetton aroun 

Ooa 

CIR 

Cmd Hal 
Enktiem 
Ferfln 
F nr fl n Rise 
Flat SPA 
Finmeccanica 
Generali 
IFI 

Itatcem 
I taigas 

Itahnoblikn-e 

Mediobanca 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RA3 

Rlnascente 

Salpem 

San Paolo Torino 

SIP 

SME 

Sola 

Standa 

Stef 

Toro ASSI RJSB 


5a Irrt Gooaln 
S.E.B. 

Ste General e 
Suez 


644 647 

540 535 

600 617 

305.90 309 AO 



Thomson-CSF 1 70 JO 170. 


Tolal 316J 

DAP. 15121 

Valeo na 

CAC 48 index: 3037.15 
Prevtan : 2041 74 


316J0 322JO 
15120 15340 
NA. 252-50 


AGA 400 385 

Asea A 607 604 

Astra A 172 im 

Artos Cocca 96 475 

Eledrahj* B 38» 387 

Ericsson 40’ 404 

Esselle-A 127 123 

Handelsbanken 105 106 

Investor B 188 184 


Sao Paulo 


Banco do Broall 34J0 32J0 



Ban+soa 

Bradesco 

Brahma 

Ceram 

Efetrabras 

l touliarco 

Light 

Paranaoarvema 

Petrobras 

SomoCnn 

Telehras 

Teieso 

Usiminas 

Vale Rio Poa> 

Varlo 


16.99 17 JO 
14.70 23 

540 470 

138 119 

475449.99 
45D 401 

430 480 

3* 38 

306 IBS 
11000 10750 
84.10 78.10 
635 *01 

33* Z15 
218 301 

315 715 


Norsk Hydro 
Procordla AF 
Sanavlk B 
5CA-A 
5-E Bcaken 
S*and la F 
SkonVa 
SKF 
Stora 

Tretleborg BF 
Volvo 




236 233 

134 122 

115 116 

115 116 

50 49 JO 
118 117 

181 183 

143 143 

412 410 

110 111 
747 734 

: 1872-57 


Mitsui and Co 
Mllsukashl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
NIVJio Securities 
Nippon Kogaku 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Steel 
Nlopon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
NTT 

Olympus Optical 

Pioneer 

Ricoh 

Sanyo Elec 

Sharp 

Shlmaru 

Shlnetsu Chem 

Sony 

Sumitomo Bk 
Sumitomo Chem 
Suml Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 
Tatsel Corp 
Talsho Marine 
Tokcda Chem 
TDK 
Telim 

To*:yo Marine 
Takvo Elec Pw 
Topoan Prtoilng 
Torav i no. 
Toshiba 
Toyota 

Yamaichl Sec 
a: x too 


'I J0 l(L570a 95 lljl 11-70 11J! 

1IJ0 1088 Mar 96 

Eft sates NA. FrVs. sales 11 J07 

Fr.-sooen wr 12 94157 up 131 

COCOA (NCSE7 ilrM.cn.iwwi 


Grains 




JKUjgJ* •>»* 

prerrops . 1109 


Sac Gen Benaue 8240 8340 
SocGen Belglaua 2320 2320 
Soflno 15175 15025 

So4vay 14550 14850 

Troctebel 10100 9900 

UCB 24800 7*550 

Union Mlnlere 2655 2635 

sssffl By : M0UB 


Frankfurt 


AEG 

Allkxir Hold 
Altana 

Asha 

BASF 

Boyer 

Bay. Hypo bank 
Bay Verelnsbk 
BBC 

BHF Bank 
BMW 

Commerzbank 

Continental 

Daimler Benz 

Degussa 

Dt Babcock 

Deutsche Bank 

Douetas 

Dresdner Bank 

Feldmuehle 

F KajPp haesch 

Harpener 

Henkel 

Hochtief 

Hoecfts t 

Hotanaim 

Horten 

IWKA 

Kail Sab 

Kantodf 

Kauthot 

KHD 

KieecfcnerWerkc 

Unde 

Luhttansa 

MAN 

Mannesmann 
Metollgesell 
Muenctl Rueck 

Porsche 

Prevssas 

PWA 

RWE 

_Phelnmelgll 

Schering 

SEL 

Siemens 

Thysien 

Vorta 

Vet» 

VEW 

yum 

Volkswagen 

weiia 

DAX Index : 2163J7 
Previous : 314X39 
FAZ Index: 81666 
PntiMiHUi 


ToOur Readers 
Stock prices from 
Johannesburg. Lon- 
don. Montreal, Sydney 
and Toronto were not 
available Monday due 
to problems ai the 
source. We regret the 
inconvenience. 


Accor 643 683 

AlrUuulde 799 7S4 

Alcatel Abthom 628 631 

Axo 1333 LLte 

Baicalre (Cle> 534 S4« 


Singapore 


BIC 1265 1250 

BNP 254J0 2S3J0 

Bouypues 657 647 

BSN-GD 838 833 

Corryfour 1910 1917 . 

C.CF. 236J0 231 

Cbvs NJL 107-211 

Choroeur^ N.A. 1394 

Oments Franc NA. 317 

CtubMed 412.50 419 JO 

E t- Aquitaine 4 tn <0660 

EJf-Sanotl 883 877 

.Euro Disney 36 JO 34 jn 


Cerebos 
City Dev. 

DBS 

Fraser Neave 
Gem Ins 


Golden Hooe PJ 2^9 


Hume Industries 5 JD 


409 <06 M 
883 877 

36 JO 34 jn 


(nchcoae 5.75 

Kwoel 1060 

KLKeoong 3.1B 

Lum Chano r_4j 

Malayan Bank? BA0 

OCBC foreign 13,10 

OUB 6-JO 

OUE a-SO 

SemixJwano n.«o 

Shengrlla 5^5 


Tokyo 

Akot Eiectr 
Aschl Chemical 
Ajani Gloss 
Bank of Tokyo 
Brtdg+itone 
Canon 
Casio 

Dal Nippon Print 
Do two House 
Daiivo Securities 
Fanuc 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 
Fulllsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Coble 
Honda 
Ito Yokaoo 
Itochu 

Japan Airlines 
Ko|lma 
Kansal Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kvocera 
Matsu Elec inds 
Matsu Elec Whs 
Mitsubishi 8k 
Mitsubishi Kasei 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Hev 
/Altsublshl Corp 


NIUel 32S : 30727 

Previous : 20TS4 



Zurich 


Ad la inti B 253 258 

Alusulsse B new 647 661 


BBC Brwn Bov B 1Z33 1277 

CJbo Geigv B 875 870 

CSHoWtnosB 611 625 

EleklrnwH 361 351 

FbtJierB 1430 hid 

Inter discount B 2440 2390 

Jelmotl B 800 885 

Landis Gvr R B80 885 

Atoevennlck B 440 431 

Nestle R 1176 1147 

Oerirk. Buehrle R 145 1 46 

Por pesa Hid B 1640 1675 

Roche Hdg PC 6W0 6710 

Safro Republic 129 120 

SandaiS 725 712 

Schindler B 7650 7600 

, sutw PC 914 en 

Surveillance B 2115 2100 

Swiss Bnk Corp B 420 407 

Swiss Relnsur « 607 593 

Swissair R 780 778 

UMB 1245 1215 

Winterthur B 749 730 

Zurich Ass B 1415 1385 

58S index : 779 jt 
P revious : 9*5.42 



875 870 
611 625 
361 351 
1430 1410 


B80 885 

440 431 

1176 1147 



WHEAT (CB0T) UDODu mnimum- <K«in pe 
156 2.96 All 94 129V: 3J2 125 

3-57 L, 3.DJ Sea 94 133 131'j 131 H 

JA5 3J» Dec »4 3J6 150 143V. 

3-57 157 War 95 J50 lSIW 147 

150W 116 H May 95 141 344 140 

X424« 311 All 95 3JU 326 121 

Dee 95 

Est. sales I8J00 Frfs.s<*es 10J76 
Fri scoenim 4L243 up 1198 
WHEAT (KflOTl UQ 0 bu mHfihev iHcri pn 
155 2«7 JU%J 129 9> 13* 319 

lASVi 3 XT? Uj Sec 94 3J4 U7 ITU 

340 31 2W Dec 94 342 W 3451^ 3 

153'm 125 Man 143 345’n 34W* 

X24 UtVi May »5 

133 122V, Jul 95 122V) 122V) 122’a 

Est- sates NA Frfv sales 5.779 
Fn’sopenint 23,174 up 938 

CORN fCDOT) UOiDiiiWiw i . We* Mr y 
314V> 241 Jul « 264V. 2. ASA), 141V, 

2.92'A ld>V|Sep<4 162 163S 2-579i 

2-77 h 2-3* V, Dec 94 154 Z561s 2-SO 

2J915 148 4* Mar 95 MI’n 2 a2S6 157V, 

182 153 May 95 163 164» 163 

28}'4 2.54 All 95 146 V, 147*4 14314 

Z£> 156 Sep 95 

2-59 IO Dec 95 249 Vi 151 I47te 

Est sates taooo Fri's. sates 55.uo 
Frrsoswnw 254463 Oft 1570 
SOYBEANS (CBOH 1400himMiwn-a*in 
750 554V, Jul 94 470 6.73 656V) 

715 6J2S Aug 94 470 173 156 

JJ8*. 1(7 Sep 94 6J3 157 1415: 

757V) 555V, Nov 94 645 146W 12954 

6.97V, 4.13 Jon 95 446 V) 651 135 

7.0216 618 Mct 9S 15GW 4^4 V, 6.« 

7.B2'm 171 MOV 95 6J3lj 45SVy 641V) 

rjn 634 jutes 454 457 low 

»J0Vi 5.61V) 05 114 6.16 101 

Es». sates NA Wv sates 57. iw 
Fn’s open ini 149475 ertt 1183 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) ltersns- do+npor 
230.00 1 65.20 Jul 94 174-50 HiOB I70JJQ 

22100 ISlDOAugW 19500 19120 1N80 

21000 1*1 10 SCO 94 1 9350 1*450 I B3B0 

3)100 laoooOdte 192J0 17330 wjg 

209 JO ITUDOecM 19100 19300 165.90 

201 JO 17600 Jen 95 1*150 19150 11140 

78350 1IIJBMCT-9S 194 00 I94JB 180.00 

» 'to50 18900 

19*50 182 JO JlH 91 

Est. scries 64JOO Fri's. sous 16.983 
Fn ioocnlm 66579 up 66? 

SOYBEAN OSL (CBOT1 sun-MNnwio 


Pcsne 

131V. -101 24.562 

137'.. -OX'.. 8,971 
148 V,— O.X V, 12.957 
3-52' 4 — G.X' • '492 
342’— OX 1 . 58 
U6 201 

334 ? 


aja'.i-ooov) 12437 

136’., 4.741 

344 — (Ul 4.732 
14SSS -0.XV, 805 
1404 *8X15 17 

122 ^-unu 21 


1466 999 Jul 94 1331 1342 1303 

1485 1 270 Sep 94 1361 1371 1332 

ISP 10*1 Dec 94 1392 1399 1369 

15*0 1077 Mix 95 1429 1479 1400 

1570 1078 May 95 1430 UJQ 1428 

1593 1225 Jul 95 

1350 1245 i® 95 

1570 1290 Dec 95 

140* 1350 Mar 94 

Est. sates NA Fri's. sates 743S 

Fri’s open M 79427 g ft »I3 

ORANGE JUICE (NCTTO iSBOOWs-ansacr 

13100 9255 Jul 94 99,25 99i5 9550 

13*50 9SJ0Seo94 1QI40 10140 98.10 

134 JO 96.25 Nov 94 lain IffLX 100JD 

132.00 97.70 JOT 95 10450 10450 101-25 

17A25 W75MOT95 1Q5X 105JO IE-50 

11425 10050 Mov 95 10450 10650 104JD 

119.00 I05J0 Jl4 95 

II1J0 1ll50Seii 95 

Nov 95 

BJ. soles 35M Fri's strtes 1000 
Fn's open tot 


— 56 11-531 
— ft SLOTS 
—52 9428 
—56 8,777 
-56 2.936 
-56 7566 
— 5o 1.168 
—56 2425 

—56 3 


Fh's ope n to 2,708^6 up 23106 
BRUtSH POUND (CMER) I pp r o und - 1 ptl lie M * SAQJPl 
1 5226 1 404 Jun 94 15043 1JJH6 1JOS* 1.50W *12 3X682 

52W I +HOStpV* 1JB0B 15072 15008 15MB *12 6.9W 

-22 1J 030 15030 15030 15036 *8 »1 

1.5170 1.4640Ma*flt 1J026 . -*6 14 

Est- sates NA Fri's soles 21. PG 
Fri's aaen Ini 44788 off 103* 

CANADUNDOU-AR (CMBt) nwctr- I B Ckee n asSMCO’ 

OJB05 0.71 '3 Jun 9* 0.773 DJJ90 OJ232 07283 +Z7 365C 

2™ 07S3 *» uw 

OJ670 0.7^8 Dec 94 07710 OJZZS 07210 OI227 -r34 Ij® 

?-?!R0Mot95 07175 07197 07190 07202 *37 646 

°-'” 75 87,75 07,45 07,79 *+• i» 

U. _ 07157 *48 II 

Ed. soles NA Fr, -S sates 10478 

Fn saoentlt 53JD1 10 880 . . . . - 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) sew<nwk. 1 peWwMAMegi 
£22? J2S 4 OJBO ° 03073 -91)0131 

J2S S^iSSSESI S-SSi °-S5 asws ajn3 — *0 2A.IU 

°- S97B 0-5963 05774 0JB74 -HI .30 

0*040 059(10 Am 95 DJW0 — M 55 

05C01D 05B10MOT96 05981 Hl3 *S 

sales NA Frfi. sates 1D3J10 
Frl sopenurt 137.798 OH IQ3B 

■jAJA^SEYSe roen i» ewto PO«— htewweol 
QJ09956D. 008871 Jun 94 DJ094950J075050J094790jn9sn *1 n ”1 

OJICOI^.0009^94 aS 

-J l.lg 


.*27 36,613 

*29 an 

*34 1JE 
*37 616 

*46 119 

*48 II 


—375 11522 
—370 6,168 
-3.15 1530 
—3.15 2585 
— 355 1JM7 
—185 

—xas 

-3M 

-355 


2AT'»— OJt 108.2*0 
760 V,— a 0854 36,227 
253 — Oj 39 91033 
2J8te— OOB'-S 10523 
253*5-aOB'A 1505 
2549,-OJB 2507 

255 -0.06 II 
150 -OSSPA 2,767 


Metals 


— M SS 
— U 452 


NIGRAOeaOPFER (NCMX1 XSAOBbv^caru 
10770 74.10 Jun 94 103-40 10250 101 70 

107.75 7470 All 94 10350 10250 101.« 

10180 74.90 Seo 94 I DUO 102.70 1 0170 

10350 7 575 Dec 94 10150 10150 10070 

95J0 76.90 Jem 95 

99 JO 73J0 Feb 95 


'BOrfenlM 

6-W-v— 075W 
6 JW 6 -0.2554 

642 — 07744 
671 -OTPv ' 
655 W— 078*6 
6X3 -076 

643 -0J5 
A44VJ— 075 V, 
6JS5.-0.1J 


I07J0 73.00 Mar 95 101 JO 101 JO 9970 

101.10 76ASMor95 
100.90 78.00 Jul 95 

105.00 7530 Aug 95 10250 10250 101 70 

9*55 79.10 Sep 95 SSL00 9850 «B-73 

927D 757000 95 

92-00 7775 New 95 

SS S3S?S *" 
SS WJ0 WJ0 

Est. stfes BJWO Fr is. sales 55 W 
Fn's open tot 57578 on «2 
SAVER IKOAX) UMswcs-ccrbrsrWva 
568J 51 5-5 Jun 96 5285 5285 52X0 

5*6-5 371.0 AH W £*J 533J 5215 

4(1094 

S90J 376.5 Sep 9« 534.S SJ7J S26J1 

597 JJ 3*00 Dec 94 5*10 544J 534-0 

6«J 41 60 Mar 95 5500 5500 542 J 

6067 4180 May 95 5S7A 557J 5580 

*180 420JAJ95 556.Q van 5y,q 

6180 <910 Sep 9S 

628J S3?JDec95 S23J 572.0 569-S 

JOT« 5750 5710 5750 

*18J 5880 Mar 96 

Est.stees 31.000 Fri-S. sates 21 JJ? 

Fri's ooan tot 127.071 up 814 
P5ATWUM (NM02) N tnwoe.. aaaorsparirm 

5S5 357 - a ’H M 39100 39! JO 39 SlS 

41SJ0 360JOOct94 aooxn 4DOJO JteJO 
SS SfAOJtr^tS 401J0 401 70 40800 
42800 39800 Apr 95 4D4JQ 40.1J0 406JI1 

EsS.stSas HA FrPs. sales 2.70* 

Fri's open M 71.9M £»‘" 

terww- tetews pwWOT. 
385110 577J0 

4I5J0 341 JO A UB 94 38270 3KLS0 J88AJ 

417J0 344.00 Oa 9* 38570 StJ SS 

30.00 Dec 94 3B8J0 3097B WM 
36150Feb?S 39240 39L4Q )yijo 

f* 7 -°0 364J0 Aot*5 39800 J7S 00 39800 

%% WJ0 
41170 4IOJOCW95 \ 

429.00 «8MDk95 

424.50 4l2J0Fdb96 . 

_ *OT96 

Csr.Hfn js.ngo Fri's. scies 3U6I 
Fn's opon tot 1*1,778 aft <234 


— 6J0 30J50 
—800 14-759 
-*J0 10.S7 
—7.00 5^27 
—870 17v469 
-890 1,735 
-7JB 1.746 
-850 360 

— 7JB 281 


120 120 
725 712 

7650 76« 
914 898 


JOS3 IIJSArt** 27 AO 27+4 HM 

3865 7185 Aug 94 2755 77J3 ST 

» 3* a.«5CBM 27 JO 2745 2871 

2954 22.IOOCI9* 2890 2895 1825 

28J7 22X0 Dec 94 2845 2850 25.75 

28J5 2285 Jot 95 2825 3830 75 Ml 

»J0 78m MOT 95 25.95 2800 S45 

2805 7862 May 95 2590 25.90 2SJ1 

7745 7445 Jul 95 2870 2870 J5J3 

Esi. sates aw trrv soles 17,433 
Fri's ooen tot 85.113 up 809 


2809 -899 25059 

268* —0.99 14J93 

2872 —0 99 W.9I0 

26J5 -1J0 7^68 
25.78 — X97 HL*37 

2540 — 1J0 2.906 

25.45 -1J0 1,94? 

1SJ3 -1.0C 906 

25J3 -800 19* 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CMER) waaien-MsawP 
7877 62J0 jun *4 6110 6815 62.90 

7U7 6lCAuq<4 62J5 6825 62X0 

7810 683000 94 6840 *785 44.94 

7*30 67 JO Dec 94 6800 69.10 Mon 

IUS 62.90 Feb 95 69.30 70.05 *9.10 

7810 6* 40 Apr 95 7MS 7US 7050 

71 JO (8 90 API *5 6820 4830 S7J5 

EsLsdes 282)6 Fn's. soles 70819 

Fri's p ccnlw 78IM up 1*45 

FEEDS! CATTLE (CMER) tupst-Mu 


*023 10457 
•067 28.165 
•O-SS 18366 
♦042 9,851 
♦034 8159 
—OB7 7459 
—0.13 574 


TO OUR READERS 
IN GREAT BRITAIN 

it’s never been easier to subscribe 
and save. Just call toll-free: 

0 800 89 5965 


8300 Tl.lOAug** T2J0 7172 71 JS 

*1.70 71J05eP»4 71,90 73J5 71 JB 

11-35 TlJOOaM 7707 7145 71.95 

88.00 TL4SNPV94 7X43 7875 73JS 

8095 71*5 JOT 9* 7X65 7X00 7045 

BOB 7U5MOT96 7155 7800 TWO 

7885 72A5 Apr »6 

Esusdes 137* Fri'x sates l.70» 

Fn's open uv 11636 up ? 

HOGS (CMER) 4Untbi-<M,NrL 


• I JO 7.130 
•Ota 2.136 
•OSS 2JW 

•945 1,627 
♦050 US 
*070 66 

4) 


—TAD 1 J78 
— 1.15 38577 
— I JS 10166 
— 005 5A6 
-085 
—090 

-ass 2J84 
— 1.10 

— 1JS 710 
— l.U 
— IJ0 
— 1 JO 
— 0-95 

— 1-00 660 
— rjo 

— 1.00 2 
—0.95 


OJ101 SH0O991 5Am 95 

0_mm2SUW«aQMcr96 0J0M9B 

EftscteS NA Fri-x sates 48909 
Fris 0 Pe*t oil 70588 up 2923 

FRA NC (CUBt) lpcrhK-lpdnliw6sSUail 
nrli! D - 73 ® O -™ 74 07041 0^0 

J^J90 04600 Sep 94 OTD64 07D79 OlTOM 03QS7 
D71&S D 4885 Dec 94 07068 07085 07068 0.7067 
jSjlS 0J1 27 

_. Mot 96 n tubs 

gl. sales NA Fri's. sates 38.787 
Fri's opon inf 40580 off 711 


Industrials 


—4a 11952 
—88 I6J31 
—89 5.727 
— 5J 1033 
-11 IJ 22 
—52 

—S3 0084 


COTTON 2 1NCTN) XMks-cMlnro 
7XAD SJ '* 0 "■ W n - ,S 

7040 59 Oct 94 77.90 7005 77JS 

7075 MQBW 7804 JSJ» 75J6 

2-S 62-SMOr 95 77 J7 77-07 76J5 

6400 May 95 77 AI 7155 7730 

7A2S 7050 Jul 95 7110 7O10 77J5 

J+95 71000095 7850 784) 7840 

Eftwles SJW Fri's. sates 80W 

Fri's aaen n 

HEATING OO. (NMBI) 41400 aa-csvspww 
57 JO 41.70 Jul 94 4840 «« 

ffr *»-90 49 JO 41lf 

43J0 Seo 94 49 Je gag « , Q 

S-5 5* 5006 soio 


41 A3 —049 10097 
7745 —O® 0271 
7594 —042 332' 

7677 -071 3JM 

77 jo -tM .un 

7740 — 0*3 403 

7437 -088 . . 


—110 TOD? 
-110 5.155 
- 2.10 

—210 1J03 


—330 1.903 
— 0J0 

— OJO 78757 
—040 5409 

-J48 28506 
—060 5425 
—040 833S 
—440 7.798 
-070 
—040 

-)J0 855) 
— 1.10 

—I JO 20 


Financial 


aP*T' ^ *1 nMion- dSq r kM do. 

| S£S ssllfs 

?L05 93.90 MOT 9] 98a Sjb 7 <^ 

Ed SOteS NA Frt's.SS 85T ** * 0J * >•»> 

Frfsopcntol 35J75 aft 1274 

1 17-05103-075 JunJS^ls’lSS’Tw-’H^lSSfc "si? 

Sw 104 '” *5 W « I *2 

Sft VSJfn awTcrsa-T- 

115-01 101-1* VP 94 l5l0S l£-» fcv St5 * 7 119.958 

K SS : 3 ,s fS 

105-92 *9,70 h««< ,0 *-IO * 18 M 


56.77 4LFJutl*4 4850 47 JO 4645 

55J? 4SJ0 Art 94 3630 4940 4630 

5130 44J0AM93 65J0 4615 45J0 

4975 42450094 <790 4170 41*0 

SOLS) 4105 Dec** 4345 405 434? 

50 JO <11 D Feb 95 4US 6810 43J0 

< 8 tB «.*0 aot45 4100 8U5 4180 

51 JO 47,81 Jun 95 4695 39JD 4.W 

4645 47 JO Art 95 4670 36 ta 4845 

Esl. soles TAX FrTi sates 10J9B 
FrisoPHlM 30.753 UP 7*6 

PORK BELUE3 (CMER) «HB 0 hs- ewesw 
4100 39 JO Art PJ 41 JS 41 JS 

59 JO 3* JO Aug 94 *L50 41 70 «J0 

61.15 39 10 Feb 95 47 AD 4650 4742 

6090 30iflM(r*S <BU0 47.90 47.10 

41 JM 4280 MW *5 49 *5 5835 4945 

32 JO SQJD Jtrt*5 

50J5 49J5Auo95 

Esi sales l Ala Fri's urtn 2489 
FrPsooaiW &A90 irtt <7 


>047 83*9 
- 1.40 10A0I 
*1.47 7465 
<875 4JXM 
*082 1974 
*045 715 

*1US «U 

. D 13 |7S 

• 0 J 2 18 


•1.15 8741 
•009 L235 

• Ota 4X 

* 0.08 36 
— IJ0 36 

13 

-030 2 


5170 SS 

5S-2S 5245 SBJ5 5lS 

SSSlS? 53,0 5110 5240 

■2'5S b * S 4175 S2J5 •?>-»; 

M Sa£" ™ ss ss 

|| zasssrsz 23 zm 

H s-SaSbI* *■“ ^ 

SOJO <6S55ep9S 

Oa 9S 52X0 52.00 SJO 

5270 5270 

Est *** JOJ^Frt'sSL 5170 

ori^ai/ 

StS vA »S 

ss iiSM ill ill 

19 ^ IIefSE U-S I 7 - 33 nS 

H S&3 I | ii 

1 %sss*i& 1 i 

1-2 1805 Jul 95 l7J0 

S ,7 ^° >7*« 

Si 7 1642 oa 93 

!i'g D.lSNovJs 
"BO 1850 Dec 95 

J»i5Mar9e 
Sf’ 11.22 Am Vo 

73405 Fn's. BO- 1124 m 

TSmSSUS a,7JIU °»a 


isss#’ 

-0JST17M 

-Ml 

-Ml'&OJ 
-051 1817* 
—046 B.W 

—041 4J6S 

-cat aw. 

—032 U7I 

-an .145 
—026 u» 


piiH’H 

lr " ri( 

4tK> vt ' 

f Dft'C* 


Inilm 


18.11 -ojnueja. 
1749 -002 6X47* 


1741 —0-W 

1740 — Qi O f 36757 

17-3* —002 144* 

1731 — 0XD»4* 
17 JO -lUBMJg 
17.22 -UlMtW 
i7j8 -002 row 
17J9 -001 IW 

1732 —001 

1736 -OB1I5457 

1740 —O01-64N 

1744 -O0I 
H4B —001. fS 

-001 1^7 
1746 -001 1® 

1742 —001 IW® 
1740 —001 — 
1746 -001 W3«5 


JJOjEadedcajouhe (nmqu -™ 
joa aioAnw a3rnV M SS‘ 

*CJ0 43.90 Aua U am Sr 45 ***> 

81m S2CU?.. SMO 53 IK a 15 

S3 IS s| 

33%u SS S-S 

Fri's oaentol 98775 torf 1 440 


105-22 99-20 Jun 95 

BLOKS 79.997 Fri's. 5«s 17 SJ 09 

fnsooenlrrt 772 J77 afl 7,05 


103-15 - >3 


Bend oer gal ■ ■ _ r „ 
S48 -0J15T4P 
52-54 -046 a»5 
51.74 -036 10712 

4M* -on 4JJ1 

4041 . —024 
5291 —031 24* 
5777 _a3J 100 
51.92 —021 X71 


US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) 

119-29 91-06 Junta l»la '*«!• 

I IB-21 90-12 SOP 94 104- W 2r2 7 ' 20 I4J.91J 

iis w assists m » S : I W 

aKiw^WKg: n as 

113-14 91-27 Dec *5 ’“i 7 * » 184 

11+06 98-a Mar 96 ®-» ' 20 33 

Esi.u/oi 3*0.000 Fri's. sates pjamt KMW * * « 

Fri's aaenini «53Ji* » Tuj B 

M M W OF AL BONOS iCMtiTL., 

106-07 87-06 JU0 96 mIT?" 

95-17 86-13 ScBtarwM v£n J* ' 1 ■ 22 19.507 

miOPCnn j 2«I20 un lid. 

SB 


» 35031 
5 A376 


COW EE C tNCSE) 

14550 6890 Jul *4 12740 12300 

14100 6050 Sap *6 ITU* 12100 

1 37 35 77.I0D0C94 II8J0 116* 

138DD 76WMar*5 »600 11620 

13305 82J0MOV95 116*0 11110 

13000 g&JOArtft 1 14-DO 11400 

UiOO *90OSeo9S 

Esl sales NA Ff-’s saKB 7,9*9 
Fn's open M S7.7S3 «»UO 

SUGAR-WORLD I* (N^E) 118406b 

*J5Jjl« »0» I2J9 
r* 9420 dN 1205 1208 

IlS 9.I7MOT9S 1IJ9 II.BO 

ll.9g 10076*09*5 HJS 11.77 

11 n 10 9 Art *5 31.** 11-rt 


nrja II9J6 
1 1650 I17.«0 
11400 11605 
lllta 11135 
llUO 11245 
11400 11200 
110 50 


—630 20.5*4 
—470 16.96* 
-170 IJ.JI7 
-145 1.138 
-US 763 
—850 94 

—600 J7 


5 18.507 

» 13021 


5«*ow«P twee ,55? ,n *texes 

4K75Seai4 4 S 30 Sit S? as>3a - Qis,74 S 

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HVTERNATTONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 1994 


Page Hi 


.'^vA r - 

z - **<s ■•■ 


Dutch PTT 
Is Priced 
Above 
Forecasts 


AMSTERDAM — Share prices 

^.PomlaididamunK 

wv, about to undergo the Dutch 
public sector's largest privatiza- 
tion, were set Monday « a higher- 

mT iai 49 75 * 

The offering is expected to bring 
hctweoi 6.9 billion 

and 7.9 bilhon guilders. The shares 
cm Offer ^ represent around 35 per- 
cent of the total. The government is 
ptauunm seU off another 33 per- 
cent within three years and will 
bow the rest for at least 10 years 

Negotiations lasted through 
Sunday between the government 
and the manager. ABN Amro Bank 
NY. Talks were aimed at balancing 
the amount the Dutch government 
wanted and how much several large 
Dutch pension funds were willing 
to pay. 6 

We told ABN Amro v»e 
wouldn't join in if the price was 
hgKMhan^SO guilders," said Ben 

fund of Philips Electroni'cs^NY* 

“It’s a compromise," said Wim 
ttk. the company chairman. “It 
unites everything there is at stake. 
It's well balanced." 

Manus Fleskens of Barclays de 
Zoeto Wedd described the compro- 
mise as a supermarket price, noting 
that it may also have been set at 
this level so that the 5 percent dis- 
count on shares offered to private 
investors came out exactly at Z50 
guilders. 

Glauda Canabrava of Finan- 
dele Diensten Amsterdam said 
Dutch institutions would be much 
more important than private inves- 
tors. as “index investors wiO have 
to have it" 

Mr. Fleskens said foreign inves- 
tors would have paid more, up to 5 1 
guilders. 

(AP, Bloomberg AFX) 


\ German Developer Hit 
With New Allegations 

By Brandon Miichener 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — German prosecutors on Monday broadened 
me scope of charges leveled against the missing property magnate 
Jurgen Schneider to include "egregious criminal bankruptcy." 

While Mr. Schneider and his wife are still at large two months 
after their disappearance, prosecutors have traced a trail of 245 
million Deutsche marks ($148 million) in transfers of company 
funds to accounts in Geneva via London and the Bahamas. 

Mr. Schneider effected the transfers with the full knowledge that 
ni& financial empire was about to collapse, which constitutes “a 
particularly egregious case of criminal bankruptcy." according to a 
spokeswoman for the Frankfurt prosecutor’s office. 

Previously, Mr. Schneider had only beat charged with one count 
of fraud. Deutsche Bank AG, his largest creditor, accuses him of 
lying on a loan application. 

An Iranian businessman. Mehdi Djawadi, is bong held without 
bail in a Frankfurt jail in connection with the suspicious transfers. 

Arrested last week because authorities feared he might flee or 
interfere with their ongoing probe; Mr. Djawadi is a former universi- 
ty professor, business partner of Mr. Schneider and carpet merchant 
with offices in Mainz and Cologne. 

His was tbe first arrest in the affair, which has won worldwide 
alien lion because of its scope, the embarrassment it caused Germa- 
ny's biggest bank and tbe flamboyant lifestyle of the Schneiders. 

Mr. Schneider disappeared in April with bis wife, Qaudia. leaving 
about ISO banks holding lOUs for about 5 billion DM and contrac- 
tors unpaid bills amounting to another 200 nrilH on DM. 


Profit Jump Lifts BAA Stock 

U.K. Airport Operator Aims to Split Shares 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 

m — — 


Compttfd by Oar StOff From Dupairha The company also said had that it wa$ about to move into Aus- 

LONDON — BAA PLC. the op- raised its annual dividend by 12.5 tralia. 
crator of seven British airports, re- percent, to 18 pence a share, to- “Wc arc shaking a lot of trees 
oorted Monday a 13 percent jump ward the top of market predictions, overseas, so you shouldn t be sur- 
ET nretnx orofit for 1993. to 022 The operator of London Heath- prised if you hear our name men- 
iSiSsiSoS *** r- '** ranks as the world’s tkmed," said Sir John Egan, die 
would seek shareholder approval in k»est mtcnuuonal airport, said chief executive. Bui we are pro- 
July to split iu stares. ttrfric tat yor a ta mpons grew cmfaug with ainion ." 

The company's share price, '* m " n SW '" S AP> 

S^‘S5SSS5SK ESfaSTJtfSS .i^^sawaAi 

dav bv 1 1 oence to close ai 949 _ The company also operates Israel announced plans on Mon- 


July to split its shares. ^ year at ns aiipons grew 

The company's share price. ^L“JF,£SX £22; 
which has quadrupled since pma- gw&. and wasset to nse 4 percent 
tization sewn yean ago, rose Mon- annually to tbe end of the century, 
day by 11 pence to close ai 949 The company also operates 
pence The stock is nevertheless Gatwrck and Stansted airports in 
down considerably from its peak England and handles about 73 per- 
for the year that was set at 1,085 cent of all British passenger traffic 

pence on Feb. !. * car ^_ traff l c ‘ 

, - BAA said income from airport 

Tne company also said it was on rha ™* last year was flat at £368 
target nearly to doiblc retailing millioa because of price cuts under 


London 
FTSE 100 index 

m-dr 

miPt - — — 

3300 — \ 


Paris 

GAC4Q 

a® — r 



space at its airports by 1997. 


a five-year pricing formula im- 


BAA also said that it had signed posed by the sector’s regulator, tbe 
an agreement with the Export- lm- Civil Aviation Authority. That left 
port Bank of Japan for a loan of BAA to seek profit growth through 
£125 million io build Heathrow Ex- greater efficiency and expansion of 
press, a rapid-transit line that will passenger shopping. 


whisk passengers from Heathrow 
Airport to central London in IS 


Meanwhile. BAA continues to 
look at opportunities u> expand its 


minutes. That trip currently takes operations overseas, but the com- 
about 45 minutes. pany played down recent reports 


Incentive AB Sweetens Cardo Bid 


pany played down recent reports 

Very briefly: 


■ Israel Sets Sale of El Ai 

Israel announced plans on Mon- 
day to sell 51 percent of its national 
airline El Ai in public share offer- 
ings at home and abroad. Reuters 
repented from Tel Aviv. 

No date was set for the sale ap- 
proved by tbe government’s priva- 
tization committee, but the Trans- 
port Ministry said it would take 
place after the once ailing carrier is 
taken out of a 13-year-long receiv- 
ership in October. 

“El a! is a national carrier and 
its shares should be sold to the 
public and not to an investor who 
would be Free to do as be pleased 
with tbe airline." Transport Minis- 
ter Yisrad Kessar said. 


1993 

Exchange 

Amste rdam 

Brussels 

Frankfurt 

Frankfurt 

Helsinki 

London 

London 

Madrid 

Milan' 

Paris 

Stockhofra 

Vienna 

Zurich 


index Monday 

Close 

AEX 407.35 

Slock Incax 7 , 608.80 

DAX 2 , 163*7 

FAZ 816.06 

HEX 1;77BJH 

HnanoaJ Times 30 Jla. 

FTSE 100 3 ffft 40 

GeneraHnctex 327.66 

M1B 1,194j0& 

CAC 4 Q 2 JB 7.15 

•Affaersvaertden 1 ^ 892^9 

Stock index 43 8-24 

SBS 97939 


^TW 

1903 

Ptbv. 


1,194.00 

2J37.15 

1jBdZS9 

43&2* 

97939 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 


403.08 +1.06 

7,608.37 +0.01 

2.148^9 +0.68 

808.75 «.9fl 

1,777.46 -OjOS 

3.379.80 

2.937.80 +6.39 

32534 +6.37 

1,189.00 +0.42 

2J41.74 -022 

1^64.14 +0,45 

440,14 -0.43 

96542 +1,45 

loKnuinnal UcraWTrflra; 


Biootntvrg Business News kronor per Ct ido share and 325 tial rights to Card o’ s present share- 
STOCKHOLM — Incentive AB kronor for each outstanding sub- holders, 
said Monday it had revised its bid scrip tion right, valuing its offer at Incentive’s offer runs out Friday 

for tbe pan of Cardo AB that it 4.7 billion kronor, but raised the and is conditional upon approval 
does not yet own and that enough bid 25 kronor Monday after criti- by shareholders representing 90 
shareholders of tbe investment rism from Cardo holders. percent of the equity by (hen. 


• Sohray SA, the Bdgian chemical company, said it expected a European • Grand Metropolitan JPLC said it hoped to raise more than £75 million 

TMSUim.' In n nut f n mvi , 1. i. 1DIU .r u u .:.. : r> _ , > , . *1 ... . ” . . . * 


"*''‘'•’“■"5 news kronor per Cardo share and 325 
STOCKHOLM — Incentive AB kronor for each outstanding sub- 
said Monday it had revised its bid scription right, valuing its offer at 


recovery to allow it to post an operating profit in 1994 after rcgisiering a 
loss of 6.91 billion francs (5202 million) in 1993. 


(SI 12.9 million) from the sale of a portfolio of 28 properties in Britain in a 
bid to take advantage of a strong property market to continue its move 
toward a concentration in its core food and beverage businesses. 


does not yet own and that enough 
shareholders of tbe investment 
company had agreed to tbe offer to 
ensure it would win control 

Incentive is part of the financial 
empire of the Swedish Wallenberg 
family. 

Incentive said that for each share 
or subscription right in tbe invest- 
ment group that shareholders own 


Monday £ at the offer by Friday, or are shari- 
Ordo shanAddm . rqjresotiqg holders of record June 22, will be 
17 percent of the equity had accept- m ti* share 

ed the new offer. Incentive already 


by shareholders representing 90 
pe ca n of the equity by then. 
Cardo shareholders who accept 


owns 44 percent. 

When 'Incentive began the bid 
for Cardo, it said it would keep 


now, it win offer a 25 kronor only Cardo’s 42 parent stake in the voivo cm aweaen said moo- 

(S3.2fl) discount if they participate medical equipment grotro Gambro ^ that w orldwide car sales rose 
in the share issue of a “new” Cardo AB. It said it would liquidate Car- ^ percent in volume terms m the 
after the completed acquisition. do’s slock portfolio valued, at 15 P* 51 , ^ 111011 ^ wiuJc 

bi ^ DU, 2 biDi . CH ; krooor -. . K^^cSTro ?£££*“• 

S?^ 5C ^H^iLS* iare * ,0 *^ ers Canto, ’^iSg oSS a RXay” vSnSi SStehi 

did not subscribe to the new issue. Cardo Door and Cardo Pump. 

Incentive bad eadier bid 500 ™ld te be with pnS 


issue in the new Cardo, Incentive 
aid- 

■ Volvo Sales Are Up 

AB Volvo of Sweden said Mon- 
day that worldwide car sales rose 
25 percent in volume terms in tbe 
first five months of 1994 while 
truck deliveries were up 35 percent. 
Reuters reported from Brussels. 
Volvo’s chief executive officer. 


• Tde-Coram macations Inc. and Bertetsmann AG confirmed they have Ioward a concentration in its core food and beverage businesses, 
scuttled a venture 10 bunch a music video and home-shopping’ cable . Kansaffis^saka-Pankki. the Finnish bank, said that it posted an 
channel targeted to compete with the U-S.-based muac network MTV. operating loss of 275 tmQion markkaa ($34.9 million) in the first four 

• Caripto, or Cassa di Risparmio delle Provincie Lombarde. which is raont ^ °f *9^- narrowed from a loss of 626 million markkaa in the same 

Italy’s largest savings bank, said it would offer a 22 percent stake to the P cn °d hi 1 993, and that it was likely to post a loss for the year as a whole, 
public a. a. price of US0 10 1750 lire (S1.45 to SI-70) per share. .Sce^WmAiri™^ 

• Geraert NV, the Belgian holding company, said it had acquired a 5 AG for 240 million kronor ($30.4 million). The subsidiary, called SA5 
percem stake in NV Koninltfjfke KNP, the Dutch paper and packaging Service Partner, posted a pretax profit of 670 million kronor on sales of 
company, by subscribing to an issue of preferred stock. 


4.8 biUioQ kronor last year. 


Return. Bloomberg. AFX, AFP 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


Unilever Suffers a Blow From Dutch Consumer Group 


The Associated Press 

AMSTERDAM — In the latest salvo of the 
Dutch soap wars, the nation's largest consumer 
group Monday warned against a controversial 
new detergent made by the Anglo-Dutch con- 
sumer products giant Unileva'. 

Unilever, makers of Omo Power, last Friday 
dropped two Dutch lawsuits against its U.S.- 
based arch-rival, Procter ft Gamble Co. 

The lawsuits chained copyright infringement 


NYSE 

Monday's Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the ctoofng or Wafl Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsawhwe. Via The Associated Press 


and misinformation by Procter ft Gamble Co., 
which had warned that Omo Power damaged 
fabrics after repeated washings. 

Unilever has denied the allegation but says it 
is chang in g the formula slightly to remove 
doubts about the product’s safety. 

A spokesman for the Duns Consumers 
Union advised shoppers Monday to defer Omo 


iambic Co- Unilever had said it dropped the lawsuits to 
3" damag e d prevent further public "squabbling through the 
courts." 

3 but says it Tbe company said Procter ft Gamble agreed 
to remove to hah its contested behavior. Proctor ft Gam- 
ble said Unilever dropped the lawsuits because 
Consumers it would not have won. 
defer Onto Unilever's claims about Omo Power have 


READOS ABE ADVISED 

that the International 

<-* +-T L- 

rmrara tnonro curtnut dm 
MdrospansSblo for factor 
d um a u m i me u mdas a ro- 
wft of tamnctiani stem- 
'lUJiy rnuu uu » it jjjii j am jjj 

which tfpot* in our paper. 
It is thaisforo rocotnmor wt- 
od that n a do n moke ap- 
propriate Inquiring baforu 
smiting any money or en- 
tering into ary binding j 
commitments. 


LEGAL SERVICES 


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>> 1994/1995. 

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Power purchases until the revised product been contested in an unusu al public campaign 



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NASDAQ 

TNs Hat compHaa by uX 

moat traded secuntesm 01 Ihe 1 -°00 

uodatadtJS^^ar value, i,, s 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 1994 


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Pi . Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 1994 


Stock Manipulation 
Suspected in India 


Return 

BOMBAY — Some Indian com- 
panies appear (o be manipulating 
their domestic stock prices before 
seeking capita! on international eq- 
uity markets, an independent re- 
search center said Monday. 

The Center for Monitoring the 
Indian Economy, a Bombay-based 
research group, said there was clear 
evidence of abnormal share price 
movements on the domestic market 
ahead of several overseas issues by 
Indian companies. The center, 
which is independently funded, 
said it had studied 24 Indian com- 
panies that floated Euroissues from 
November 1992 until April 1994. 

Indian companies raised almost 
S3 billion on international equity 
and Eurobond markets in year end- 
ed in March. 

The center said stock prices of 
Indian companies launching a 
Euroissue rose an average of 9 per- 
cent ahead of their issues being 
priced on the international market 
Afterward, it said, (he shares would 
fall on the domestic market 
“From the pricing date onwards, 
within eight to nine weeks, the ab- 
normal price rise vanishes com- 
pletely," the center’s study said. 

In many cases, the price of a 
company's shares started rising be- 
fore the board had made public its 
plans to raise capital overseas. 

The center said there was "clear 
evidence that information leaks out 
from inside the company into the 
price." 

It said there were two possible 
explanations: Either there was a 
leak that had an upward effect on 
the share value or “the manage- 
ment was bringing large resources 
to bear to manipulate the price on 
the market so as to be able to ob- 
tain a good price in the Euroissue." 

While it was probable a combi- 
nation of factors was at work, there 
was evidence to back the price- 
manipulation theory, the center 
said. 

"The ‘fair price' for the average 
global depositary receipt issue is 


thus approximately 10 percent be- 
low the contemporary price on the 
Bombay Stock Exchange.” the 
study said. It recommended liqui- 
dating j portfolio holding of a 
Euroissue company in the domestic 
market as soon as its offering was 
priced internationally, then buying 
the stock back several weeks later 
at a lower price. 

Vipul Dalai of the brokerage 
concern Dalai & Broacha said. 
“There is a general feeling that 
prices are manipulated higher just 
ahead of a Euroissue, but this may 
not happen in all issues. 1 ' 

Girish Desai of Prabhudas Lil- 
ladher Pvt_ another brokerage con- 
cern. said prices shot up ahead of a 
Euroissue because investors rushed 
to buy shares on expectations that 
the new capital would benefit the 
company. “Once the Euroissue is 
priced,” Mr. Desai said, “the buy- 
ing dies down for some time, and 
that's why prices fall, but in most 
cases they have recovered." 


inese Issues 

in Hong Kong Debut 


Bloomberg Busmen Xm 

HONG KONG — China's latest Hong Kong 
stock offering Monday gave a boost to the coun- 
try’s plans to sell more than a billion new shares 
overseas. 

Shares in the hydroelectric turbine maker Dong- 
fang Electrical Machinery rose 12 percent from the 


ered. Analysis said the stock was overpriced and 
overrated. ’ 

The case for Dongfang was more convincing. “It 
really is a good company operating in a good 
environment/’ said Scnja Jong a China analyst 
with Mees Pierson Securities ( Asia) Ltd. “It’s one 
of the three largest power equipment manufacture 


Indonesia 
Will Bar 
Investment 
In Media 


Hong Ktmg 

Hang Seng 
t3OO0~^~— ■ 

ii»prr 

■■tflM-Mhr 


v^ingapoire; • 
Straits Times 


fofcyb Vr J 


2*99 f*: 


m: 

>•2199- 





;■ im-4 


offering price of 2.83 Hong Kong dollars (3" U S. , . .. 

cents), finishing the dav at 3. 175 dollars. It was the . 


ers in China, and together they have 80 percent of 


cents), finishing the day at 3.175 dollars. It was the 
exchange's most active issue, with 53 million 
shares changing hands. 

Dongfang was the last in a pioneering group of 
nine Chinese state enterprises to sell shares in 
Hong Kong in the past 1 1 months. Analysts said it 
was a case of make or break with Dongfang. given 
China's plans to list 22 more slate firms in Hons 
Kong or New York over the net t few months. 

“The authorities in China want this stock to do 
well," said Steven Thompson, senior research ana- 
lyst at Nlkko Research Center. 

The first stock to be listed was Tsingtao Brew- 
ery. which jumped more than 25 percent above its 
issue price last July. The penultimate listing. Tian- 
jin Bohai Chemical, tumbled S.3 percent on its 
Hong Kong debut on May 17 and has not reccv- 


In a report published last month. Peregrine 
Brokerage estimated that China would spend S65 
billion on power projects before the turn of the 
century. "The power industry itself has more prior- 
ity than, say, the chemical industry and less com- 
petition.” said Dora Hung, China analyst with 

Goldman Sachs (Asia) Ltd. 

Dongfang has orders on its books through 1997 
and attracted the attention of foreign investors 
from the beginning, according to the company 
chairman. Yuan Changhe. ‘‘Today’s showing was 
roughly in line with our expectations.” he said. 

Dorigfang's 2.83 dollar issue price is equal to 
11.9 times projected 1944 earnings. The current 
average multiple for other H shares — special 
shares sold by Chinese state companies listed in 
Hon® Kong — is about 13.7. 


: Coles Myer Founders in Kmart’s Wake 


MELBOURNE — Shares in Australia's larg- 
est retailer. Coles Myer. sank to a three-year 
low Monday despite efforts to stem speculation 
that Kmart Cotp. will sell its stake, valued at 
more than 1 billion Australian dollars t US$738 
million). 

Analysts said investors were skeptical about 
statements that the U.S. group intended to 
retain its 21.26 percent share, the largest in 
Coles Myer. “These statements are not allaying 
the market’s fears." said Pierre Prentice, an 
analyst at the brokerage. BT Securities. 

The shares ended at 4.14 dollars, down 7 
cents from Friday’s close, after hitting 4.12 
dollars, their lowest level since March 1991. 
The Coles Myer share price has fallen 25 per- 
cent this vear. far more than the overall market. 


amid weak retail sales, the loss of key managers 
and problems in its department stores. 

Over the past month the main factor depress- 
ing shares has been the possibility of Kmart, the 
second- largest retail group in the United States, 
selling its stake to free up funds for a store 
refurbishment program, analysts said. 

Speculation about a possible sale increased 
after Kman’s annual meeting Friday, at which 
shareholders rejected plans for a partial float of 
four of the company's speciality chains. 

In its second statement in less than a week. 
Kmart said the defeat of the float proposal had 
no bearing on its shareholding in Coles Myer 
and repeated that talk of a sale was incorrect 
and unfounded. 


Coles Myer stake was “probably of limited 
strategic value." 

David Perry, research director at Ausiock 
Brokers, said Investors were ignoring Lhe deni- 


Compded by Our Staff Fnm Dnpadta 

JAKARTA — Indonesia said 
Monday it would not allow foreign 
investment in its media despite a 
new deregulation package that 
opens previously restricted areas, 
includin g the communications in- 
dustry. 

Infor ma tion Minister Hannoko 
said President Suharto had con- 
firmed that the new regulations 
would be overruled by earlier press 
laws that say the media must be 
owned and managed by Indonesian 
citizens. 

“Any foreign investment must 
be approved by the president,” he 
said. 

Despite allowing several private- 
ly owned television stations to go 
on the air in recent years, Indonesia 
keep a relatively light grip on its 
media. 

Indonesia last week cm veiled a 
package of refrains significantly 
easing foreign investment curbs 
and ending compulsory equity di- 
vestment for joint ventures. It also 
opened up strategic areas such as 
ports, telecommunications, power, 
railways, civil aviation and nuclear 
power. 

The investment deregulation was 


1994 • • • 


2® XT M amJ 

'•.'•1994 v. ' ••• • 




Exchange 


9,3 83-83 && > : 

“ 2 J 271 St Z26Z3& •;*$#' 

~ 1&72S£5 : 2Q&5&2&, v? 5j£ : 

97 ©. 0 <f 
r 1,383:01 
~ Closed 

6 , 077 - 25 : . '- 6 , 03 9 .SS 




HongKong 
Singap ore,. 
Sydney X, 
Tokyo. 


HangSerig / 
•St affs Times 
Afl QrdinBriy 
NStirei225 


. Kuala Lumpur . Composite 


B angkok .; 
Se oul •,...• . 
Taipei : : X 

Manila X 

Ja karta’ T 
Ne w Zeafand 

.Bombay • '■... 


SET 

composi te Stock 

Wei ghted Price^ 

ps£ ... : " 7 ” 


Stock Index 
"NZSB40 ‘ ' =7 

"Ktetfcoal Index* 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 


. 48853 '. ;•• * 

dosed, 

: : 7,95534- 

InKnunosaF BeraH Tri&ar 


Very briefly: 


• China’s domestic airline industry moved 15 J million peMleiin.ihe/irst 
five months of the year, up 192 percent from the same I993penod. Laq 
year was the worst for safety in China's aviation histray, howeswr.- with 
five crashes that killed more than 380 people. .. - ; - - ‘ ; V - 


als because the sale of the Coles Myer stake was made by government decree, which 


But Mr. Premice said Kmart would have to 
look at ways to raise funds, adding that the 


an obvious option for Kmart. was subordinate to the law, Mr. 

He said Coles Myer shares bad been under- Hannoko said, and the 1966 press 
performing the Australian market for some law barred foreign capital from In- 
time despite efforts by the company to improve donesia’s mass media, 
its image and profit. He also said the departure Mr. Hannoko, along with the 
of Coles Myers supermarkets chief. Brian government-sponsored Indonesian 
Beattie, last month was a big loss, adding that Journalists' Association and the 
the shares would remain under pressure until Association of Newspapers Pub- 
sales went up. Ushers, had criticized the new in- 

Another retail analyst said Lbere was no cer- vestment ru ^ es - 
taintv that Kmart would not unload Coles Such a move would endanger the 
Myer. “It's always going to be in back of role of the country’s press in safe- 
people's minds while Kmart continues to strug- guarding national interests, they 
g!e." the analvst said. argued. (Reuiers, AFP ) 


• Hong Kong's Executive Council will bear tins week from a government 
Ipdf force proposing measures to cool the. property market. - 


• Papua New Guinea placed a freeze on new mining arkL petroleum 
prefects until legislation governing resource development has bent 're- 
viewed. Shares of some Australian mining companies fell as a result.- 


lishers. had criticized die new in- 
vestment rules. 

Such a move would endanger die 
role of the country's press in safe- 
guarding national interests, they 
argued (Reuters, AFP) 


• Vietnam’s government has approved a $900 tmllioa joint venture.. with 

Japan’s Tredia Investment Co- to build the country^ largest dseprWater 
port at the village of Ben Dinh in the south. . ." 

• Kumagai Gam Co. won an 8 billion yen ( S80 million) order jointly with 
Tarmac PLC from Hong Kong's Mass Transit Railway Corp. io binId a 
tunnel for the new airport. 


• The Japan Automobile Importers Association said Saks of imported 
motor vehicles jumped 48 percent from a year earlier to 21.579 unit* m 
May, buoyed bv strong sales of U.S. care. - - .... X 

• . jff. Reum 


Fosters’ Sets Up 4 Divisions 


Claims and Dlsvltts l 
Against the j 


Unito) States 
Govem.nmevt 


PACE AND ROSE 

*TTV?HHET>S *ND COUNS£L.OI»5 


WASHINGTON D C 
-75J693 


PAPiS 

OJI XU 13 41 


LOS *N«3EL£S 
■ as*e<i 


Compiled bv iJvr Staff From Dupaiches 

MELBOURNE — Fosters’ Brewing Group Lid. said Monday ii would 
reorganize parts of die company into four geographically based brewing 
divisions. 

Under the reorganization, the company, said Nuncd’Aquino. formerly 
director of operations at its Carlton & United Brewing Lid. operating 
arm, would become chief operating officer with responsibility for brew- 
ing operations in Australia. New- Zealand and Fiji and for global export 
operations. 

A separate 3rm. Fosters’ Asia, has been created to focus on Asian 
markets, it said. The North American arm will be under Molson Cos. and 
the European division under Courage Group Lid. 

The company also said it would announce "important new develop- 
ments" soon regarding China. It did not elaborate. ( Reuter\ . AFX) 


Asian Nations Must Liberalize Interest Rates , ADB Says 


Compiled h- Our Staff Fron: Dupaiehei 


SINGAPORE — Asian countries need to 
liberalize interest rates to help meet the mas- 
sive funding needs of infrastructure develop- 
ment. a senior .Asian Development Bank offi- 
cial said Mondav. 


funding needs, estimated at SI trillion by the 
vear 2000. 


liberalized,” be said in a keynote address at the 
start of a two-dav investment conference. 


Gunther Shulz. the bank's vice president 
for finance and administration, said internal 
funding, especially through bond markets, 
was the solution to .Asia's infrastructural 


"Bond financing is very suitable for long- 
term infrastructure funding since it provides 
capital at market-driven fixed interest rates. 
Bank loons are typically too short and expen- 
sive.” Mr. Shulz said. 

“However, to make capital markets work 
efficiently, monetary policies need to recognize 
a free interplay of supply and demand, and 
interest rate policies, therefore, need to be 


Mr. Shulz said an estimated S600 million to 
$700 milli on in savings could be tapped 
through the capital markets, a large part of 
that through bond markets. 


He also said the insurance industry should 
use its position as a big investor of long-term 
savings to help Asian nations fund their in- 
frastructure projects. (AFP, Reuiers) 


Agence Franee-Fraxe . 

KUALA LUMPUR.— Malaysia 
and Singapore are to use their pow- 
erful state investment agencies to 
jointly undertake' projects in the 
region, officials said Monday after 
a meeting of finance ministers. 

Richard Hu. Singapore's finance 
minister, said joint vent ur es, espe- 
cially in Vietnam, rhina and Indo- 
nesia, would increase, and Malay- 
sia formally launched a holding 
company, Khazanah Holdings, to 
replace the current government in- 
vestment unit. 


The International Herald Tribune 
salutes the American Center, 
home to American arts and culture 
since 1931, on the occasion of 
its reopening in its new building 
designed by Frank O. Gehry, FA1A 
at 51 rue de Bercy, in Paris’ 12th 
arrondissemeiit. 


LECTURES 



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Call FutureSource Tel.: 444 71-867 8867 Fax: +44 71-431 3042 


Duff Forecasts and Market Myths for 1994 

Ttie US dollar will soar, donation will conllnue; gold S most commodillcs 
won t rise: Japan s economy & stock markol will be weak. Vcu did 
NOT read lhal In F ■ llerMoney - the Iconoclastic Investment letter. 

Cell kyia Phriips lor a torrpl© : »uo (or.co only) al Chc.i Ana y ltd 
7 Swallow Sl-oel, londan. V/lfl 7tt0. Uk Tel london 71 -il? il.Sl 
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Paris invmktv: 

‘Grid New York"- Garth Fagan Dance 

Miui icbifWy n/o n Mu r*a l is 
Climvoyraphy mid concept bij Garth Fagan 
Sets by Martin Pur year 


Youth Culture International 

Five round-table discussions trill explore 
the origins and impact of international 
"youth cullnn " today. 

June X. 11. Vi, 3-5 and IP 


t 


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Three Africa n -America n griot.s or 
storytell eiy collaborate on this ebullient 
evening of dance conceived to capture 

the youthful energy, grift iness and 
enchantment associated icith Xeiv Ynrk City. 
Ju ne !K UK ll at $:-30 pm 
June Utxt 4 pm 


“Out of Season”- David Dorfman Dance 

Find need in association with “ Dancing in 
the Streets." 

The David Dorfman Dance company 
pei for ms nil h 1-i non -/irofess it mat at h lefes 
fiv m the Pa ris co mmun it y. 

June J.»’, J.J. J-> at x.-.iO pm 
June Jti at 4 pm 


Pure Beauty: Some Recent Work from 
Los Angeles 

A near genemtion of Los Angeles-based 
artists - Richard Hawkins, T. Kelly Mason, 
Joige Pardo. Sarah Seag*.r, Thaddeus Shxide, 
Diana Thaterand Pae While - present 
site-specific works in a variety of mediums. 
June x - August 13 


-ML 


Margined Foreign 
Exchange Trading 


MEMBER SFA 


F.im. Competitive Quotes 24 Hours 
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FINANCIAL TBADEBS.LTO- 
280 Oser Avenue 


of the market latter of your Hauppauge, NY 11788, USA 


Tel.: 516-435-4800 
Fax: 516-435-4897 


Tickets can be purchased at the 
American Center bo.e office. 


Bill Viola: Stations 

A new video installation of fiiv channels 
of color video projection and sound focuses 
on images of the human body submerged 
underwater. 

June s - December 1 


For further details on bow to place your listing contact. PATRICK FALCONER in London 
TeL: (44) 71 836 48 02 —Fax: (44) 71 240 2254 

2icralb,^^.Sribunc. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


BEGRAVIA 


For reservations and information call 
Li ?J 77 00. 


This Body, This Soul, This Brick, 

These Tears: Disorder Today 

Four programs of recent short film and 
video works focus on disorder affecting the 
body, the soul and structural systems. 
Leslie Thornton and Gregg Bordowitz will 
also present l heir work. 

June s - June 25 


Nam June Paik: David & Marat 

Paiks tie a video sculptures combine his 
long-time fascination with the human 
form and technology, and were inspired by 
Jm yves Louis Davi d 5# pa inti ng, Ma rat 
assassine f'The DeaLh of Marat. 17 !U). 

They are on vuirfor the first time in Paris 
at the American Center. 

June x - Dccm/her l 


(Continued From Page 11) 


ORCHIDS 


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The opening exhibitions are part of 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE T, 1994 


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d HwrtepeCtaGrowttiFoLMl 
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d FfarronOslem lnc_ 
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iv Emeralng Muriels Fo_ 
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d Kontomerika me . 
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ur vrarM Bona Find Ecu 

NICHOLAS-APP LEGATE CAPITAL MGT 

to NA Flex [Me Growth Fd 5 1406! 

to NA Hedge Fund— —1 132.95 


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d Nomura Jokorto Fur vl - i 
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21 Granenor 5U4n WIN 9 FE46-71-49* 2998 


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151 J. 
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toOh-mpJo Security SF _4F 

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0 orallex Growth Fd. 5 

0 Ortvter Heotm A Em# Fa j> 
d OrtJltra Japan Small COP Fdl 

a Oridtax Nahiroi Res Fd CS 

FACTUAL 

d EieraRY Fund Lia s 

0 Inf Intlv Fund Ltd S 

d Star Hlgb Yleta Fa Lla 5 

PARIBAS-GROUP 
toLtPDT. 


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toSF Ea-OGaM Mines S 

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to SF Start Term T Eur. Era 

SOOITlC ASSET MANAGEMENT IRC. 
to SAM Brazil 


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197 
142 
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170 

1272 

773 

147 
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1737 
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ir UBAM DEM BonB_— __ rui 
w UBAM Emerging Growth . 
to UBAM FRF Band. 

to UBAM Germany. . 

» ubam Global Bona. 

to UBAM Ja 

iv UBAM Sttrtino Band. 

to UBAM Sib PocNB Asia. 

to UBAM US Equities 

UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND/IHTRAC 


to Korea Dynamic Fund S 

to Korea Growth Trust s 

to La Fayette HoMfoes LML— s 
b La Fayeta Rgpiiior Growths 
mLaJoile hit Grin Fd Ltd I 

b Latorman: OHstare Shat -3 

toLBaf SkCTV 

mLAu Performance I 

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m London Portfolio Servicax_s 

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m La* inn (Hot Fd lm- , t 
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mMcGtanb Global (Mar 311 -3 
aiMCM lnt. Umlted- 


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d Esdcc 

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a Itoc— 


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fllNSP F.I 


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m Ocean »rateglei Limited— S 

w Did Ironside InttLhJ S 

mOmem Overseas Partners .S 

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m Optfanum Fund — -* 

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d Sima 

aswtecreol. 


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ir SAM Diversified 

to SAM/McGorr Hedge - 

w SAM Opportunity 

to SAM Oracle. 


to Sam st rmegy- 

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toGSAMComPoriie- 


16532 

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10*49 

12246 

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SR GLOBAL FUND LTD 

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mSR Aslan. 


mSR International S 

SVENSKA HANDELS BANKEN 5JL 
M* Ba de to Pe bu sse. L-23M umetnbomo 


HH37 

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d ParveSI US* fl 

d Parvesi jopm a 

a Porvest Asm Poofe - 

a Parvesi Europe b 

a Parvesi Hdtond B 

0 Parvesi France B 

d Parvesi Getmony B — 
d Parvesi OMLOoUarB. 

a Harvest OWFOM B 

d Parvesi omt-Yen B_ 
d Parvesi OblFGutden B. 
d Parvest Obd-Franc 
a Parvesi OOlFSter B. 
d Parvesi oaiFera B _ 
a PBrvest ObU-Briu* a 
d Parvesi S-T Dahcr B 
d Parvest S-T Europe f 
a Pa rv u t s-t dem a 

0 Parvesi S-T FRF B 

0 Porvest S-T Ori Plus 0. 
a Porvest Global 
0 Parvest lnt Bond B 

a Porvesl OtHFLIro B 

rf Porvest Int Equities B- 

rf Porvest UK B. 

d Porvest USD phs B — 
rf Porvest S-T CHF B. 


-PI 

-FF 

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LS0 

2X87 

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a Porvest OWk-Cmodo B C* 

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PERMAL GROUP 
/ Prokkar Growth N.V 
/ emerging Mkn 

t EuroMlr (Ecu) LM 

I FK. Flnonclals L Futures _S 

/ investment hots n.v 3 

/ Media LCommunlcaftons—S 

f Noam Ud s 

PICTET A CIE-BROUP 
to P.CF UK VBI (Lm). 


cu 


to P.CF Genoavai (Luni — _dm 

to PX.F Ncra m val iLuy) 3 

to P.CF l/ollber lUol Prcc. 

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w PX.F Vortronce < Lu»>_ FF 

to P.U.F. Vdtaand SFR (Lw*) -SF 
toP.U.F. Vol bond USD (Lull -3 
to P.U.F. Votbond ECU (Lux) -ECU 
to P.U.F. Vpfbond FRF (Lu*)-FF 
toP.U.F Vaibond GBP Haul J 
toP.U.F. Valhona DEM (Luv) OM 

to P.U.F. USS Ba PH1 1 Lull! S 

to P.U F. Model Fd Era 

to P.UJ. Picllfe SF 

ir P.U.T. Emery Mkts ILus)_S 

w P.U.T. Eur. Qtaaft (Luxl Ecu 

0 P.U.T. Gtabol Value ILim)_Ecu 

* P.U.T. Euroval I Uni Ecu 

d PICtH Votsufiw (CHI SF 

m mil Small Cap HOM) S 


11X43 

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to Svensu Sri Fd Intt Bd Sb J 

ir SvcfBfca Sel. Fd Intt Sh s 

y> Sweroko Set. Fd Jason. — . — Y 
iv Svenska Set. Fd MHHWkt _5ek 

wSvansko SeL FdNonUe SEK 

w Svensko Set. Fd Pocti Sh — S 
to Svenska SeL Fd Swcd Bds_$ek 
to Svenska Sri Fd Sylvia Sh—Eco 
SWISS BANK CORP. 
d SBC 180 Index Fund SF 

rf SBC Equity Pftl- Austral la_A» 

0 SBC Equity PtfKtando — CS 

rf SBC Equity Pffi-Europe Ecu 

a SBC Eg Pm-Neftartonda — Fl 

0 SBC Govern Bd A/B ] _S 

a SBC Bond Ptfl-Auar S A__A* 

a SBC Bond PH I- Austr SB AS 

rf SBC Bond Plll-CaaJS A CS 

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0 SBC Bond PtfFOM A DM 

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0 SBC Bond Ptn-oinch G. fl_R 

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a SBC Bond Ptfl-Ecu B— £ai 

d SBC Band PMV-FF A FF 

0 SBC Bond Ptfl-FFB FF 

d SBC Bond PHFPtas A/B — Pt» 
a SBC Bond p rtf- Sterling A -6 
rf SBC Bond PTft-Sterifng B_l 

d SBC Bond PortioUfr-SF A SF 

d SBC Bond Porifolto-SF B SF 

rf SBC Bond PHLU5S A S 

rf SBC Bond PtfLUSSB S 

d SBC Bond PtS-YWA, Y 

d SBC Bond Pin-YtaB Y 

a SBC MMF - Ml- — AS 


5621 

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11475 

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21160 
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a UBS Amertai Latina s 

rf UBS Asia New Horton. SF 

0 UBS Aria New Horizon J 

0 UBS Smog C Europe SF 

0 UBS Small C. Euraoe DM 

a UBS Port Inv SFR inc. SF 

d UBS Port Inv SFR Coo G — 5F 

rf UBS Part lov Era inc SF 

0 UBS Pari inv Era Inc . .Era 

d UBS Pori Inv Ecu Cop G SF 

d UBS Poo inv Ecu Coo G — Era 
a ubs pen inr ua me — _S 

a UBS Port inv USS me SF 

rf UBS Port Irrv l/SS Coo G SF 

d UBS Port Inv USS OOP G S 

a UBS Port inv DM Inc SF 

d UBS Port Inv DM Inc DM 

a UBS Port Inv DM Cap G__SF 
rf UBS Fort Inv DM Cop G_J3M 

a Ym-inveri _Y 

rf UBS MM Inveri-USS. _S 

rf UBS MM Invest -LSI i 

a UBS MM InvtHcii, 
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rf UBSA6M Irrvesf-FF. 

0 UBS 68M iDvest-HFL 

aUBSMMinvori-Cant CS 

a UBS MM Inveri-BFR BF 

rf UBS Start Term inv-OM dm 

a UBS Bond hw-Ecu A- .Era 

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a UBS Bona Ntv-DM DM 

d UBS Ban) taeUSS S 


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m Parti RIM Oon BVI Mov 305 
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mPAN i n tgi n o U o n ot Ltd i 

to Poncurrl inc $ 

w Pmela Fund Pic 8 

ffl Panotaes OHstaro (Anr 30) S 

ro Paragon Fund Limited S 

mPoratlax FimdLki— — S 

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to Pnarma/WheaHh S 

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m Portuguese Smotter «Ji S 

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0 UBS Bond In*-Can t — CS 

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a UBS ttl-USS Extra Yield S 

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a UBS Fix Tenti Inv-tStta c 

0 UBS Fix Term fn*SFR96-SF 
a UBS Fbt Term inv-OM 96—DM 
a UBS Fix Term lav-Ecu 96_Eeu 
a UBS Fl* Term mv-FF *6 — FF 

0 UBS Bq U tto Cu rop t A DM 

a UBS Eq Inv- Europe T DM 

a UBS Eq inv-S Con USA S 

0 UBS Port I Fix Inc (SFR)-JSF 
0 UBS Port I Fh Joe (DM)— DM 
0 UBS Port l Fix inc C Ecul—Eoi 
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WORLD POLIO MUTUAL FUNDS 
asDody Income S 


a DM Doily tnceme. 
0 S Bond Income— — 

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d Gtabol Bonds- 


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d SBC MMF - Con5 CS 

a S0C DM Start-Term A DM 

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rf SBC 6AMF - Dutch G. Fl 

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57. 

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d Hoturni Resources 


0 SBC MMF -Esc 

0 SBC MMF - FF____ 

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a SBC MMF - Plus 

a SBCMMF-SaiHiine- 
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177169 
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toAcricrofssfflice Sicav- 

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mAovancerf Latin F0 U0_ 
m AdwmceO Pacific Strm_ 
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toAlGTaftoOh Fond. 


PREMIER INVESTMENT FUNDS LTD 
Gta P.aaox 1 1 OX Grand Cayman 
Fat: 1809) 9 *9 *199 3 

ffl Premier US Equity Funo_S 117X9* 

rt) Premier InW Eq Fund 5 134*57 

ffl Premier sovereign Bd Fd—S 01US 

m Premier Global BdFd S 147238 

m Premier Total Refurn Ffl— S 985 W 

PUTNAM 

a EmertfnaHHhScTrut*— S 37.17 

iv Putnam Em. info. Sc. Trusts 3X3* 

rf Putnom Gleb. Hlgn Growths 1x91 

a PwnomHion incGNMA Fas 82? 

0 Puinom Intt Fuid S 1544 

QUANTUM GROUP OF FUNDS 

to Aslan Development 1 10 121 

to Emerging Growth fo N.V_J 18*71 

to Quantum Fund N.V S 1*741.77 

vOumtvm indictrtgi— s HOT? 

to Qwyitum Realty Trust s 11440 

w Quantum UK Reotrv Fund -I 102*0 

toQwngr IrtttFutiON.V s 1477* 

« Quota Funa KV i i*K 14 

QUARRY MANAGEMENT LTD 
Teteotane : 109 - 949O&0 
Foaimiie : 809 ■ 94M8&; 

d Atlas ArbUtow Fd LM 5 n T> 

a Hesserri Fund Lla. j loan 

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d SBC GtbFPtH SF Grth__5F 

rf SBC GUU-Pttt Ecu Grth Era 

0 SBC GflU-Ptfl USD Grth S 

d SBC GlbFPtfl SF YMA SF 

0 SBC GW-Ptfl SF Yld B SF 

d SBC GlbMHfl Ecu Ytd A Ecu 

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a sac Gdu-ptfi uso vu a s 

0 SBC GW-Pttt USD Ykd B— JI 

0 SBC GlbFPtfl SF inc A SF 

a sbc Gnx-ptfi sf inc a sf 

a sbc GiN-pm Era Inc a -Ecu 

a SBC GM-Pffl Ecu inc B Ecu 

d SBC Gim-Ptfl USD Inc A— 4 

a sbc Gioi-pm usd incB__S 
a SBC Cm Plfl-DM Growth _DM 
0 SBC Glbl Ptfl-OM Yid B— DM 

a sbc Gtoi Ptn-DM inc b dm 

a SBC Emerata8Markefo_j 
rf SBC Smoti s Mid Com Sw-5F 

rf Aiwericnvnlar — s 

d AngtoVoior r 

a AjioPonioiiQ- 


rf Convert Bond Selection SF 

a D-Mark Bond Selection DM 

rf OaOar Band Selection— 
d Era Bond “iilrfflgq Tib 

0 Florin Bond Select kxi Fl 

rf Frtxice Vmnr . . FF 

d German tavd or_ 
rf Gotd Portfolio - 


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rf Sterling BradSeteciion. i 

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94* 

2897 68 

59903X00 

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w Aram Fund Btennrd sf 

to Aram Fond Bond — SP 

a Aria Oceania Fuad- 


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m Associated Invexfors lnt— J 

to Athena Fund Ltd S 

» ATO Nikkei Fund 3 

nr Banml Hedgtd Growth Fd 4 

IV Beckman let Cop Acc * 

to BEM In te r i ioII uiju I LW__— » 

tf BlkdbervMorval E£F Era 

0 Bfcanor Gltt Fd [Coymanis 
rf Bfrcmor G4ebol|B<8nnas) S 

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rf CCJJ t 

ffl cm Euro Leverage Fd Ltd** 
nt Capital Assured India Fd—S 
d C&GtmUm tndn Furxi— DM 
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It CM USA l 

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fflCoiunbus HokBngs S 

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toCanthwri Arttan} loh BF 

w ConttveslObil Betas CT BF 

to CftWretCMi world dm 

to Convert. Fd Inri A Cenx— 5 

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ffl Grata Drill Cap S 

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55749 
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to Smith Barney Writed Specs 
w SP international SA A Sh —s 
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w stsfeiharai Realty Trori s 

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d Sunset Globe* One S 

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w Techno Growth Fond SF 

d Tbmpfofon Gtabal inc s 

m The Brtdoe Fund N.v. I 

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ffl The J Fund B.V.L LM s 

to The Jaguar Fund N.V. 8 

d The M-A*R-$ Fd Storv A— A 
rf Tlta M-A*R*5 Fd Stow L_J3M 

m The Seychelles Fd Ltd. -5 

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m The Smart Bond Ltd — _ — S 
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to uni Band Fund Era 

w Uni CaalM ABamoipie — _dm 
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muniirades CHF SF 

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3y Jacques Nefaer 


P A R1S — Nudged by government 
incentives to buy new cars, 
French consumers are leading 
the country out of its worst reces- 
sion in the postwar period. 

Economists say the stimulus package, 
which is likely to be supplemented by tax 
cuts this fail, will ensure that France re- 
mains on the recovery road into next year, 
when the country should outperform Eu- 
rope as a whole and register growth of 2.5 
percent to 3 percent. With unemployment 
stabilized, they add. the recovery should 
give a political boost to Prime Minister 
Edouard Bahadur, who is widely expected 
to run for the presidency next spring. 

But lurking behind the giveaways, the 

experts add. will be a necessary c lamp- 

down after the election, as the new govern- 
ment is faced with a bloated budget deficit 
far surpassing targets required for Europe- 
an monetary union by 1007. 

After a 1 percent drop in gross domestic 
product in 1 993. France this year is clearly 
on the rebound. The government-funded 
economic research office, insee, in May 
revised upward its growth estimate, pre- 
dicting first-half output would advance by 
0.9 percent, and Edmond Alphandery. the 
finance minister, said it was “very likely" 
that the government would adjust upward 
its full-year estimate of 1.4 percent growth. 

"The French economy has embarked on 
the road to recovery.” Insee said. laying its 


prediction to companies rebuilding their 
stocks in anticipation of greater export 
activity and consumer demand. 

Indeed, April figures released recently 
showed that French consumers were be- 
ginning to show faith in a recovery after 
three years of economic crisis. Consump- 
tion of manufactured products rose 1.2 
percent in the month, following a 0.6 per- 
cent rise in March. 


would bring the total sales up lo about 
1.95 million’ cars. 


Mr. Alphandery called it an “encourag- 
ing” statistic, adding that consumer activi- 
ty “should be headed in the right direction 
in the months ahead." 


Economists say a good portion of the 
recovery can be attributed to the govern- 
ment's pump-priming measures intro- 
duced earlier this year. 


Critics say ihe incentives may be pro- 
ducing a false picture, suggesting that per- 
haps half of the sales being generated 
would have otherwise arrived on their own 
in later months. As a result, they say the 
industry may have to face another down- 
turn when the program ends. 

The government also gave a boost to the 
badly suffering building industry, accord- 
ing subsidized loans, particularly aimed at 
stimulating state-subsidized, low-income 
housing As a result, in the first four 
months, housing sums jumped 20 percent, 
to 103,200 units. There was a 25 percent 
increase in public housing projects, while 

individual housing starts rose almost 12 


“The economy got a large dose of govern- 
ment incentives in the auto and housing 
sectors,” said Brian M Lilian ey. chief inter- 
national economist at Morgan Stanley in 
London. “If the French economy advances 
1.5 percent this year, Fd say that a half- 

percem to three-quarters percent of that 
will be due to the incentives program." 

The government, since February, has 
granted 5,000 francs iS900i to anyone 
agreeing to junk their cars older than 10 
years and purchase a new model. With 
both Renault SA and Peugeot SA agreeing 
lo match the government bonus, new-car 
sales jumped nearly 14 percent in the first 
four months. Analysts now estimate that 
the measure, which is to re main in effect 
until next year, will generate additional 
sales of up to 250,000 cars in 1994. which 


percent. 

Tn the areas of office and commercial 
buildings, where there were no subsidies, 
the crisis has continued. The National 
Building federation said starts on new 
office buildings declined J S.S percent in 
the first four months. 


With some 540 billion francs socked away 
last year, mostly in life insurance and 
special savings accounts for housing, there 
was liltle cash left over for purchasing 
household goods. 

Meanwhile. French companies are re- 
building their stocks, depleted during the 
downturn. Factory utilization reached 
8 1.7 percent in April, up sharply from 79.4 
percent in the fourth quarter, and was 
expected to approach maximum levds of 
82.5 percent bv the end of the first half. 

At the same time, companies were start- 
ing to invest in modernizing their facilities, 
with spending on new- plant and equip- 
ment for expanded production believed 
right around" the comer. Business invest- 
ment which plummeted 15 percent in 
1993 and 30 percent over the past three 
years, was expected to grow by 4 percent 
ic value thin year and by 6 percent in 1995. 


cit and political risks.” said Mr. MuUaney 
of Morgan Stanlev. "I have concern about 
Bahadur’s tendency to give in to industrial 
actions." he said, referring to the govern- 
ment’s retreat over the past year against 
striking workers at Air France, students 
angry about a special lower wage for grad- 
uates undergoing training and fishermen 
protesting poor market conditions. 

Workers in the health care sector now- 
are be ginnin g to agitate about govenunen 1 
plans to introduce more flexibility in their 
working hours. 

Fears about a wider budget deficit — 
it’s already estimated for 1994 at close to 6 
percent of GDF —are being fueled by talk 
of further fiscal stimulation. The govern- 
ment recently floated the idea of tax cuts 
this fall for companies and perhaps house- 
holds as well. 


Vincent BazL economist with Baring 
Securities France SA. said the big question 
mark is whether consumers will continue 
ro spend, or rather retreat to their former 
savings mode for fear they will face unem- 
ployment With the jobless count mount- 
ing steadily last year — to over 5 J million 
people or 12.3 percent of the work force — 
French households increased their savings 
rate to 14.5 percent of their incomes this 
year, much higher than the 1 1 percent to 
12 percent savings rate in normal times. 


C OMPANIES, economists say. 
are generating good cash-flow 
and are in a position to invesL 
without having to borrow, as 
soon as they see the demand. 


“As (he campaign gets into full swing, 
the concern is that the government might 
be tempted to write an even bigga 1 check. 
Mr. Mullaney said. 


Economists believe corporate profits 
will leap this year — estimates range be- 
tween 20 percent and 40 percent — from 
the depressed levels of 1993. Despite the 
encour agin g numbers, market experts say 
the French economy is still not out of the 
woods, particularly with the presidential 
election season approaching. 

“I’m underwrighting the French market 
because of concerns about the budget defi- 


No matter who wins the Ely see, he said, 
new taxes and spending cuts would be 
required after the election to bring the 
deficit down. To meet the constraints set 
under the Maastricht treaty for monetary 
union, at the earliest in 1997. a member 
country’s annual deficit cannot exceed 3 
nercent of GDP. 


JACQUES yEBER is on the staff of the 
International Herald Tribune. 




Sources : Insee, Banque de France, CCFA, OECD. 


After Sell-Off ©: 


Is Likely in 


huernunonul Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — A year after seizing power, 
the conservatives have gone far on 
iheir promise to deliver France’s pub- 
lic sector into private hands, success- 
fully selling off some of the healthiest French 
companies. 

But now comes the hard part. With markets 
sagging, a presidential election around the cor- 
ner and more difficult assets to unload, the 
pace appears certain to slow as the govern- 
ment though needy of the proceeds to help 
offset a ballooning budget deficit takes pains 
to avoid any pre-election foul-ups. 

Even after the election — assuming one or 
anotherconservative candidate wins the ENsee 
— the privatization effort is not likely to" ad- 
vance any faster than the health of the compa- 
nies permits, and most of them look pretty 
sickly now. In addition, the giants in the non- 
competitive sector, such as the telephone mo- 
nopoly France Telecom, and national utilities 
Sectiicite dc France and Gaz de France, will 
likely remain off-limits for at least several more 
years because of political and social sensitiv- 
ities. political sources suggest. 

Since the program kicked off last fall the 


Treasury has cashed in state assets worth 9? 
billion francs ($16 billion), selling the state's 
controlling stakes to the public in the banks 
Credit Local de France and Banque National? 
de Paris, chemicals group Rhone- Poulenc SA. 
oil company Elf Aquitaine, and most recently, 
in the largesL French insurer. Union des Assur- 
ances de Paris. 

Edmond Alphandery in May claimed there 
“will not be a pause in the privatization pro- 
gram." but analysts suggest a slowdown will be 
inevitable, primarily because of a lack of com- 
panies in strong enough financial condition to 
attract investors. 

Assurances Generates de France, the insur- 
ance company, initially was seen as a sell-off 
candidate in the first half of the year, but now it 
is not likely to be put cm the block until fall, and 
even then, the drop in the market for insurance 
stocks could make the government think twice. 

During the privatization of UAP. the gov- 
ernment had faced critics who accused it of 
offering its shares at a “flea market price” — 
152 francs. The stock had traded at 223 francs 
last fall. Even at that price, investors were 
relatively restrained in their enthusiasm. The 
issue was oversubscribed 2.5 times, while the 


Rhone-Poulenc issue had an oversubscription 
of 4.5 limes ar.d BNP five limes. 

Tne UAP issue was particularly poorly re- 
ceived on Wall Street, which took up only 2.7 
percent of the share offer. 

The life insurance unh of the Caisse des 
Depots &. Consignations. Caisse NaiionaJe de 
Prevoyance. is also mentioned as a possible 
candidate for privatization this fall, but it faces 
the same problem as AGF. 

“CNP and AGF are viewed by the markets 
as not so interesting privatizations because 
interest rates will be rising, but the government 
may be forced to go ahead with them anyway 
for political reasons." said the head of ait 
American investment bank watching the scene. 
“If the program is interrupted now. it will be 
difficult to restart it before the election.” 

The wild card this fall may be Renault SA. 
one of Europe's healthiest carmakers, worth an 
estimated 40 billion to 50 billion francs. The 
government originally pledged to privatize the 
company before the end of this year, but then 
backed away from the pledge, suggesting that 
the issue would be made after the election next 
spring. 

Renault has historically been viewed as a 


“showcase" for organized labor in France, par- 
ticularly the Communis t-domina ted Confeder- 
ation Generale du Travail, which has shown 
itself hostile to privatization. Even though 
unions have been emasculated over the past 
decade of corporate restructuring, observers 
said the government didn't want to risk a 
worker revolt that could hinder the conserva- 
tives’ campaign. 


N evertheless, according to re- 
cent French newspaper reports, the 
government now is studying a low- 
profile partial privatization of the 
carmaker instead. The idea would be to piace 
15 percent tc* 25 percent of Renault's shares 
with a group of French industrial and institu- 
tional investors as a first step, with a public 
offer to follow next year, according to the 
report. Tne plan would permit AB Volvo to sell 
off some or all of the 20 percent it owns in 
Renault — a stake it pledged io abandon 
following the failure last December of the 
planned mercer between the Swedish and 
French carmakers. 

The government also hopes to unload 
Groupe Bull, its troubled computer company. 


Because of Bull's weak financial condition af- 
ter several vears of deep losses, the government 
will not maifp a public offer, but rather offer 
the state’s controlling stake directly to another 
company in the sector. NEC Corp. of Japan, 
which already has a small interest, is men- 
tioned as a possible buyer. 

The government may have to adept a similar 
strategy if it wants to part ways quickly with 
most other companies on its privatization list. 
In the most difficult position in the short term 
are .Air France, which lost nearly 8 billion 
francs last year, and Credit Lyonnais, which 
reported losses of almost 7 billion francs. But 
substantial losses also were reported by Afcro- 


spatiale. the aerospace group: Usinor Sacitor, 
tne sled company, Thomson SA, the electron- 
ics and defense company, and Snecma, the 
aircraft motors maker. 

While the privatization program has played 
an important role in raising money for the 
government’s recession-drained coffers, it also 
has helped advance the government's aim to 
instil] a “popular capitalism” in France, when 
the stock market has traditionally been viewed 
as a “casino" for professional investors only. 

According to a study by the Privatization 


Observatory, a group of marketmgand adver- 
tising agencies, the privatization pro gr auL up 
until UAP, had brought 25 nriflion newsnteil . 
investors to the stock marked, brin^ng theibud - 
to 7 million. The UAP sell-off was expected to 
attract around 800,000 more to 
However, a downturn in the. marke^cc^l . 
just as easily scare off many of tenew&oifis, * 
the study suggested, noting tbatmaay sail 
investors were unaware of the dangers ' 
ing the market “This apparent lack -of ccte^ 
sdousness about thestodc market gan^i^s:: 

myieac^ta priratiaxTstocks to fattbekS. 
their offer prices," it said . ’ . ’ \ '■ 

Fen those looking for a : :quidcpR^^ 
latest round of privatization* une fcdfesrgv. 
offer than the first wave, in 1 1986-lS®8, wljKt 7 
the stocks were first quoted at ari average- 6£18 
percent above their offer prices* Sp. far, ridy- 
BNFsseB-off Can. match that average' 
offered at 240 francsaMfiretqpo^m2835 < 
francs, an 18.1 percent gam. Upon first gtioie^ 
the shares of Crtdit Local de France gainaFK Y 
percent, RhBne-Poulenc 1 0.6 permit. Elf T2.; Y 
percent and UAP Z6 percent.^- - Y 

' JacquesNeber ^ 








i 


Business 

Investment 

Annua! rate 
' in percent 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 1994 

French Economy 


A Special 
Report 


A 'Traveling Salesman’ in 

Tordjman Spreads the W ord About France’s Improved Investment Climate 

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The unemployment office, are busy, left; a demonstration against a lower minimum wage for the young. 

Jobs May Hold Key to Presidential Race 


By Diana Geddes 


P ARIS — President Francois Miner' 
and came to power in 1981 promising 
to slash unemployment, which then 
stood at a record 1.7 million. By the 
lime the current conservative government 
swept into power 12 years later, the number of 
jobless had almost doubled to over 3 million, 
representing 10.7 percent of the work force — 
the highest unemployment rate of any of the 
workrs leading economic powers. 

Edouard .Bahadur determined to make no 


the. highest of any of the leading industrial 
nations. Its welfare system is one of the most 
generous in the worid." And its labor market is 
stiD one of the most restrictive despite some 
recent attempts to make it a little more flexible. 

There is a tremendous disincentive for em- 



it between now and the end of 

the year/ 

Even that has proved a vain hope. In April, 
the number out of work had gone op by a 
farther quarter of a million to 3.33 ntimon, or 
123 percent, and it is continuing to rise. Mr. 
BaBadur now modestly talks ofhoping to “re- 
verse the carve" by the end of the current year. 

This time his prediction has more of a 
chance of proving correct, though the experts 
remain cautious. There are increasing signs 
that tiie long-promised economic recovery is 
finally on the way after the worst recession in 
France since the end of World War IL 
‘ BotiTInsce, the official French statistical 
body, and the Eu r opean Commission have re- 
cently revised upward their estimates for French 
Gcoaaanognwth. After a fall is national output 
of 1 percent last year, Insee is now predicting a 
rise of OS percent in the first half of 1994 (up 
from its 03 percent forecast last December), 
while the European Commission is predi c tin g - 
growth of L6 percent for the whole of the 
current year (up from its original 1 percent 
estimate) and 2.8 percent next year, 


' is there an official min i m u m wage (cur- 
rently 5,866 francs a month — high for Eu- 
rope) but the employer also has to pay caip- 
p hng social welfare costs equivalent to 60 
percent of the worker's wage on top of that, 
and should business start to go badly, be win 
find laying off staff both difficult and costly. 

Over the past year, the government has in- 
troduced a whole series of measures aimed at 


Since 1973, France’s 
unemployment record has 
been the worst of any of 
the large OECD countries. 


M 




irf? 


‘'t!* „ 


Since the beginning of the year, the rise in' 
French unemployment has slowed tolas than 
5,000 k rt wiifi, compared with 30,000 a month 
when, the right came to power 1st year. And 
for the first time once 1990, more jobs are now 
being created than lost Figures tor the first 
quarter show a net increase of 20,000 jobs 





< 4 * 


to absorb the 
120,000. ur the 


tration sectors). 

.. Rut this is still not em 

expected natural increase 

working population ibis year. Bmeits esunate 
that an nmw iflT rise in GDP Of St JCSSt 23 
percent is needed before the number of -jobless 
will begin to fall, and France is not expected to 
achieve that Jewel of growth until! 995. 


Btaucvc mai jcvu ui , 

Since; the first ofl shock m 1973, Frances 
unemptoymesix record has been the worn of 
anyofthe large OECD countries. Its tax eur- 
. dec: — representing 44 perceotof GDP, com- 
pared with 30 percent in the United States — is 


workera, introducing more flexible working 
ham, and setting up a variety of on-thejob 

training schemes for the young. But the mea- 
sures have mostly been timid and havefaDed to 

tackle the nndaiymg structural causes of 
French lmengjlqymenL 
When carter this year the government did 
attempt to attack one of the “sacred cows’* c# 
the French labor market by prapooog jobs for 
lteyoung upemgdqygd at less thanthe official 
. minimum wajft it met with such a steam of 
protest, jaefarang a series of violent student 
.demcasstrations* that it promptly lacked down. 

Rd)ing cm ectmomk growth to create jobs is 
no longer good enough. A fundamartal ova- 
haul of the whale system is now needed. Yet 
every tune the government attempts to intro- 
duce even a modest reform, it finds its way 
blocked by social protests— or so it claims. 

In view of tins apparent “hsimesg," Philippe 
Sfcgujp , MO-GauDist president of the National 
Assembly, called in May for a referendum on 
jobs. The suggestion has been dismissed by most 
pofitkaans an both the right and the Jfeft as 
simply “demagogic," but it has attracted the 
stroll of Jacques Chirac; the neoGauffist 
leader. . . 

_ Mr. Chirac has hitherto paid public lip ser- 
yiceto Mr. BaHadPris gradualist approach on 
jobs. Now he appears to be seeking to tfistin- 
guMs hunsdr from his potential rival for the 
prcsjdetey by giving a more important place to 


the “social” treatmcni of unemployment. He 
has called for a “new social contract” between 
the government and workers. 

EANWHILE, the Socialists 
have returned to the idea of a cut 
m working horns as the best way 
, - to create new jobs. They are ad- 
vocating a reduction of the present’ 39-hour 
working week to 35 hours without loss of pay, 
with tte eventual aim of introducing a four- 
aay week. Although expats dismiss the idea as 
economic pie-in- the-sky, it has evident elector- 
al anneal. 


* ~ — j — u»u jufis over me coming 

months, unemployment is certain to be the 
biggest issue of the campaign. 

Although Mr. Bahadur has not vet said 
wtetter he will run for the presidency, he is 
showing every sign of wanting to. At present 
ra pollsccmtmue to shew him as the favorite. 
But he knows that he must get the unemploy- 
ment figures down before next April if he is io 
stand a chance of winning the contest. Mr. 
UmacB already breathing down his neck. 

strong pressure from certain govern- 
ment backbenchers for the adoption of a more 
raiatiomst economic policy (involving a big 
perease m government spending, a sharp cm 
“ 1 ? te8 A* “Option of the franc 

on the foreign-exchange markets), Mr. Balla- 
has itoafly stuck to his policy of mone- 
tary and budgetary rigor. 

To those hkc Mr. S & who have accused 
w mwermnent of faffing to give sufficient 


. wrenmoit of faffing to give sufficient 
pnonly to job creation, Mr. Bahadur tirelessly 
rqjrate that thou can be no durable progress 
on the jobs front without first creating a 
healthy economy. 

bathe run-up to the presidential election, he 
might have been tempted to offer juicy hand- 
outs to voters. Instead, he has already an- 
nounced plans to make further important cuts 
m governm ent Spalding next year with the aim 
“reducing the budget deficit by an exira 25 
buKon francs (S4.46 bfllion), and there is talk 
wsneiviiig promised income tax cuts of 20 
hunon francs until 1996. 

W 11 " !“* a*™)* said that his n- 
foms wffi uje time, that he has no “miracle 
5™5JPF S ’ Jbc way forward would be tough, 
heraid, and much effort would be required 
m>mi everyone. At first, this Churcfnilian. 
okxxi, sweat and tears" message appealed to 
an eketo rate ffisfllusioned with the unfulfilled 
johocal promises of the past. But their pa- 
tience is now beginning to wear thin. 


By Joseph Fitche tt 

P ARIS — Ensconced in the Finance 
Mrornty’-s Stalinian architecture, 
Jean Danid Tordjman qxirts a debo- 
nair silk necktie with an eye-catching 
motif of umbrellas. 5 

■ Pf”® 11 : *“ visitors, refere io "Sin- 

gm m the Rain," the classic musical corned v 
combining the perennial charms of France 
wiui American cszhJo verve. 

This ofttand way of mixing Hermes and 
Hollywood IS typical of Mr. Tordjman, a volu- 
ble, sophisticated official with a title as pon- 
derous as the building be works in: Ambassa- 
dorial Large, Special Representative of France 

for International Investment and head of the 
Invest-m-France mission. 

In practicc. Mr. Tordjman spends little time 
at hu desk and stays constantly on the road in 
teeUmted Slates. Aaa and Europe, working 
“racily with people there to facilitate thdr 
investments in France. 

A top-levd traveling salesman to the world's 
financial elite to get them to bny into France's 
rotur^ he also functions as a lobbyist inside the 
French system for attracting and keeping for- 
eign investment. 

It is an unusual job and France has filled it 
with a man of unusual qualities: at 50 with 
seven years’ experience as head of the econom- 
ic section of the French Embassy in Washing- 
tea, Mr. Tordjman is an insider in the elite 
ranla of the bureaucracy and a trade official 
with hands-on experience in the global compe- 
tition for cross-border investment. The fact 
that he accepted the job — after playing a kev 
irae m the mtermimsterial consultations that 
tea to its creation two years ago — testifies to 
his confidence that when France says it wants 
foreign investment, this time it means business. 

A fa , . . .ft « a 


«“"*«** people to get the word 
about the welcome mat that Mr. Tordjman 
carries m i his briefcase may well be some re- 
jfactoty departments in French government. 
Until recently, even when the government 
wanted a particular foreign investment, the 
vatmc could bog down in bureaucratic in- 
fighting between, say, the Industry Ministry's 
plans for nurturing subcontractors in one re- 
gion and another mmistiys politics of sending 
jobs to a more deciorally sensitive region. 

Conscious of this reputation for heavy- 
handed government as a damaging factor col- 
oring France’s investment climate. Mr. Tordj- 
man, before even attempting to woo new 
investors, started out by trying to mend fences 
with foreign companies already in France. 

. “Most future investment is going to come 
from existing investors as companies restruc- 
ture their international operations to meet the 
new economic rules of the game, especially in a 
single- market Europe where it is no longer 
politically essential to have a subsidiary in 
evoy nation,” he says. 

Thai means expanding some investments 
and dosing down others, and Mr. Tor^'man’s 
goal is to see that a corporation such as Inter- 
national Business Machines Coip-, which has 
facilities deliberately scattered through the Eu- 
ropean Union, concentrates its eggs in the 
French basket. 



No effort is spared. Last month, a handful of 

i-fund tr 


U.S. pension' 
$400 billi or 


— managers — controlling 

— ion that has to be invested somewhere 
— spent a week in Evian, the spa on Lake 
Geneva that has gained luster as a showplace 
of its owner, Antoine Riboud, who is al go the 
boss of France's top food mul tinati onal new 
just renamed Danone. 

The working sessions included a drumbeat 
of upbeat news about France, including the 
appetizing morsel that the Union des Banqucs 
Suisses ranks France at the top of the charts for 
retain on investment — a calculation in real 

dollar terms based on equities, bonds and cash 

m industrial countries. 

Mr. Tordjman also says that France offers 
rearonahly lower wages and higher productivi- 
ty than many of its European rivals. French 
manufacturing wage costs, estimated at $16.88 
an bom, are below those in Germany by more 
than $9. 


Li s tenin g to the complaints of foreign- 
OTmed businesses leads to trying to find reme- 
dies for thdr problems. 

For instance, a newly arrived J^ranese com- 
pany was shown one-time leniency on an im- 
port violation probably stemming from lack of 
familiarity with the French system. American 
companies in an entire service sector reported- 
ly got rebel from some costly a dminis trative 
requirements. A major European pharmaceuti- 
cals maker was helped to locate a new facility 
where it wanted, not where political expedien- 
cy dictated. 

To ait through the notorious red tape in 
Paris, the government now has only four weeks 
to challenge foreign investments of less than 50 
million francs ($9 million) before they are 
auto m atically authorized. Investors get resi- 
dence permits on arrival for one year while the 
normal administrative routine is completed. 

. F°r domestic consumption, French poh'ri- 
aans still molest loudly whenever foreign 
companies dose down facilities in France, 
complaining that other countries in the Euro- 
8,16 away jobs. In contrast, 
Mr. Tordjman is serene about the issue of 
disinvestment: “More of that traffic is coming 
our way than going away." 

He has grounds for being so bullish. Foreign 
mvKtment in France totaled $111 billion in 
1993, up from just $20 billion a little over a 
Browog at a rate of 
$10 billion to $11 billion a year over the oast 
Few years. 

France now ranks behind Britain and Ger- 
many m Europe as a reripieot of foreign invest- 


ment, a far better showing than in tte past, and 
evfflleaped to tte top spot in the sweepstakes 

That Frau* spurt owed a lot to the opening 
of EurO' Disney, the second-largest cons true - 
^project in Europe after the Channel Tun- 
nd 7he $4 billion entertainment pari: inciden- 
tally reinforced the long-held position of the 
United States as tte country with the largest 
stadc <rf investment in Frants, with Germany 
stul in second place despite its own domestic 
investment needs since reunification. 

For the foreseeable future. France seems to 
be profiting handsomely from its situation at 
the coua- of the comment. Britain has been 

? Japancsc while 
Francehas benefited from rising foreign acqui- 

{? “*23 % '£?!<*** “ighboni, notablyfta- 
*y and the Benelux countries. 

Mr. Tordjman describes his own approach 
ui th«» terms: “I don’t tell business what to 
ao: I listen and try to understand what busi- 
oess w ants to do and make sure that our 
administration does all in its power to help the 
companies succeed or fail — on thdr own." 

While protectionist reflexes remain strong in 
France, foreign ownership is officially seen as a 
spur to the overall economy and no longer as 
primarily a threat to France's home-devdoped 
businesses. 

The advantage is the creation of new jobs 
amid worsening unemployment. Foreign -owned 
investments typically are midsized companies — ■ 
fewer than 1.000 employees — offering faster 
job expansion than big corpora tions 

These foreign-own ed companies are now 
adding nearly 15,000 jobs a year to the work 
force, with U.S. investors accounting for more 
than one- third of the total, about as rmirh as all 
the other EU countries combined. 

Die foreign presence is particularly strong in 
the manufacturing sector, notably in food- 
processing, electronics and chemicals. Notable 
absentees — Japanese carmakers, defense con- 
tractors from any foreign country, U.S. tdevi- 
aon companies — elicit little comment from 
Mr. rordjman. Instead, he insists on what he 
says is the fundamental shift of French recog- 
nition that it cannot escape total involvement 
in a global marketplace. 

One factor in France’s need for an inflow of 
foreign capital is to offset the heavy outflow of 
franc investments over the last decade as major 
frach corporations expanded in the United 
States and otter foreign markets 

More important, Mr. Tordjman contends, 
France has accepted more competition in its 
domestic markets. “Can you imagine anythin g 
mare French than french fries? But a Canadian 
company, McCain, has started making frozen 
french fries in France and this year it is selling 
200 tons of them in this country and the rest of 
Europe." 


JOSEPH FITCHETT is on the staff of the 
International Herald Tribune. 


Gaz de France 
a company 
strong on 


(.az iff Frnui'r j« on** of fin- rorr im rural g«.K •-uuipmun. 
in flu* world it* offer :i «oiii|iivli*'ii.,rvc srr\ r»*r from die 
uripiuil Miiirir in ihr fiiuil i-uiiMimrr. h is alx* ut work 
[iriTiml j,.. border-., pn.vi.liiig irs experrisr in rJn- urea* 
of (rrhnieol roujir ration nnd 


industrial insinMniioiis. 


Il» engineering and 


partnershk). 



rooHilriu" n ii bsi diary, 
Sofregox. has over 30 years' experience in 
ilie development of gat. projeris. on an 
iuieniHiioitaJ settle. Called nu as hu 
industrial portlier in Cnnailn. the L'niied 
Smics and Germany. Gnx de France 
i's also h key player in u wide ntu°e 
•if projects for the irunsmissintt 
and distribution of gas in the CIS 
nnd elsewhere in Central Europe. 
Gaz de Era n re approm-lio each 
|imjrri with llir unique e\|irrinii»u> 
of its ptmnrrs in mind. And lirratisr 
iiitrrua tional development j* (l 
long-lrnii rnitiuiiiuiriii. 
Gust de Era ii re has 
now opened 


permanent 


offirrs in Mo Kiev. Budapest. 

Fragile. Bratislava. Berlin. Buenos 
Aires. Hotisioii anti Montreal. 



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Drop Ball 


The Associated Press 

This i$ why the Cincinnati Reds 
were so excited lo get Deion Sand- 
ers. 

Sanders bustled for a two-out 
double in the ninth inning, then 
scored the tying run on an infield 
single Sunday in a game the Reds 
eventually won, 9-6, in the 10th 
over the visiting New York Mets. 

“Scoring all lire way from second 
on a ball like that." said Lenny 
Harris, who got the tying hit. "we 


NL ROUNDUP 


were kind of laughing. We hadn’t 
seen anything like that in a long 
time.” 

Sanders is 9-for-27 with three 
stolen bases since the Reds got him 
Iasi Sunday in a trade that sent 
Roberto Kelly io Atlanta. 

The Mets took a 6-4 lead into the 
bottom of the ninth at Riverfront 
Stadium, and John Franco retired 
the First two batters. Brian Doreen 1 
singled, and Sandere followed with 
a hard grounder that deflected off 
Jose Vizcaino's glove at shortstop. 
Sanders streaked into second base 
when the Mets' center fielder, Ryan 
Thompson, tried to rush his throw 
and dropped the ball. 

Harris hit a slow grounder to- 
ward the hole that Vizcaino fielded, 
but his throw to first was late. Dor- 
sett scored on the single, and Sand- 
ers was determined to follow him. 

David Segui's throw home from 
first base beat Sanders, who 
stopped about 10 feet up the line. 
But the Met catcher, Todd Hund- 
ley, dropped the ball for an error, 
and Sanders vaulted over him for 
the tying run. 

“I’ was just doing what 1 bad to 
do to get home," Sanders said. 
"That was a good throw. I thought 
I was dead." 

In the Reds' 10th. Barry Larkin 



Did Tennis 



JiHentaBoml Herald Tribune 

PARIS - For Dine days, the ; women’s 
at the French Open amounted <o a mnonogny 
caucus. No one paid much attention as one 
anonvmous candidate after another tried 
thedarkhorse who would take on Steffi Graf, the 
world No. 1. , 

Mary Pierce muscled her way into the 
against Graf, and Graf was clobbered. Apan : from 
Pete Sampras's abortive attempt to win ‘®“Jr 
consecutive Grand Siam title, Pierre s breakthrou^t 
was the most memorable occasion of the tournament. 


IAN THOMSEN 


■ : : ‘ ■“ — ■ ■■ x I » “ r - - ‘ ■“ ' 


• t'.I-A 


.'***.*■ Sr-}. 


■ Y^J, • ; 

* * * * * • , * * 4 • v 4 / , . 4 . / ’ 

A*. . .M « • *T. ?. , JjiMi *•*' t \ . ... * - 

T l"ilnuc Tbc A.-vxui.'d Pxv. 

Deion Sanders diving over the Mets' catcher, Todd Hundiey, to score the tying run in die ninth. The Reds went to win, 9-6, in the 10th. 




singled with one out. and Bret 
Boone reached on Bobby Bonilla’s 
error at third base. Frank Seminars 
fO-2) made a wild pickoff throw to 
second base that moved up the run- 
ners, and Jerome Walton hit a drive 
that bounced off the lop of the left- 
field fence for his first homer in the 
majors since 1991. 

‘■Some losses are worse than oth- 
ers.” said the Mets' manager, Dal- 
las Green. This one ranks up (here 
pretty good.” 

Expos 10, Cubs 5: Freddie Bena- 
vides, pinch-hitting, tripled home 
the tie-breaking run in the 13th 
inning, and Montreal won its 
fourth in a row. Chicago has lost six 
straight, all at Wrigley Field. 

Randy Milligan doubled in the 
13th off Dave Otto; Benavides tri- 
pled for a 5-4 lead, and Mike Lan- 
sing doubled. With two outs. Sean 
Berry hit a three-run homer. 


The Cubs scored the Lying run in 
the ninth off John Wetteland. and 
both teams left the bases loaded in 
the 10th. Ryne Sandberg, who did 
not start a day af ter bruising his left 
knee in an outfield collision, 
grounded out to end the Chicago 
TOtiJ. 

Pirates 4, Rockies 3: Kc' in 
Young tripled borne the go-ahead 
run in the ninth innin g and Pitts- 
burgh won at Mile High Stadium. 

Jay Bell opened the ninth with a 
single off Marcus Moore, and 
Young followed with a short fly 
baJl lo left-center that split Colora- 
do's diving outfielders. 

Marlins 10, Padres 5: Jerry 
Browne hit a two-run double, and 
Benito Santiago had a threc-run 
homer in the seventh as Florida 
completed a three-game sweep of 


iptel 

San Diego. 


A. J. Sager walked Dave Maga- 
dan leading off ihe seventh, and 
Pedro MarJcez relieved. Chuck 
Carr reached when Martinez threw 
wide ic first on his sacrifice bunt, 
and Browne followed with a double 
down me left field line. 

earlier gj-wr. reported Mon- 
*i.v ,/.• s^rne c." the Herat J 

Tr.bims: 

Braves 6. Dodger* 5: Jeff Bbuser 
hit a two-cut. iwo-run double. cap- 
ping a four-run rally in the eighth 
inning at Atlanta. 

The Brave; are 6-0 against the 
Dodgers this season and 18-1 
agoin.,i NL W»t opponeris. Lc> 
Angeles has lew four in a row. 

Atlanta overcame a :-Z deficit in 
the eighth against Ai CLur.a. Dar- 
ren Drcifon and Todd Worrell. 
Mark Lernke had an RBI grounder 
and Dave Gallagher singled home a 


run before Blaoser doubled off 
Worrell. 

Giants 10. Cardinals 3: Pitcher 
Mark Portugal hit an RBI single 
during a six-run first innin g mat 
sent Sac Francisco past Su Louis 
and ended a five-game losing 
streak. 

Matt Williams hit his 20th homer 
for the Giants, who got a season- 
high 17 hits. They began the day 
batting 2139. lowest in the majors.' 

Portugal. Barry Bonds and Dar- 
ren Lewis each had three hits for 
visiting San Francisco. 

Astros 4, Phillies 2: Dam! Kile 
save up two runs in the first inning, 
then did not allow another before 
leaving after the eighth at the As- 
trodome. 

Kile allowed five hits and John 
Hudek. pitched the ninth for his 
eighth save. 


For Rangers’ Hitters, There’s No Place Like Fenway 


The Associated Press 
The Texas Rangers’ new home. The Ball- 

K ark In Arlington, has a 14-foot wall in left., 
iaybe they should raise it a few feeL 

Texas completed a weekend of using Fen- 
way Park’s 37-foot Green Monster as a tar- 
get on Sunday as Jose Canseco’s three-run 


AL ROUNDUP 


homer in the 11 ih inning gave the Rangers a 
10-7 victor/ and a sweep. 

“You’vegol to love it here," said Canseco, 
who hit four homers and drove in 10 runs in 
the three games. “You’ve got to love it if 
you’re a right-banded power hitter. This park 
is trueiy advantageous for a right-banded 
hitter." 

Canseco went !0-for-13 in the series and 
scored 1 0 runs. The Rangers collected 45 hits 
and outscored Boston, 33-13, to post their 
first sweep at Fenway since 1984. 

Will Clark, who hits behind Canseco in the 
cleanup spot, went 9-for-15 with eight RBIs. 

"It's really difficult to pitch to two hitters 
when you’ve got 3-4 hitters that are so darn 
hot,” Canseco said. 

Clark, who signed as a free agent in the 


offseason, adds another potent bat to a Tex- 
as lineup featuring Canseco. Juan Gonzalez 
and Dean Palmer. 

“That’s what I envisioned.” said the Rang- 
er manager. Kevin Kennedy. “I envisioned 
Will getting base hits with two out* to win 
ballgames. Jose is much more focused. He 
warns to be one or the premier players in 
baseball again, and I think he has shown 
•that.” 

In sweeping Boston, the Rangers complet- 
ed a six-game road trip at 5-1. 

Angels 3. Brewers 1; Joe Magrane pitched 
a four-hitter to help California slop visiting 
Milwaukee and snap a six-game losing 
streak. 

Magrane, who underwent elbow surgery in 
February and had averaged less than five 
innings in his first five starts, survived six 
walks by using off-speed pilches lo keep the 
Brewers off balance. 

Magrane carried a three-hit shutout into 
the ninth before Brian Harper hit a two-out 
RBI double. It was his first complete game 
since Aug. 28, 1990. 

Blue Jays 5, Mariners 4: In Seattle, Toron- 
to’s Devon White and Paul Molitor hit 
homers in the first inning to help Dave 
Stewart beat the Mariners for the 20ib time 
in his career. 


The Blue Jay* look a 3-0 lead on the 


Jay; 

me’s first eight pilches by Dave Fleming. 


Toronto, which took iwo of three from the 
Mariners, won their first road >eno this 
season. 

While went 4-for-5, and he hit Ids eighth 
homer on Fleming'-' >eoond pitch. 

Stewart improved io 20-c in his career 
against the Mariners, including 2-0 this sea- 
son. 

Indians 8, Athletics 1: .Albert Belle drove in 
four runs and Eddie Murray three as Cleve- 
land swept the A’s in Oak tana cMecd-d 
its winning streak to eight games. 

It was the 11th lime this soaron ’.i’v A> 
were swept in a series. They dropped to a 
major-league worst 16-39 ana are on pace to 
lose 117 games. 

Charles Nagy allowed one run and 10 hits 
in eight innings as the Indian* improved to 
16-3 against the AL Wck. 

Belle hit 2 rwo-rnr. single and h^d i»- * 
sacrifice Flies, and Murray" doubled, singled 
and had a sacrifice fly. giving him seven 
RBIs in his last two games. 

Ron Darling allowed 10 hits and eight 
tuns in three-plus innings. 

In earlier games, reported Monday in some 
editions of the Herald Tribune: 

Royals 3, Yankees 1: Kevin Appier com- 


bined with two relievers on a seven-hitter as 
Kansas City completed a Lhree-game sweep 
of the Yankees in New York. 

Appier struck out seven in 7 z s innings. 
Rtiaty Mcacham pitched the ninth for nis 
second rave. 

The Royals' sweep was their first in New 
York since 197S. 

Paul O’Neill went 2-for-4 and drove in die 
Yankees’ run with a single in the sixth. 

Jim Abbott threw 40 pitches in the first 
ir.ring when the Royals collected five Jut? 
and -.-.y-ed three iimc>. 

Orioles 8. White Sox 5: At Baltimore. Cai 
Ripken's P.51 single brought ui the go-ahead 
run in Baltimore’s four-run seventh inning. 

Leo Gomez. Rafael Palmeiro and Harold 
Baines homered off the White Sox’ starter. 
.Alex Fernandez, as Baltimore won for just 
the second lime in sever same*. 


Whether she is responding to the ^larger issue the 
rescue of women's tennis —probably cannot be deter- 
mined until next year. 

Wimbledon starts in three weeks, and Pierce, 19. 
will make her debut there with small ejq>ectai uon^ She 
plans to so to England in a few days and has entered 
the warm-up tournament at Eastbourne — id tne zi- 
and-nnder division. 

"This wil! be my second time playing on grass an di l 
isn’t very' easy for me to play on, Pierre exptemed. 
“So Td just rather play the 21-and-under event just w 
t-in.-t of get used to it and not have u really count as a 
tournament.” 

For her to reach the final rounds at Wimbledon 
would be a more sensational break through than her 
performance backed by the French fans at RoUum 
Garros. If not for the straight-set victory by no. - 
Arantxa Sanchez Vkario of Spain, No. 1- 
would have become the lowest-seeded womens Grand 
Slam titlist since the Open era began in 1968. 

Beyond the final emotional bid of Martina Navrati- 
lova, no one can be seen as a serious rival to Graf at 
Wimbledon — unless Graf turns out to beat herrelf. 
Unhappy with her play in the month preceding Ro- 
land Garros, Graf figures to return to her intense, 
focused roots after being kicked around by Pierre. 
Conversely, it is possible that she will not soon regain 
her confidence and will be susceptible to another 
dr ama tic upset. 

Since 1968. only two women seeded outside of the 
top four bad ever' won the French Open |No. 7 S&n- 
chez Vicario in 1989. and No. 5 Nancy Richey in 
1968). 

The opposite is true in the men’s game, what with 
No. 23 Alberto Bcrasategui of Spain reaching the final 
against his compatriot and the defending cnampion. 
Sergi Bruguera, who beat him in four sets. The emer- 
gence of Bcrasategui who hadn't lost a set before the 
final was not unprecedented — Mats Wilander of 
Sweden was unseeded when he won the French Open 
in 1982, and the unheralded Boris Becker broke 
through at Wimbledon in 1985. 

In an interview before the French Open, Graf pre- 
dicted that women’s tennis would never experience 
such upsets in the major events, saying that women 
lacked the power to dominate their opponents physi- 
cally. Even on her hottest day. said Graf, no underdog 
was' likely to serve a highly seeded opponent off of the 
court. 

If Pierce can sustain her recent advances, she could 
begin to change that assumption. Her coach, Nick 
Bollettieri. said that in his 37 years of tennis he had 


-rv nhver — including iris former.pa^j;. 
Surier anafcy 

Andre » A £iBeckcr — ^Ivii i he fcaltsc.*^- fnss&Hfc 

aspsffifss 

and Sfmchez Vicano said tiie power of 

Si t wSKttofc ' 1 

ajmetiimg! You are not top tte WlJ» : 

fact, you are rather stupid- U.K.. ; 

eSdytiwt way,” BoBettifli sakjyi ’ . 
can’t tdi her bow I fed as 3 coach, then 
the right job. The more she thinks, ihe more drfficufty r. 
we are Eoiug to have. So I said, ‘We are going vofietxm-- 
on the baseline and we are going to bit 
every bafl.’ And you know who is respoositwiof tnar' 
Mr. Pierce. He is the. man that made her ah trtct. y og 
have to. give credit td where the credit i $ d^rtswk;' v; 

Mary Pierce and her mother have 
Pierce, Mary’s father -and former coad^hMLabased 
them emotionally aod physically for yearn. JajEany 
ways, then, Kerce is. the perfect emblem. iri Hfcanrs's 
fitful bid to recast itself. The Women’s gamehas epme 

under much deserved aritirisni for making stiffs out of 



immature teenagers r .... - „ . - 

jnth after the arrest of Jennifer Capriati 


issue last month after the arrest ... . , . t . 
for marij uana possession — ; and PienX^ has bOHL- 
through that grinder, sobjected to a fwidiu widc^er-'- 
worked her and put her under severe pressures., 

And yet one would never know it to wateh tier jrfay 
this weekend. Perhaps there is a lot ^te isTaffinfc or 
with v/hich she hasn’t come to wasm^ 

opponents. She responded to the crowd, she latgheti. 
she headed the ball she almost seemed to dance; at 
times. In between those moments, the- way ^hs played . 
was smply dazzling. 

"Many people say that something is imsang hi 
tennis, that its less" exciting.’’ said Pierce, who wffl 
dimbtoNo.7 in the rankings next week, mating her 
the highest-ranked Frenchwoman ever. “Blit I feel that 
the public likes me — especially here m Paris.— and 
for the way I attack in my game.” | 

For a sport absolutely lacking in charisma, here fc a , 
woman of French heritage raked in America who 
speaks both languages. She can relate to both sides of 
me ocean. Indeed, with journalists from all over the - , 
world gathered at the French Opes, it is astonishing 
that site was not made available to the press for one- 
hour the morning after she overtook Graf; Tennis 
could have said, “Here is our new star, we’re proud of 
her, spread the word about her’’ — and every major 
newspaper in the world would have come out with 'a 
positive feature on the bright .future of womenY 
tennis. *■ 

For a game that is content lo a&ow.one 1 4-year-old 
after another sacrifice her youth on behalf ef sponsors, 
it is amazing how suiddally protective the game be^ . 
mtriK when one of those players actually amounts lid 
something positive. By the game's own choice, 
strangely enough, it is easier lo prepare an in-depth 
feature about Capriati’s downfall than it is to come up 
with the compelling facts of Pierce's rise. Ultimately, 
all the players suffer. It really is a callous sport. 




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ffifUNES 


fr^.t ? ^T ’Pt 


Sanchez Vicario’s Day-After Smash 


Reuters 


Julio Franco, vriih two RBIs for ihe W niw 
Sex. le’tds the majors with 58. 

Tigers 5, mins 3: Tony Phillips hit two 
homers, and Mike Moore pitched a six-hitter 
a-i Detroit beat visiting Minnesota. 

Phillips had his first career two-homer 
game, and Kirk Gibson also horaered for the 
Tigers, who were routed. 21-7. by the Twins 
on Saturday. 


BARCELONA — Arantxa 
Sanchez Vicario. the new wom- 
en’s French Open tennis champi- 
on. cr. Monday slammed her op- 
ponent. Mary Pierce, for 
arrogance before the final and 
said her victory had been a 
smack in the face for the French 
player. 

Sanchez Vicario, the world 
No. 2. won her second French 
litis- -irith a 6-4 o-4 triumph Sun- 
day over the I2ih-ranked Pierce, 
who had delighted the Paris 
crowd by upsetting the reigning 
champion. Steffi Graf of Germa- 
ny. in the semifinals. 

"When she beat Steffi she 


seemed to think that she had it 
sewn up but she had one more 


match to play to be champion 
Vicari 


Sanchez Vicario said upon re- 
turning home to Spain on Mon- 
day. 

"My victory gave Mary Pierce 
a smack in the face and now she 
should have a bit more respect 
for her opponents," the Spaniard 
added. 

Sinchez Vicario said both 
Pierce and the French press had 
seemed to think victory in the 
final was a foregone conclusion 
after Pierce’s demolition of op- 
ponents in the early rounds and 
her stunning defeat of Graf, the 
world’s top-ranked women’s 
player. 


“After all she said, l think all 
she achieved was to put pressure 
on herself.” Sanchez Vicano 
said. “When she gels to be world 
No. 1 she can taBL" 

Journalists outnumbered 
spectators in a surprisingly low- 
key welcome for Sanchez Vicario 
at the Barcelona airport. 

Sanchez Vicario refused to be 
disappointed, however. 

“It's normaL" she said. “Mon- 
day is a bad day for receiving 
champions." 

Sergi Bruguera, (he men's 
champion, and Alberto Berasa- 
tegui, his opponent in the final, 
were due back in Spain later . 
Monday. 


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DENNIS THE MENACE 


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CALVIN AND HOBBES 



MET, CHARLIE BROWN, 

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IN OUR BACKYARD.' 



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SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. JUNE 7, 1994 


The nba Finals on TV 1 Ewing’s Gigantic Jam Sends Knicks to NBA Finals 

Pacers Come Up Short, 94-90 , in Game 7 


8U Assoetetityi stations. according to tho Notional Basket' 

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TeleMonetCano: Latvia: Latvian TV; Lithuania: Baltic TV; 

JSSSfr N^C N«Wawfe Rm- 

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ga nmna : RT7; Russia: Russian TV: SUwalcfai: ainuni.it> tw- t\i 


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AFRICA 

Burkina Faso: TVB; Gape Verde: CVB; Gabon: Canal Horizon; 
Bissau: GBB; Ivory Goose Canal Horizon/RTl; Morocco: 2M; 
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Anrtmjan: Russian TV; Bahrain: Bahrain TV; Israel: iCP/2nd Chan- 
nel; Jordan: Jordan TV; Kazakhstan; Russian TV; Kuwait: Kuwait TV; 
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co/ Saudi TV- Tajikistan: Russian TV; Turkev: TRT; Turkmenistan: 
Russian TV; Unfed Arab Emirates: uae TV; Uzbekistan: Russian TV. 



Compiled by Oar Staff from Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Patrick Ewing 
refused to let ihe New York Knicks 
lose. 

He refused to fold under the 
pressure of Game 7 in the Eastern 
Conference finals. 

He refused to let foul trouble 
bother him in the dosing minutes 
of the biggest game ofhis National 
Basketball Association career. 

He refused to give up when (be 
Knicks, t railing the Indiana Pacers 
by a point, missed a crucial shot 
with about 30 seconds left 

When John Starks missed, Ewing 
grabbed the rebound and dunked it 
to give New York the lead for good 
in a 94-90 victory that sent the 
Knicks to the NBA Fmals for the 
Hist time in 21 years. 

The gigantic jam climaxed a sen- 
sational game for Ewing, who had 
24 points. 22 rebounds, 7 assists 
and 3 blocks despite picking up his 
fifth foul with 4:52 remaining and 
the Knicks elingfaig to an 83-BO 
lead. 

“1 don't think I’ve ever seen any- 
one play a better game at the mo- 
ment of truth.” said the Knicks' 
coach, Pat Riley. 

Twenty- two seconds after pick- 
ing up his fifth foul, Ewing fed 
Anthony Mason for a layup that 
put the Knicks ahead, 85-80. With 
two minutes left, Indiana had cm it 
to 87-86, but Ewing hit a baseline 
jumper, and New Yak led by 
three. 

Tiviijuia came back and took a 
90-89 lead on a dunk by Dale Davis 
with 34 seconds remaining. Again 
Ewing responded, this time with his 


Fidm The A ■'•mini Picv. ■ 


Patrick Ewing soared up Co dunk, patting the Knicks ahead of In diana for good with 26 seconds left 


Starks missed a driving 
shot, the 7-foot center grabbed the 
rebound above the rim and 
slammed it home with 26 seconds 
left. 

“Antonio Davis had to come 
over to pick up Starks when he 


drove; and no one picked up Pat- 
rick," Rjley said. “Actually, John 
missed the shot in a perfect way." 
It was a perfect ending for Ewing 

and the Knicks, who will travel to 
Houston to play the Rockets in 
Game ! of the NBA Finals on 
Wednesday nighL 

“He siqpped up tonight, and that 
was the difference," said the Pac- 
ers’ coach, Larry Brown. “As a 
coach, Tm in awe of him for what 
he's done." 

Despite Ewing’s dunk, the Pac- 
ers stm had a chance to win. But 
Reggie Miller shot an airball and 
then was whistled for a controver- 
sial flagrant foul against Starks 
with 32 seconds left and the Pacers 
trailing by one. 

Miller, desperate to stop the 
dock, slapped at Starks and ap- 
peared to nit him in the face. Refer- 
ee Mike Mathis called it a flagrant 
foul, giving Starks two foul shots 
and subsequent possession to the 
Knicks. 

After Starks made one of two 
free throws, the Pacos were forced 
to foul him again, and the Knicks 
guard hit two more from the line to 
clinch the victory. 

Miller, who was crying after the 
game, disputed the flagrant foul. 

“It’s die conference finals and 
you can’t call that," he said. 

Box Mathis defended his deci- 
sion. “The definition of a flagrant 
foul is one that is excessive and 
unnecessary,” he said. “That's 
what the foul was." 

Excessive could also describe the 
Knicks' rebounding edge over the 
Phoers. New York won the battle of 
the boards. 51-29, and grabbed 28 
offensive rebounds, two short of 
the NBA playoff record. 

“They killed us cm the boards,” 
Brown said. 

The Knicks are in the finals for 
the first time since 1973, when they 
won their second tide, and they will 



en the four- of-seven-game 

lionship series Wednesday 
the Houston Rockets 
at the Summit. 

The Pacers, who were trying 10 
make Lhe NBA finals for the first 
time in their history, finally saw 
their impressive playoff run end, 
but not without putting up an ad- 
mirable fight 

New York’s victory gave the 

home team 19 consecutive tri- 
umphs in Game Ts. 

Starks scored 17 points and 
Derek Harper added 16 for New 
York, which trailed by 12 late in die 
third period. 

Miller led Indiana with 25 
points. The Pacers' Byron Scott, 
who played on three tide teams for 
the Riley-coached Los Angeles 
Lakers in the 1980s, scored 17 
points on 6-for-7 shooting. 

“This mam is right op there with 
those championship teams," Scott 
said. “We played with daerarina- 
tioti- It was a tough loss, but we 
didn't back down. We just came up 
a liule short" 

The NBA Fmals wiB feature a 
championship rematch between 
Ewing and Houston’s center. Ha- 
keem Olajuwon. Ewing’s George- 
town Hoyas beat Olajuwon's 
Houston Cougars for the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association ti- 
tle in 1984. 

“Houston’s a great balldub, so 
we still have to come out and play 
with the same type of intensity,” 
Starks said. 

The Rockets wiB have the home- 
court advantage because they had a 
better regular-season record than 
the Knicks. New York is 9-1 at 
home in the playoffs, but only 2-6 
on the road. 

“The road has been hard for us, 
but I »h?nk that it has nwde qj a 
belter basketball team,” Starks 
said. (AP, NYT) 


Canada Stifles Brazil’s Flair 


French Open to Reimburse Fans 

PARIS (AFP) — The insurers of the French Open tennis champion- 
ships are to pay 2J> million francs to spectators who missed the women’s 
final because it was rained out Saturday, a spokesman said Monday. 

GAP, the official insurer of the French tenuis federation, is to reim- 
burse the price of the tickets or provide tickets for next year's women's 
final after spectators at Roland Garros saw only 18 minutes of play 
became of rain. The match was completed on Sunday. 

UAP is obligated to compensate only spectators who are members of 
the federation or who bought their tickets through iL But it pledged 10 
compensate all thasewbo had tickets for Center Court on Saturday, at a 
cost of S440,0007It is the first time the company, which has ihairedlfie ■ 
tournament for 10 yeats; has had to pay out for cancellation of a final a 
DAP spokesman said. 


Brooks Wins Golfs Kemper Open 


POTOMAC, Maryland (AF) — Marie Brooks won lhe Kemper Open 
with an 18-foot birdie puti on the 18th green, capping a 2-undar-par 69 that 
gave him a three-stroke victory over Bobby Wamdns and D. A. Wdbring. 

Wadlons led Brooks by oik stroke after five holes Sunday, but his 
triple-bogey cm No. 6 dropped him two show behind. Brooks never lost 
the lead, cruiring to his fourth career victory and first since 1991. He had 
a steady round of 16 pars and two birdies to finish with a 13-under 271 
totaL Wadkms shot a 74 artd Weibring bad a 68. 


No Baseball Pros at ^6 Olympics 


LALSANNE (AF) —There will be no baseball Dream Team at the 
1996 Atlanta Olympics. 

The International Baseball Association on Sunday narrowly rejected a 
pr oposal «>«* would have allowed professional baseball players to repre- 
sent their countries in official IBA events, including the Olympics. 

In a vote taken at a special meeting called to decide whether to delete 
any reference to the word amateur from the IBA constitution and by- 
laws, 48 members voted to reword the eligibility reqairemeals and 28 
opposed the change. A two-thirds majority, or 51 of the 76 countries 
represented, would have been needed to pass the motion. 


Compiled br Our Staff From Dispatcher 

Brazil, which is renowned for 
playing soccer with grace, flair and 
artistry, faded to live up to its repu- 
tation only days before the World 
Cup. 

In a cup nmeup, the three-time 
world champions did no better 
than a 1-1 draw with Canada on 
Sunday in Edmonton, Alberta. 

Canada, a soccer weakling, 
failed wguahfy for the 1994 World 
Cop, which begins June 17' But the 
Canadians produced one of their 
finest results on Sunday, thanks to 
a goal by Eddy Berdusco in the 
70th minute. 

Berdusco, a substitute who en- 
tered in the 62d minute, sent the 
crowd of 51,930 into a frenzy when 
be hammered a shot high into the 
left comer over the Brazilian goal- 
keeper, Claudio Taffarel. 

“Ifs a huge goal for me," Ber- 
dosoo said. “When they write it 
down in the books Canada played 
Brazil, my name will be there for 
scoring the goaL" 

“Everybody thought we were go- 
ing to get blown out, be added. 
“They said the only time we’d 
touch the ball is when we fished it 
out of the back of the net” 

Romano opened the scoring on a 
b effort in the 45th minute, 
the game, the Brazilian play- 
ers stomped off the field, refusing 
to shake hands with the Canadians. 


“We didn't score when we bad 
to,” Coach Carlos Parreira said. 

Brazil begins World Cup play 
June 20 against Russia in Stanford, 
California. 

In East Rutherford, New Jersey. 
Colombia used second-half goals 
by Herman Gaviria and Freddy 
Rincon to overpower Greece; 24). 
in a World Cup warmup for both 
teams. 

The game was played before a 
Giants Stadium crowd of 73,51 1, 
and marked the first test of the 
stadium's new grass field, which 
appeared to hold up well. 

Colombia opens play June 18 
against Romania at the Rose Bowl. 
Greece opens June 2! against Ar- 
gentina in Foxboro, Massachu- 
setts. 

During the game Sunday, three 
Greek players had cash, jewelry 
and other valuables stolen from 
their bold room, the police said 
Monday. 

72k robbery was described by a 
police spokesman as a “minor lar- 
ceny.” He said Lhe amount taken 
was not known and that the police 
were still investigating the incident. 


Mendoza, announced on Monday, 
Reuters reported. 

Laudrup, who said last month 
that he was leaving Barcelona, the 
Spanish champion, after five sea- 
sons because of differences with 
Coach Johan Cruyff, settled the 
deal in talks in Copenhagen on 
Friday. 

Mendoza said Laudrup would 
sign the contract in July. 


Lara Sets First-Class Cricket Score Mark 


Compiled bp Our Staff From Dispatches 

BIRMINGHAM, England — 
The West Indian batsman Brian 
Lara set a world record for the 
highest innings in first-class 
cricket with 501 not out for War- 
wickshire on Monday. 

Lara’s score came on the 
fourth and final day of the coun- 
ty championship match against 
Durham at Edgbaston. 


He broke Hanif Mohammad's 
record of 499, set while playing 
for Karachi against Bahawalpur 
at Karachi, Pakistan, in the 
1958-59 season, and along the 
way be set 1 3 other records in the 

inning s. 

The milestone came less than 
two months after Lara set a re- 
cord Test score of 375 against 
E ng la n d in Antigua. 


Since then, he has beoome the 
first player to score seven centu- 
ries in eight first class innings. 

On Monday, he also broke the 
record for the most runs scored 
in a day with 390, to surpass 
Charlie Macartney’s effort lot 
Australia of 345 against Notting- 
hamshire in 1921. 

f Reuters, AF) 


■ Real Madrid Gets Laudrup 
The Danish international mid- 
fielder Michael Laudrup has 
reached an agreement to play for 
Real Madrid for the nex; two sea- 
sons, the dub's president, Ramon 


SCOREBOARD 


BASEBALL 


Major League Stancflnaa 


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Tour of Italy 


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oln. Spain. Banesto. 3:00; 4, Ghmnl Bugno. 
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Mofson RadrtBuaz. Colombia. ZC MabilL 10:15; 
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New York wins series 4ft 

taoiam: Dj0avfcr»lH>4McKsyeftGZ 14 . 
Smtts 6-13 0-1 n,M« lor 7-17M2S, werlunan 1- 
3 M Z Ajori* M 4ft & Fleming w m X 
tiMfwtan M Ml, NlttcheniftM X Seen u9 
44 17. Totals 3641 1*21 ML 

Mm Yortu Oakley 6-13 9ft LbSmUttjMM L 
EwfnaMft364M,Haroor5-1444la.Starks5- 
1* 4ft 17, Mason 6-10 0-0 H. Alimony 0-2 (Hi IL 
aOovWftM4.KwratomsMMaTotoJB37- 
*» 15-71 At 

UPele* ■oato— Indiana L9 (Miller 34, 
MoCoy 2-iScWT 1-2, WorWIanMhMew York 
MJ (Stortm, Hcow M, Anttway M.VLOa- 
vU Ml. Fooled eel N one. RafteMds— ln- 
dkmte (Smto.AjDavts6), New York £9 (Ew 
log 22). ftsslsto— imflano u (Woriunan. 
MdCey U, Now York 2? (Ewing?). TWal foul- 
«— Indiana 3L New York 24 Ftooranf 
ton DJtovis. MIIMC. A— 1W61 


NOHonai I eaguc 

ATLANTA— Signed Ray McWMte, itilrd 
basem an ; Brad Newell, sh or tsto p; Will torn 
Wood, second boa emon ; Antonio williams, 
outfielder; and Zocborv Coilbts. pitcher. As- 
Honed McWhito and Newell to Danville. Ap- 
palachian League; wood am williams to 
West Paten Beach. GuH Coast Ueaoue; and 
Collins to Idaho Fails. Pioneer League. 

COLORADO — Put Darren Holmes, pitcher, 
on 15-davdbabiod list. Recalled Lonce Palm- 
ar. pltdier. tram Colorado Springs. 

FLORIDA— Stoned Victor Rodriguez, 
shortstop; Matthew Meadows. Chad Miles, 
Jemmy Ross. Randv Shooena and Joel Sto- 
often HonarxLaitchers; Jose Comi 10 . out! leid- 
or; Lionel Hastings am Vltolter wMte. infleld- 
ers: and Theodore MeCartnev. catcher. 

N.Y. METS— Stoned David Sanaerson, out- 
fielder. 

POOTOALL 

u yWni^ i l cm tt’rm Innuuii 

PHILADELPHIA— Waived Andre Waters, 
safety; Ken carton, auartenmek; James 
Lofton, wtdo receiver; Keith Mlltord. defen- 
sive tackle, - am Brim Bttdteger. Ron Hall- 
Ctrum and Mika Sctiad, offensive linemen. 
Tendered uuontyW® otters to Rich Mlm, 
safety; Mike Flores, defensive end; am Tam 
McHala end Erie Fiord, offensive linemen. 

COLLEGE 

COLLEGE FOOTBALL ASSOCIATiON- 
— Elected wiHtom E. Tucker chairman am C. 
William Byrne eecretorv-irrasurw. Named 
Warner AHanL Lovell EdwmdA DanW E. 
fiini tor. Bab Gola Carl James. Ed pastllong, 
and Paul L. Raacti to Hie board or directors. 

SANTA BARBARA— Chris RussHL worn- 
■rt Iannis eoodv will take l-voor leave of 
tewet Named Pete Ktekwood. assistant 
eooeh. Inlerim coocn. 

SONOMA ST^-Nomod Pot Fuscakto men's 
basketoall coach. 

SOUTHERN METHODIST— «anvd OWt 
Uon. men's aalstanr upaketMU coach. 

5TDNEHILLL— Named Ctila Forrest base- 
ball 

STONY BROOK — Mamed Becfcle Dlddn- 
mi wnen'B baskatoatl coach. 

TULANE— Named Sieve Roccrtanr men's 
nteMtml basketball coach. 

TULSA— Named OtristettWr Small athlet- 
ic dlroctor. 

UC SANTA BARBARA— Named Virgil 
WWaon men* assistant tnskaitall coach. 


The IHT World Cup Competition 

Win fabulous prizes. 


Winners will be chosen from an official drawing. 
The first 1 6 entries drawn, with at least 6 correct 
responses, will win one of the prizes listed below, 
determined from the order in which they are 
drawn. 

Grand Prize: Two United Airlines business class 
round-trip Europe/New \fork tickets plus five 
nights accommodation at the Stanhope Hotel in 
New York. 

Five second prizes: Sprint Collectors frame pre- 
paid phone cards in celebration of the World Cup. 
Five third prizes: AT Cross, 22k gold, diamond 
cut. Roller ball pens, from the Signature 
Collection. 

Five fourth prizes: Gold Pfeil men’s wallets. 


HERE’S HOW TO ENTER 


For each of the 12 days leading up to the World 
Cup, the IHT will publish a question in which the 
response predicts various outcomes of facets of 
the World Cup. There are 12 questions in all. 

After answering the question each day in the 
coupon provided below, hold your responses and 
send them all at once to the IHT. A minimum of 6 
responses must be postmarked on or before June 
17, 1994 — the World Cup kickoff day. 



Group A 


USA 

SWITZERLAND 

COLOMBIA 

ROMANIA 

Group B 


BRAZIL 

RUSSIA 

CAMEROON 

SWEDEN 


Group C 


GERMANY 

BOLIVIA 

SPAIN 

KOREA REPUBLIC 
Group D 


ARGENTINA 

GREECE 

NIGERIA 

BULGARIA 

Group E 


Only clippings from the newspaper will be 
accepted. Photocopies and faxes do not qualify. 


ITALY 

IRELAND REPUBLIC 
NORWAY 
MEXICO 
Group F 


BELGIUM 
MOROCCO 
NETHERLANDS 
SAUDI ARABIA 


RULES AND CONDITIONS 


TODArS QUESTION 


i. 


2 . 


5. 


6 . 


TRANSACTIONS 


BASEBALL 
AtBOriCOH LOOBOO 

boston — A ctivated Jctm Vatontm. stwT* 
itofV front 75-ttOV dtaablad ll*L Optioned Lute 
Offer biffoMcr, to Pawtucket, lj_ 

CALI FORNIA— Put Demon Eadov.Mtota- 
Bf, on udor diwtotoc itoi. retnwettvo eoMoy 

31 

OAKLAND— Do Honed Mtourt Jlmonex. 
oJ tetter, to Tacoma, PCL. Rocatttd Daw 
Lotaar, pl tetter, from Tacoma 
TEXAS— Stoned Kevin L, Brawn atlEttar. 
m ate nod him to Hudson Volley, now York 
Pom Lcopuc. 


FIRST TEST 

■■Btal vs. New 2tetoMb Lott Day 
Monday. In Neithtoinm. Eoytaod 
New Zeahm HI Innings: 251 
Emkmd In Inninao; 5674 
New Zealand 2 m Innlngg; 226 
England wan by on tavntate ttad 90 nine. 




WORLD CUP WARM UP MATCHES 
CotemWa 2, Greece 0 
COMda L Brazil l 
Etamdor 2, Soutk Korea t 


Individual coupons will not be accepted. 

Minimum of 6 coupons to qualify. 

Cut-off date is postmarks of the first day of the World 
Cup— June 17. 1994. 

Valid only where legal. 

Entries will not be accepted from staff and families of 
the IHT newspaper, its agents and subsidiaries. 

Only original coupons will be considered valid. 
Photocopies and faxes are not acceptable. 

No correspondence will be entered into. Proof of 
postage will not be accepted as proof of receipt 
No cash alternative to prizes. 

In some countries, the law forbids participation in this 
competition for prize awards. However, in these 
countries, you can still play for fun. The competition is 
void where illegal. 

Winners will be drawn on day after the end of the World 
Cup and published in the IHT on Thursday 21 July. 

10. On all matters, the editor's decision is final. 

11 . The Editor reserves the right in his absolute discretion to 
disqualify any entry, competitor or nominee, or to wave 
any rules in the event of circumstances outside our 
control arising which, in his opinion, makes it desirable 
to cancel the competition at any stage. 

12. The winners will be the first correct answers containing 
six or more coupons picked at random from all entries. 


How many goals will become the widest winning 
margin? 


Your response:. 


Name:. 


Job Title;. 


Company:. 
Address: _ 


9. 


Postal Code:, 


.City:. 


Country:. 


Telephone:. 


3J7 


Send responses i w IHT Workl Cup Competition. International Herald 
Tribune. ISI Avenue Clwrles-de-Gaulle. 92521 NeuiUy Codex. France. 


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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 1994 


ART BUCHWALD 


Teeing Off on Copters 


W ASHINGTON — Tilings oc- 
casionally happen in Wash- 
ington that people outside the Belt- 
way just can’t understand. 

Recently, David Watkins, a top 
White House aide used While 
House helicopters to play golf at 
the Holly Hills Country Club in 
Maryland. 

A lot of spoilsports complained 
that this was a waste of taxpayers' 
money. Watkins 
didn't see it that 
way. The Ma- 
rine Corps heli- 
copters were not 
being used in 
Haiti at that mo- 
ment, Watkins 
had finished his 
work for the day 
and everyone 
knows that a _ 

golf outing is es- Bucnwakl 

senlial to the smooth running of 3 
great country. 

When the Firestorm struck. Wat- 
kins gave another reason for the 
helicopter ride. He maintained that 
all he was doing was making a dry 
run in case President Clinton de- 
cided to play the Holly Hills course 
some time in the future. He was 
also curious to see if the club's golf 
carts had air bags. "It was purely a 
business trip." he said and no one 
should criticize him for taking it. 

□ 

Unfortunately. President Clin- 
ton blew his stack — or whatever a 
president blows when one of his 
staff screws up. He reassured the 
American people that they would 
not have to pay for whirlybtnis. 



The cost was 513.l2y.6b. Wat- 
kins. a very wealthy but frugal man. 
announced that he had no inten- 
tion of chipping in one golf tee 
because he didn't think he bad 
done anything wrong. 

Pan to the While House — the 
president calls his entire staff into 
the Oval Office and says, "Ladies 
and Gentlemen, we have a slight 
problem. David Watkins took off 
in one of our helicopters yesterday 
to play a round of golf at a country 
club near Frederick. Maryland. Be- 
cause he was photographed board- 
ing the aircraft with his golf clubs, 
the helicopter blades have hit the 
fan. 

"I have assured the country that 
the American taxpayer will not 
have to pay a dime for Dave's 
game. Since he insists that he did 



TT O'? 


li 




ation 



nothing wrong, I am asking senior 


members of the White House staff 
to pass the hat.” 

An aide says, “That’s fine with 
me, sir. 1 love golf and I’ll just 
donate the money I had set aside to 
send my kids to summer camp.” 

Another aide says. "Clara and I 
will put our house on the market." 
□ 


Tin tin Drawing Sold 

For $100,000 in Paris 


.4 genre France-Prnsc 

PARIS — An unidentified bid- 
der has paid a record 558.425 
francs (nearly $100,000) for a 
drawing from the I93S first edition 
of the Tin Lin comic book “LTIe 
Noire" (Black Island), auction offi- 
cials said. 

The India-ink drawing, which 
graced the front cover of the Belgian 
cartoonist Herge's work, was sold at 
a sale devoted entirely to Tin tin 
works, the auctioneers said. The sale 
raised a total of nearly 12 million 
francs, with 275 of the 297 items on 
offer being sold 


The president says. “You don't 
have to do that if you don't want 
to.” 

A staffer called Louie chimes in. 
“Of course we warn to. Today they 
bash Watkins for flying off to play 
golf — tomorrow' ii could be one of 
us." 

The president lakes one of HiUa- 
ry's straw hats and passes it around 
tne room. 

Another top staffer says. “If we 
pay for his golf game. NIr. Presi- 
dent can we kill him?” 

Fortunately for the staff. Wat- 
kins finally 'announced that he 
would foot the damages, seeing 
how he was a millionaire and every- 
thing. 

□ 


One of the mysteries about the 
Walkins affair was why were two 
helicopters involved? The president 
explained. “You have to have two 
— one to lake you there and the 
other to hover over the fairways in 
case you lose your hall." 

Despite agreeing to pay for his 
golf game Watkins refuses to apol- 
ogize for his joyride. But he did 
agree to donate his golf clubs and 
shoes to the President Gin ton Pres- 
idential Librarv. 


By Frank J. Prial 

Vev York Tima jfcrmv 

O N Aug. 15. 1944. 10 weeks after D- 
Day. another Allied force disem- 
barked on the beaches of France. On that 
day. 1.000 vessels stood off the Mediterra- 
nean coast and put several hundred thou- 
sand American and French troops ashore 
at Saim-Raphael, Saint-Tropei and Mar- 
seille. 

Their mission: to race north through the 
Rhone Valley to join the Allied forces 
fighting their way eastward from the Nor- 
mandy beaches toward Paris and the 
Rhine. The landings and (he campaign 
that followed were 
known as Operation 
Anvil. 

Anvil never cap- 
tured the public's 


imagination as did Op- 
i. tne 


eration Overlord 
D-Day cross-channel 
invasion. With good 
reason: The landing 

were virtually unop- 

posed and the Ger- 
mans offered only token resistance as 
they fled north to join the final battle for 

their homeland. 

But for one participant, at lea?;. Anvil 
bad special significance: it was to him a 
campaign to save the great vineyards of 
France from the beer-drinkir.g Huns. 

Wynford Vaughan Thomas was a Brit- 
ish war correspondent attached first to 
the American troops unde: General Al- 
exander Patch, the overall commander of 
Anvil, and later to General Jean de La tire 
de Tassigr.v. who led the French par. of 
the operation. 

i am indebted to the historian and 
writer Robert E. Quirk for a copy of 
Thomas’s reminiscences about the cam- 
paign. first published in an essay collec- 
tion called “The Compleat Imbiber" ia 
London in 1963. 

Thomas got his first inkline of what 
Anvil would be like when he stormed 
ashore with the Americans a: Sain [-Ra- 
phael. When the ramp on lhair landing 
craft dropped down, they rushed into the 
warm surf and up the beach through a 
smoke screen. Coming out of the murk, 
they spied a Riviera villa that had es- 
caped the prdandinz shelling. 

“The door opened." Thomas wrote, 
“and an immaculately dressed French- 
man appeared. He carried a tray on 
which were 10 glasses and a bottle of 
Veuve Clicquot '34. 


For one participant, 
Operation Anvil had 
special significance: 

So spare die grapes. 


•* ‘Welcome, gentlemen.' he said in 
French and added in English, ‘even if you 
are a bit late.' ’’ 

Writing 10 years after the landing. 
Thomas said. “Time softens controversy 
and the history of distant wars grows 
mellow like ’49 Burgundy.” 

One look at the map and the route 
taken by the invading armies, Thomas 
said, made the raison d’etre of the cam- 
paign clear. “Ahead of the advancing 
troops was grouped such a collection of 
noble names that the mouth waters as the 
hand types them: Cha lea uneuf-du- Pape. 
Tavel, Tain-1’ Hermit age, Chateau Gril- 
le!. the Cote R6tie. 
and, beyond, the great- 
esl objective of them 
all — Burgundy and 
the Cote d’Or'.” 

Among those who 
planned Anvil was a 
French general and 
wine lover. Lucien de 
Montsabert. Thomas 

said that he had no 

documentary proof but 
that be felt certain it was de Montsabert 
who sent the American troops through 
the Basses- Alpes. 

“Their job was vital, but the vinously 
minded historian will note that it did not 
take them near a single vineyard of quali- 
ty.” he said. “Now follow the advance of 
the French Army. Swiftly they possessed 
themselves of Tavel, and after making 
sure that all was well with one of the 
finest vin roses in France, struck fiercely 
for Chateauneuf-du-Pape. The Cbte R6- 
tie fell to a well-planned flanking at- 
tack.” 

Meanwhile, the Americans were work- 
ing their way up the eastern, mostly vine- 
yard-free side of the Rhdne. Visiting the 
.American headquarters, Thomas found 
the commanders a bit disturbed. “We get 
a feeling that the Frogs are dra gg ing their 
feet,” an officer said. “They’re staying 
too long at some place called Chalons 
something or other.” 

indeed they were. Chalon-sur-Satae is 
the southern gateway to the great Bur- 
gundy vineyards, which the French above 
all wanted to avoid turning into battle- 
grounds. 

“We must not forget 1870," a French 
officer told Thomas later that day. The 
officer said that one of the last battles of 
(he Fra neo-Prussian War had been 
fought around Nuits-Saim-Georges. an 
important Burgundy wine town, and that 




Tbcfiritidi actress Vaacg albfr 
botc, whose pofitics havemadejs; 
awBthwniu jp-nany jjv tJk : -* 

^^^§£*^£a,tbeaicr^.. 
Redgrave is scheduled fa appear in 
“Bnpfifit ia Bdk;” a selection efthe ; 

Gerpiari playwaght 

Bredtfs 

rn-eriJe-from Nasi Germany. 0 fed 

Safer, the t&eaKr ^rccto^ ^id 


as 31 


.peace accords! s tance 

onceandfor a2 tehsfcjow tfcjgcaj; 
actress 

■■ - '~ r ~ v ■ 


The 1 

Honda' architect Frank. <X_Gefay, 

. will be opened bffitiaS(y fa-p&j&sf.,' 
by E toy Rodham CEnton j&d 

. Orftiire IVfimster Jflapw^TtwhoiL 
The American Ceafcr w&Tosa&d' 
m I93Tas a meeting place'foj'ywjng 
.Americans but rap&Ky ftowaied : 
its scope to become aceoid.for - 

American music, theater, tjaj^ce and 

dm. It wfll open .(rflfcp&^ca 
Wednesday./. - Tfejlm'fady T - 
and David Leftenuaa’siaoagbtTY . 
Guide’s booms this yeat^G&ttoo . 
dcariy deserves theawanffor rbesi 
pe rforma nce ia a drimavV.^Q’ ' 
press conference," for bej five^houj. 
long news conference Qo ^WS 
water, the magazine s^dtai&r 
al “best aid worst” issue, 
lett t nma^ Winter. < 
portage earned her the i 
season’s best pedbvflttq&b^aii 


eC-' 


... 


/.» . 


SuenubMul HcraMTiftanr 


Prussian reserves, rushing to the from. 


had marched through and destroyed the 
legendary vineyards of La Tacbe, Ro- 
manee-Conti and Richebourg. 

At that point. Thomas wrote, a young 
officer rushed in to announce that weak 
points in the German defense had been 
found. “.And. mon colonel."’ the officer 
said, “every one is on a vineyard of inferi- 
or quality.” 

The Germans were quickly put to flight 
and within a day or two. the correspon- 
dent and de Montsaben were racing up 
the highway through Burgundy. 

“A blown bridge here, a demolished 
house there — what could these matter 
beside the great, over-riding fact of the 
undamaged vineyards stretching mile af- 


ter mile before us?” Thomas wrote. 

Soon the French troops — or at least 
the officers and correspondents — were 
savoring the best from the cellars of 
Aioxe-Corton and Vosne- Romance. The 
wines, Thomas said, bad been hidden 
behind false cellar walls. To allay the 
suspicions of the Nazis. labels of great 
wines had been repasted on cheap ones, 
which the conquerors drank with relish. 

“I have drunk great wines in many 
parts of France.” Thomas said, “but nev- 
er have I tasted such nectar as was of- 
fered to me during the early days of the 
liberation of Burgundy. That whole en- 
chanted period of my life is a symphony 
of popping coiics.” 


amateur. 

r 

Don Johnson, steroTp&Bk.. 
Vice,” has been admitted; 

Betty Ford Cento for.aktt&fi&s 
and drug addicts fbr.wpspeg&d- 
treatment his pobfioa sod. 'Tkr 
actor is expected^ 
center, in R nm-fx y 
nia, for up to a mriatft/. ./T 

Mfemo Katsni mid 
Nagel of Japan and Ralph Scfad. 
vogd and Cheafe Xdurf - 
land took top bondttht fbe r«4vt^ 
Warsaw inlematktt&f poSter-bttev 
niaL' ' ' '= •/' .. r ' 


INIEnxmM 

CLASSIEEEPH4 

Appears on - ; -. 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 




.• . r-i.- v'.-.v .• 

- ••■ ■■ T • j 




Europe 


rcrecasi tor Wednesday through Friday, as provided by Accu-Wsather. Asia 



Wqh 

Low 

W 

High 

Low 

W 


OF 

OF 


OF 

OF 


AJganre 

2892 

19*4 

O 

28.*2 

19*9 

■ 

Apriknfem 

19-86 

13/55 

DC 

15.59 

9-48 

»n 

Ankara 

am 

9/49 


19W 

7.44 

sh 

Atfwns 

25-77 

13/55 

a 

27/Wl 

TS59 

9 


26/75 

IB/M 

9 

27.H0 

18*4 


sr- 

1599 

6-43 

c 

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12.83 

9 

2*798 

11/52 

* 

2V73 

11*2 



24/75 

11. M 


19 66 

6-43 

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18*4 

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c 

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12. 52 

c 

CopOTihagm 

1296 

a /40 

sh 

1792 

8*46 

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CoKflOe/S-jl 

2994 

21.70 

K 

3056 

22-71 

PC 

CM* 

1891 

3/37 

c 

13 55 

4 79 


Edmt«gh 

1395 

8/46 

i 

1355 

7-44 


FV««ice 

22/71 

15.59 

DC 

2790 

-691 


FranMi»I 

23/73 

12*3 


23 73 

10.5-3 

| 

Geneva 

24/75 

13*5 


25.77 

1253 

oh 

HtOe*. 

1B9* 

M/52 


1064 

10-W 


KnartM 

21.70 

15*9 


21-70 

13-55 


LasPolmK 

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21/70 


?:.«■ 

X-58 

9 

Lstm 

26/79 

16/61 

i 

26-79 

10M 

sn 

London 

21/70 

10*0 


17-W 

0.43 

P4 

Uedrd 

3196 

14*7 


30 99 

16.1 1 

M4en 

24/75 

1691 


2892 

17*2 

s 

Uracw 

2790 

17*2 


2577 

16 61 

1 

Minch 

1996 

M/52 

c 

24.75 

12*3 

s 

r/co 

23/73 

18*1 


25/77 

17.52 

s 

Q* 

1792 

6/43 

sh 

14.57 

541 


Pakra 

26.79 

19/66 

s 

26/79 

13 96 


Pens 

24/75 

13/55 


2096 

10-50 

ih 

Prague 

1990 

1253 


2475 

13*5 


Bovtfiv* 

Iu/50 

(•<43 

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12.53 

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Roto 

24/75 

1457 

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2790 



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16.59 

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1691 

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34 ns 

12/53 


37.80 

10*0 


Tolmn 

1792 

12/53 


18*4 

11*2 


V«m 

23/73 

19/64 


27.90 

19-66 


VW.M 

2098 

u<57 


21 '70 

1497 


Wamw 

1894 

9/46 


15-50 

7/44 


Zurich 

2271 

1253 

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25.79 

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Oceania 

Auddand 

1691 

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10.90 

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Spkwr 

17/82 

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18 64 

1152 

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JrtSi».i|n 


North America 

Drv. pioasanl wealh?i will 
sente along :he East Ccasi 
from Washington. D.C.. lo 
Bpsicn Wcdn9Sdav and 
T^ursoay. Hoi vaeamer will 
f r om Phoeni* itv.ju^i 
Los Angeles and San Fian- 
ci«o law this week . Srai- 
iered thundersiorms will 
roam Ihrougn The ceniral 
Prams law ihts weet 1 . 


Europe 

Heavy rams win snaK ihe 
eastern Ukraine Wednesday 
and Thursday CtilHy weath- 
er will gradually overspread 
northwestern Europe, includ- 
ing London and Paris, later 
ihis week Hoi weather over 
southern Spam wHI graduafly 
move southward into north- 
western Africa Athens wilt 
have dry. pleasant weather. 


Asia 

Heavy w.n ron:-suo r-:r 
southeastern Chin? 31 leas: 
Wednesday .t»u. Thursday 
North-remrai China, .nslud- 
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Shandong province, will 
remam dor and vaannpr man 
normal, ram is needed in I he 
area Seoul wiB have dry. 
warm weather while Tokvo 
nas a few showers 


Asia 


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15 Willa Cather's 

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16 With sickly 
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23 Shooter arrmo 

24 Pan 2 ot motto 

28 Take- — 
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32 Twosome 

36 Martinique, e g 

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Solution lo Puzzle of June 6 


Middle East 


Latin America 


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t/mruxi 

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40/104 24/75 
21/79 12*3 
19*64 9/48 

22/71 11/52 
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pc 21/70 1152 pc 
pc 23-73 11/52 pc 
pc 25T7 10-50 t 
pc 21.70 10/50 pc 
PC 3198 24.75 pc 
pc 3391 23/73 pc 
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39 Hook shape 

41 ‘Don't Bring Me 
Down" rock 
group 

42 Miami's county 

44 Blanche in ‘The 

Golden Girls' 

46 Part 4 of motto 

48 Panicle 

so Conquering 
hero 

51 Part 5 ot motto 

54 AenafiSt'S 
safeguard 

55 Theater people 

56 End of mono 

61 Sightseeing 
Sight 

62 Golfer isao 

53 Smgieton 

64 Ball 

ss A night in Pans 

66 Exterior. Prefix 

67 Blackthorn 
shrubs 

88 1 949 erupter 

65 Creep through 
the cracks 


sOnhold 
4 Make believe 
s Heath 
8 Godmother, 
often 

7 Rings of color 

8 Orig. texts 

9 Mower's (rails 

10 Mouth parts 

11 White, 
informally 

t2 Las; name in 
fashion 
13 Nest for 
21-Down: Var 

21 See 13-Down 

22 ~Me' types 


47 Streets 

49 Medea's 
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28 Fatty 

27 Refrain part 
28 19Q5 Danielle 
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33 Regretfulness 

34 Choir voice 

35 Koh-i 


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China, PRC*m 

10811 

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018-872 

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800-1111 

India* 

000-117 

Indonesia* 

001-801-10 

Japan* 

0039-111 

Korea 

009-11 

Korea** 

11* 

Malaysia* 

800-0011 

New Zealand 

000-911 

Philippines* 

105-11 

Saipan' 

235-2872 

Singapore 

8004111-111 

Sri Lanka 

-130-430 

Taiwan* 

0080-10288-0 

Thailand* 

0i)19-991-llll 

EUROPE 

Armenia*' 

8*14111 

Austria*”' 

022-903-011 

Belgium* 

0800-100-10 

Bulgaria 

00-1800-0010 

Croatia** 

99-38-0011 

Czech Rep 

00420-00101 

Denmark* 

8001-0010 

Finland* 

9800-100-10 

France 

19*-0011 

Germany 

01304010 

Greece* 

00-800-1311 

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OOa-80041111 

Iceland** 

999-001 

Ireland 

1-000-550-000 


Italy 


^ vajsiui me 

800,1111 Macedonia, F.YJL of 9»«KHt288 Ecuador 



Netherlands* 


11* Poland**** 




Sweden* 


155-00-11 


Ukraine* 


MIDDLE EAST 


1-800-10 


COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

Brazil 

000-8010 

drily 

00* -032 2 

Columbia 

980-11-0010 

Costa Rlca'u 

114 

Ecuador* 

119 

ElSahadorta 

190 

Guatemala* 

190 

Guyana*” 

165 

Honduras** 

125 

Medco*A4 

95-800-462-4240 

Nicaragua (Managua) 174 

yaruman 1W 


191 

156' 

Uruguay 

00-0410 

'enezueU'u 

80-011-120 

CARIRRFAM 

Bahamas 

1-800-872-2881 

Bermuda* 

1-WV8-2.2881 

Cayman Islands 

1-800-872-2881 

1-800-S72-2S81 

Grenada* 

1-BOO- 8^2-28Si 

Haiti* 

001 -8CO-972-2fi85 

Jamaica- 

0^00-872-2881 

NcttL Amu 

OO1-800-872-28R1 

St Kitts/Ne^is 

1-800-872-2881 

AFRICA “ 


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'“ere % 


Jr--, 


IV.-..'*- 


ban 






J " 4 A sr 




1 AMERICAS 


800-121 Gabon* 


510-0200 



Gambia* 


QOa-001 


001-800-200-1111 jfaty? 
555 


00113 


Liberia 


08*10- ]Q 




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